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Old 10-20-2013, 08:53 PM   #127
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Hate to tell you that the Marathon that peeled a strip of rubber on my Classic was Canadian built. Failed at the end of its 3 rd year of use.
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Old 10-21-2013, 06:07 PM   #128
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Below is an excerpt from a post in a blog I maintain with another user name. It sort of fits what is being discussed here.

We often see complaints of trailer tire failures followed with remarks about the inferiority of that particular tire brand. Seldom is there any follow-up information as to the actual cause of the failure. When reading reports filed with NHTSA, that trend is also present there in a very high percentage of dissatisfaction reports.

Many people don't like what their tire retailers say when they take their tires in for examination after a failure. The feedback they get about how the tire was damaged prior to failure is disturbing to them.

We all read about what the industry has to say about why trailer tires fail so often. One of those problems cannot be resolved. Tire history. None of us know what has happened to our trailer tires before we took position of them. If they were abused by the previous owner, dealer, transporter or even the factory, we're probably not going to know the extent of the abuse by looking at them. Any damage is cumulative and shortens the tire's life expectancy. It can also explain why multiple tire failures are sometimes so close together.

Learn the safe operating and maintenance procedures for your trailer tires. When a failure occurs, do some troubleshooting. Sometimes it's hard because there isn't much left. When there is, the cause can be found.

Separations appear as bulges on the sidewall, shoulder, tread face, or as localized wear above the separation region. A grove worn along the shoulder could be a sign of separation. Separations are mainly caused by abnormal heat build-up during high speed driving, over loaded or under-inflated tire conditions. Separations can also be caused by penetration of water or foreign material in to the carcass of the tire. This material enters through cuts caused by road hazards.
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Old 10-22-2013, 02:35 PM   #129
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Here's a first! we were driving back on I-40 last weekend towing our 31 foot International. Around m/m 205 heading east in NC, a nice motorist passes us, gets our attention and lets me know I have a problem. Fortunately for us we are right at exit 208 Colfax NC where we get allot of the work done on the Airstream at ODM, and we always fuel up at the Shell station. We pull in, and sure enough the driver side AS rear, rear is going flat and it is a Marathon. We pulled at a nice speed of about 55-60 and after taking on fuel when over to get it looked at. Tires age was by DOT was 3404 so it was due. One thing to point out, this GYM D load tire (s) was made in Canada. Rather than down loading the coach, we filled the tire up, and could hear the air escaping and it did not come from the valve stem. The local tire company that is used was within two miles, the air easily stayed in the tire for over 20 minutes as we wanted to make sure it was a "loud" but slow leak. WE safely had no problem getting the A/S over to the tire company where we ended up replacing the D load GYM with Unicorn Master Tracks E loads due to that is all that was available at the time and as always it was 4PM. We ensured that dates on the other tires in which they being GYM made in Canada had a DOT 2609 with the exception of one having a 0400 date, which really caught us off guard. Needless to say, that one, on the same side was replaced as well.
I think speed had a lot to do with the fact we didn't have a blow out. Tempatures were in the low 60's with rain, so road conditions were not as hot as normal.
I'll let these sit on the AS over the winter and figure out what to to as we're not into it for allot of money compared to having a blow out and having a major repair. I just found it interesting that the GYM made in Canada lasted so long and did NOT rip apart as they have been known to do.
Maybe I'll see if they still have the E-loads made in Canada available as I did buy them back in Vermont in 2001, prior to switching out to a newer rim in which I obtained the D load set back in 2007.

Still way too long for tire life based on those dates so we were lucky and won't take it for granted again.

Best of luck in your choice, but do monitor those DOT dates regardless of how much tread is left on the tire.

SL4BLLT
Couple of questions. How long did you drive underinflated?
What speed were you driving at?
How much load was on the tire?
If you had a puncture, which is what it sounds like, what brand of tire do you recommend that will not be punctured?
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Old 10-23-2013, 03:15 AM   #130
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Those are pretty basic questions, so . . . ?
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Old 10-23-2013, 12:38 PM   #131
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Those are pretty basic questions, so . . . ?
Yes the questions are basic but I doubt that many could answer them correctly if they were in your place. The answers also impact the probability that some internal permanent structural damage might have been done to the tire by driving on it when it had lost some of its air.
For warranty purposes a loss of 20% is considered to be flat and driving on a flat can do serious damage to a tire.
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Old 10-23-2013, 12:52 PM   #132
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
Couple of questions. How long did you drive underinflated?
What speed were you driving at?
How much load was on the tire?
If you had a puncture, which is what it sounds like, what brand of tire do you recommend that will not be punctured?
"How long did you drive underinflated?" ANY answer given could be used to argue by a tire manufacturer to void warrantee.

