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Old 07-23-2014, 08:23 AM   #113
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Steve,

Sorry, but the quote and link you provided have it wrong.

First, that is from a lawyer's website. I don't know of many lawyer's websites that get the science right on tire failures. I suspect that's because they deal in convincing people, not in dispensing truth.

Second, corrosion isn't the mechanism of failure. It's stress and the changing properties of the rubber matrix. The actual failure starts in the rubber just off the surface of the steel wire under the top belt near the edge of the belt. Computer studies have shown this to be the highest stressed area in the tire.

Besides, once the steel wire is exposed, it corrodes very quickly, regardless of whether or not it is the cause of the failure. Someone taking the websites description as gospel would draw the wrong conclusion about the mechanism of failure.

There are a number of ways to improve the situation:

From a tire manufacturer's point of view: Increasing the amount of rubber between the belts in this area, changing to a rubber that has improved properties, including resistance to oxidation, and adding cap plies which both reduce the amount of stress as well as provide a secondary "band-aid" to hold the tire together longer after the failure starts.

From an operator's point of view: Increased load carrying capacity by either using a larger tire or using more inflation pressure (which may mean changing to a higher Load Range).

The primary driver is heat. Increased temperature causes the rubber to age faster (according to the Arrhenius Rule). But there isn't much you can do about the ambient temperature, so tires operating in Phoenix are going to age faster than tires in Minneapolis.
Don't know if you read all the particulars about these tires, but they are E rated, have always been run with 75 PSI (with a TPMS so I know), have been driven mostly at 60 to 65 MPH with occasional speeds up to 70 for short periods of time, and have been in use for less than three years. These tires are rated to carry 2680 lbs at 80 PSI, and have been loaded with approximately 1500 lbs., and there are no higher load range tires available.

I bought these tires and wheels for the main purpose of avoiding an instance like this, and if it were just the one, I could understand a fluke event, but now it has been three of the eight that my friend and I bought on the same day.

Now, having given you all this info in one place, are you telling me to avoid tire failures like this in the future that I should replace trailer tires more often than every 2 1/2 years?

I say this is ridiculous, and all I can deduct from this is that BF Goodrich tires a garbage, and I'm glad I no longer own them. Wonder how the Michelin's will fare at 3 years and 30,000 miles? No one seems to have that much age and use with them on here.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:00 AM   #114
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well , for what it's worth , hear is my 2 cents worth of Michelin L T tire experience . This is about a tire that was built in the seventh week of 2003 . It is a Michelin LTXAS 245/70 R 17 load range E that came new on my 2003 Dodge 2500 . I bought the Dodge with 47,000 miles on it in May of 2012 . It had the original tires from the factory on it with this one under the truck as a spare and had never been on the ground . Being the cheap Charlie that I am and not being able to **** can a never used Michelin , I bought a new set of the same tires and left this one as a spare till the end of July and put it on the left rear of the truck just to get some use out of it . A few weeks later in September we found our present Airstream up in northern Illinois and jumped in the truck and drove up there and brought the trailer home .
We decided to drive to Alaska and back in 2013 so I bought an extra steel wheel from a junkyard to fit the Dodge , " just like all the other wheels on it " and bought another Michelin LT and mounted on it . Put the 10 year old Michelin in the back of the truck for an extra spare and took off to Alaska .
While camped outside of Chicken , Alaska on the way up , I got to feeling sorry for the "OLD" fellow . jacked up the LR of the Dodge and put it on to get some more use out of it in the cool of the Alaskan and Canadian weather . Long story short , Lazy me never got around to taking it off and it stayed there for the rest of the trip plus another 5500 mile journey this May and June out thru Arizona , up thru Utah , Wyoming , South Dakota , Etc, and back to central Texas . Got way more use out of that old Michelin than I ever figured I would , and just retired it "no pun intended" to the barn , yesterday .
Am I crazy for running that ten year old tire all over North America ? Probably so , and would never ever done it except for it being a Michelin .
OK that's enough 2 cents worth for today :-)
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:20 AM   #115
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I think it has already been proven here that tires on a truck are a totally different ball game than tires on a trailer, and I wish I knew why.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:34 AM   #116
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Since "Phoenix" asked for this info.....all three of the 225/75E BFG's failed because of tread separation, all three were in service about 2 1/2 years, were always inflated to 75 PSI, and were driven at mostly 65 MPH, or less with occasional higher speeds up to 75 for short periods of time. Mine had about 30K miles on it, and my friend's had I'm guessing about 25K miles.
Steve,


I just love the shade of toe nail polish you use. Where can I get some just like it?

Ken
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Old 07-23-2014, 11:53 AM   #117
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Steve,


I just love the shade of toe nail polish you use. Where can I get some just like it?

Ken
Ken,

Always the wise guy....my WIFE says HER nail polish is "Big Hair, Big Nails", by OPI. Do you think you want to try some of it?

This morning thinking I was just about finished with repairing the damage from this tire blowout, I was under the trailer applying some calk, and I find that the fender liner is damaged. Damn, will it ever end...

It's the black plastic liner, and I'm trying to decide how to patch it because replacement is out of the question.
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Old 07-23-2014, 12:25 PM   #118
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maybe a generous helping of silicone over the crack , then pop riveting a strip of mudflap rubber over the damaged area ?
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Old 07-23-2014, 12:43 PM   #119
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I think it has already been proven here that tires on a truck are a totally different ball game than tires on a trailer, and I wish I knew why.
Don't recall ever seeing any information as to affect to the inside of a radial tire when it is parked with a load on it for extended periods of time , I know your never supposed to park with only part of the tire holding the load up " like with a board not wide enough for the entire tread to come in contact with even overnight . Could there be a correlation between leaving the tires loaded in the same position ,even parked on flat concrete , for weeks or months with the steel belts and other compounds deflected and future failures ? The pickups tend to be used and moved much more often than a trailer .
How many folks put their Airstreams up on blocks or jacks with the tires off the ground when parked for long periods ?
I always do this with our Safari whenever we back it into the shop after a trip , just to take the load off the axles mainly . any tire gurus out there with info on a stationary loaded tire ?
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Old 07-23-2014, 07:30 PM   #120
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I have repaired the wheel well.

A friend of mine said he had repaired them with fiberglass cloth and polyester resin, so that got me to thinking. Didn't like the ideal of polyester resin, because it sets up rigid, and the wheel well is sort of flexible. Thought about epoxy, but the only thing that epoxy will not stick to well long term is plastic.

So, since the wheel well is black plastic, I tried some ABS glue on it, and it worked great. I first sealed the crack with urethane caulk, then put two layers of plastic screen wire with ABS glue over the area, followed by one layer of 3/4 oz. fiberglass cloth with ABS glue. Very messy job, but it's finished, and I believe it will hold up well.

Hoping I'm finally finished with this repair job.
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Old 07-23-2014, 10:09 PM   #121
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I think it has already been proven here that tires on a truck are a totally different ball game than tires on a trailer, and I wish I knew why.
I would submit that possibly it is the side loading that occurs on the tire on a 2 axle trailer.

I hear of no one telling of a tire failure on a single axle trailer. Yes, yes I know some are going to say that the loading aspect is not the same, when in fact the load factors and variances are figured exactly the same.

Just a thought. Don't mean to throw gas on an already burning fire.
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Old 07-23-2014, 11:00 PM   #122
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It's not necessarily the side-loading on multi-axle trailers. A lot of single-axle Airstream owners like myself have also switched to 16" wheels and LT tires because of blowouts and tread separations. In fact, some of the single axle models have a higher per-tire load than those with 2-3 axles. Plus, when one tire goes flat, there's no second tire to carry the load until you can get stopped -- When a tires blows, your Airstream is immediately running on the rim.
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Old 07-23-2014, 11:52 PM   #123
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It's not necessarily the side-loading on multi-axle trailers. A lot of single-axle Airstream owners like myself have also switched to 16" wheels and LT tires because of blowouts and tread separations. In fact, some of the single axle models have a higher per-tire load than those with 2-3 axles. Plus, when one tire goes flat, there's no second tire to carry the load until you can get stopped -- When a tires blows, your Airstream is immediately running on the rim.
Yes, I have switched both my 20' Argosy and 20' FC to 16 inch LT's. The FC is especially heavy, about 1000# more than the old Argosy.

I have the Goodrich TA's on the Argosy, they are about 3 seasons old now, maybe 4, would need to check the dates. Absolutely no problems to date. The new FC has Michelins and they are only one year old.

One advantage of a single axle trailer is that you can't go far with a failed tire, so the damage may be less than if you didn't detect it rapidly with duals. However, those with TPM's should have good warning immediately in any event and still can get damage, as reported in posts above.
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Old 07-24-2014, 12:02 AM   #124
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Ken,

Always the wise guy....my WIFE says HER nail polish is "Big Hair, Big Nails", by OPI. Do you think you want to try some of it?

This morning thinking I was just about finished with repairing the damage from this tire blowout, I was under the trailer applying some calk, and I find that the fender liner is damaged. Damn, will it ever end...

It's the black plastic liner, and I'm trying to decide how to patch it because replacement is out of the question.
Several years ago I had a similar problem with a hole in the floor of an old car. I got a fibreglass repair kit at an auto parts store. It was very easy to use. When it hardens, just a bit of sanding and then paint accordingly. I'm pretty sure it would work well on the fender well material.

Ken

P.S. The kit contains a piece of fibreglass and a can of resin. It will repair a variety of materials.
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Old 07-24-2014, 06:58 AM   #125
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I would submit that possibly it is the side loading that occurs on the tire on a 2 axle trailer.

I hear of no one telling of a tire failure on a single axle trailer. Yes, yes I know some are going to say that the loading aspect is not the same, when in fact the load factors and variances are figured exactly the same.

Just a thought. Don't mean to throw gas on an already burning fire.
Bruce,

I have thought about the same things, but I have heard of a very few single axle owners with tire troubles, and then how many single axle trailers are there compared to the number of tandems and triples? I know over on the Casita forums they are always looking for better tires because the "ST's" are always blowing out. They too have gone to a lot of "LT" tires, or much heavier and larger, mostly 15" because some of them come with 14's, to get relief.

And about the side load when turning with tandems, big rigs have the same loads on their tires, and those loads are always applied at low speeds, where the steering loads on the front tires of passenger vehicles are at much higher speeds. Passenger vehicles also put greater stopping, and acceleration loads on tires. Supposedly, the absence of these loads from "ST" tires is what gives them the much higher weight ratings than passenger vehicle tires, however, I suspect it is the greater insulation from possibility of serious loss of life litigation.

These are just my thoughts.
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Old 07-24-2014, 07:11 AM   #126
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Several years ago I had a similar problem with a hole in the floor of an old car. I got a fibreglass repair kit at an auto parts store. It was very easy to use. When it hardens, just a bit of sanding and then paint accordingly. I'm pretty sure it would work well on the fender well material.

Ken

P.S. The kit contains a piece of fibreglass and a can of resin. It will repair a variety of materials.
Thanks Ken, and I have used fiberglass a little in the past, but chose to go with plastic since I thought it might stick better, and more closely resemble the flexibility of the plastic wheel well. I'll take a picture today and post it, as I think it turned out good.
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