"What speed were you driving at?" Again, ANY answer is wrong.

"How much load was on the tire?" Almost ANY weight is too much for an underinflated tire.

"If you had a puncture, which is what it sounds like, what brand of tire do you recommend that will not be punctured? Everyone knows there is none.

Tireman9, should your user name actually be "Lawyerman9"?
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Old 10-23-2013, 04:53 PM   #133
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Hi, from my personal experience, tire warranties are virtually non-existent unless maybe you paid extra for Road Hazard coverage. The only tires, of mine, that had began to fail [bubbles and separation, no flats or explosions] were my trailer tires and the only fault of mine was that I ran over something. B.S.
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Old 10-23-2013, 08:10 PM   #134
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Sorry for the delay in answering. I don't get on every day. In regards to the comments provided by the other folks, take them for how they can be applied. Here are the answers I can provide based on the one posted the scenario.

1. The tire pressure was checked prior to departing, so when we were notified by the other driver that we had an "issue" we drove another four miles to the exit. Keep in mind we did NOT know that the "issue" was a tire issue. When we went to put air in the tire, there was about 15lbs of air, we put 65lbs into it gradually and listened to it leak as in a possible crack sidewall, ie dry rot inside wall.
2. Speed was about 62 MPH as it was a nice beautiful day and as always when towing an Airstream always enjoyable.
3. Load on tire. Ummm let me think, 72 31 foot coach weighed last time empty about #5400. Most of the weight I would say is to the front tandem tire forward as even when we were pulling into the Shell station to refuel, the rear, rear tire was noticeably flat, however, nothing had separated tire wise. Again, we filled that tire up and drove it for about four miles to get it replaced and it maintained air until we reached our destination, towing at about 35 MPH. That is the great thing about owning a tandem axle Airstream.

The tire never shredded.

What tire would I recommend. Your call on what you can afford or your driving happens and area location demands are.

Jack's comments on his Marathon being a Canadian one, is great to hear. Many times it is assumed that a foreign made tire is always from China. Hearing that from him IRT to this discussion is good insight.

Hope it answers some questions, obviously will generate more, but I've got to get back to the World Series where Boston is doing great and it is only the second inning. Sorry about that, Jack, from STL. But again thanks for the advise on the Canadian made Marathons.

Safe travels to all and winterize those coaches as winter is coming quick this year with temps hitting 31 degrees here in the Sandhills of NC Saturday morning.

SL4BLLT
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Old 10-24-2013, 09:37 AM   #135
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"How long did you drive underinflated?" ANY answer given could be used to argue by a tire manufacturer to void warrantee.

"What speed were you driving at?" Again, ANY answer is wrong.

"How much load was on the tire?" Almost ANY weight is too much for an underinflated tire.

"If you had a puncture, which is what it sounds like, what brand of tire do you recommend that will not be punctured? Everyone knows there is none.

Tireman9, should your user name actually be "Lawyerman9"?
The intent of my post was to point out that unless you knew the answer to the questions you have no way to know if or how much damage was done to the tire before you discovered the air loss. Much damage is internal to the tire structure, so without x-ray examination or similar, it is very difficult if not impossible to know the level of damage.

In your original post you seemed to blame the tire brand for having the puncture. If I read that incorrectly I apologize for my error.

RE tire warranties: I do think there is a difference between how a major manufacturer handles warranties and a local seller of low cost imports. Few people consider the warranty or who is actually providing the warranty when they are making the original purchase.

RE turning down a tire claim. Unless you bought a road hazard warranty why should a tire company replace a tire that has had a puncture or impact or some other externally caused damage? If you have a fender bender do you expect Ford to pay for the repair? The biggest difference between tires and most car parts is that the average user does not have the knowledge or experience to properly analyze (autopsy) a failed tire while a failed part usually has some obvious visible damage.

The main reason I post the results of my autopsies on my blog, is to educate readers on some of the intricacies involved in proper diagnosis of a suspect failed tire. If there is a post you would like more information or details on please let me know and I will be happy to try and provide more information you need.

In closing, When you have a tire failure did you capture sharp, well lit pictures of the tire condition? Did you honestly look to see if there had been damage done to the tire hours, days or weeks prior to the failure? Did you make an effort to file a complaint with NHTSA and offer to make the pictures available for their examination?
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Old 10-24-2013, 10:24 AM   #136
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Yes the questions are basic but I doubt that many could answer them correctly if they were in your place. The answers also impact the probability that some internal permanent structural damage might have been done to the tire by driving on it when it had lost some of its air.
For warranty purposes a loss of 20% is considered to be flat and driving on a flat can do serious damage to a tire.
My chevy 3500HD service truck weighs 13k and the 225 70R 19.5 tires lasted 90k mi and 11yrs until they wore out with NO issues. The max inflation pressure on the sidewall is 95psi. I ran them 60psi front and 75psi in the rears as the door sticker recommends the whole time. 20% under sidewall max pressure must be a flat for inferior st tires. Load and tread wear is what determines inflation pressure.
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Old 10-24-2013, 10:33 AM   #137
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Originally Posted by Tireman9 View Post
The intent of my post was to point out that unless you knew the answer to the questions you have no way to know if or how much damage was done to the tire before you discovered the air loss. Much damage is internal to the tire structure, so without x-ray examination or similar, it is very difficult if not impossible to know the level of damage.

In your original post you seemed to blame the tire brand for having the puncture. If I read that incorrectly I apologize for my error.

RE tire warranties: I do think there is a difference between how a major manufacturer handles warranties and a local seller of low cost imports. Few people consider the warranty or who is actually providing the warranty when they are making the original purchase.

RE turning down a tire claim. Unless you bought a road hazard warranty why should a tire company replace a tire that has had a puncture or impact or some other externally caused damage? If you have a fender bender do you expect Ford to pay for the repair? The biggest difference between tires and most car parts is that the average user does not have the knowledge or experience to properly analyze (autopsy) a failed tire while a failed part usually has some obvious visible damage.

The main reason I post the results of my autopsies on my blog, is to educate readers on some of the intricacies involved in proper diagnosis of a suspect failed tire. If there is a post you would like more information or details on please let me know and I will be happy to try and provide more information you need.

In closing, When you have a tire failure did you capture sharp, well lit pictures of the tire condition? Did you honestly look to see if there had been damage done to the tire hours, days or weeks prior to the failure? Did you make an effort to file a complaint with NHTSA and offer to make the pictures available for their examination?
My point in my post was not to argue your questions, which I know are actually pertinent to the failure of the tire, but to illustrate that 99.9999+% of the tire users will not be able to answer them with any accuracy, and also to illustrate that if you have a failure, too bad in the opinion of the tire manufacturer.

The manufacturer can and will always come up with an excuse to say a failure was the user's fault, if nothing more than the old standby, "you hit something with it".

My opinion is all we as users can do is make sure we buy tires that are reported to have few failures, buy tires that are capable of the load we put on them, make sure they are properly inflated, and check them often. And even then many of the "ST" tires seem to separate for no obvious reason whatsoever. Just a month ago at a rally, I looked down at a friend's one year old Maxxis ST tire and saw that it was separating.

I actually have never had a trailer tire fail, however I live in fear of the day it will happen because I know what damage can be done to the trailer by the tire, and I have friends that have had many failures, one to the tune of $7,500 damage.
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Old 10-24-2013, 01:17 PM   #138
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to say it simply " any and all ST tires are garbage "
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Old 10-24-2013, 01:25 PM   #139
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to say it simply " any and all ST tires are garbage "
As were the firestone 500's.
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Old 10-24-2013, 01:57 PM   #140
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As were the firestone 500's.
Yep, when they started calling one of their first radials Firestone 500 , they ruined the good reputation that their 4 ply nylon "gum dipped" tubeless Firestone 500s had back in the sixtys .
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