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Old 03-02-2004, 04:37 PM   #15
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The goal in tightening your wheels is to get it tight to the hub and on the hub straight. The higher the pounds feet of pressure the more the lug is stretched. It's OK unless you stretch the lug beyond the breaking point. - Then your gonna have a day. --

If the application is even to start (suggest using a star patten on 5 lug or every other lug on 6 lug) then the wheel will go on straight and wheel wobble will only be from the hub not a misaligned wheel. Steel wheel torque can be from 80 to 100 pounds/feet. Any more and your headed down the road of more work. Any less and your headed down the same road for a different reason. If the torque from lug to lug or wheel to wheel is off by 10 and still with in those general parameters you should be good.

And it's more critical with non-steel wheels and/or disc brakes. A disc brake hub can be warped easier. It has less mass. And a non-steel wheel can be warped easier cause it's a softer material. It's also slighty more difficult in getting straight on the hub.

I use a beam type. The beam always zeros, and in the long run is more accruate. (In addition to being less upfront costs) I have had mine for 10 years +.

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Old 03-02-2004, 07:37 PM   #16
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Greetings.

I have been reading this thread with much interest. If I ever build that F16 that I have meaning to start, I'm calling Hohne for advice....

Over my 32 years of driving, I have had the misfortune to change many a tire on vehicles that were in my pocession. I have always followed the rule that upon replacing the wheel, you carefully snug each lug, in an alternateling pattern. Once the car is lowered from the jack, you would evenly tighten the lugs, following a pattern, and finally giving each lug a good"yank", replace hub-cap(if it's one that wasn't stolen in Chicago).

I have not had a wheel come flying off while driving.

My point is that it seems you can make use of a torque wrench, especially if you are doing engine work, but, as Jaco questioned, just how necessary is this, IF we use common-sense and if you are just tightening up the lugs on the AS. I have all intentions to check my nuts every couple of dozen miles for the first 500 miles, and make any adjustments as needed. Or I'll have my wife check my nuts!

Besides, I'd rather use the 50 bucks to start stocking the bar in the Bambi!!!!

Jonathan
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Old 03-02-2004, 07:50 PM   #17
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While I haven't used a torque wrench on my aluminum wheels, I have checked them off and on after repacking wheelbearings this past summer. I continue to use a beam type 1/2" torque wrench on everything automotive and feel comfortable with it. Last year I bought a "new style" 3/8" torque wrench because I needed a measurement in in. lbs. and my son has a 1/2" torque wrench in the new style which I have tried. They seem nice but I still feel that I am getting accurate torque readings until proven wrong by one of my smart kids. You know it is bound to happen one of these days!
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Old 03-02-2004, 09:08 PM   #18
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I use a 'click' type torque wrench. I tighten the lug nuts similar to an engine head, opposing/alternating the sequence, not going around the 'circle' one by one.
Also, slowly bring each nut to maximum torque. I was taught to never tighten one all the way and then go to the next.
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Old 03-02-2004, 09:30 PM   #19
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Good point Ed. I'm surprised at how many people I have seen tightening lug nut in a circle rather than the sequence shown in the owner's manual. I had to pull an engine and transmission out of one of my wife's cars before, put in a throwout bearing and send the heads out to be reworked because of burned valves. Obviously the heads are bolted back on in a certain sequence as is the intake manifold. Those projects gave me a better appreciation for torque wrenches and service manuals.

On the flip side, 2 weeks after I got everything back together, my wife parked her car on a steep hill, the brake somehow released and the car jumped out of gear (I didn't fool with the brakes now). The car jumped a curb and hit a pool house which stopped it from going into a person's pool. Insurance totalled it and the wife cried because it was her first car after graduating from nursing school.
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Old 03-02-2004, 10:34 PM   #20
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Thumbs up Very timely thread ...

I have a Sears click type torque wrench ... but it tops out at 75 foot pounds. The manual calls for 85 foot pounds for my aluminum wheels (95 if you have steel).

I checked them the other day ... and everything was nice and tight at 75 ... but I'm wondering if I should get a new wrench and run the wheels at 85. How critical is this?
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Old 03-03-2004, 07:02 AM   #21
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Porky,

<I really am not an*l-retentive about this, but people asked...>

When mine were loose, they were below 75...they were a quarter to half turn away from 85...they were between snug and torqued. Your wrench at 75 would find the loose ones...

If you come to the Midwest Rally, I will check your wheels <grin>

If I did not already have a torque wrench, I would borrow one to get the lugs to a settling place, where they quit moving around on me. I am sure it has a lot to do with the ambient temperature going from zero to 60 in about three weeks, herabouts. Tire pressure is another headache...

But I only worry about the torque wrench because they are aluminum wheels, and they need to have consistent torque on the lugs...the only reason I have it is because of a cyclinder head on my older brother's truck several years ago...

I am a big, clumsy guy, and I know I would have no luck using a beam-type. I would slip off and scratch it...many would have no problems getting a consistent torque outta them...

I guess if you have something, use it, and if you buy one, get the clicky kind...

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Old 03-03-2004, 07:13 AM   #22
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Not knowing anything about it (other than what I've learned from hohne) the click type sounds much easier for me. I usually have a hard time trying to do two things at once ... not having to look at the dial at the same time your're trying to pull hard slowly with one hand sounds like a big plus.
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Old 03-03-2004, 09:59 PM   #23
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Stephen,
I find myself lowering my head to check the reading on the scale to assure proper torque value. The clicky kind, as hohne refers to it, can be used while closing your eyes as you put a little grunt into it. If your hearing is gone, you can still feel the clicks through the handle.
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Old 03-04-2004, 06:59 AM   #24
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...yeah, my shoulder pops about 70 ft-pounds, so I know I am getting close...

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Old 03-26-2004, 12:51 PM   #25
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Just have to repeat the warning to check those lug nuts! I just checked them after about the first 80 miles and none of the lugs were at the right torque. So if you have a new coach- CHECK 'EM!
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Old 03-26-2004, 03:27 PM   #26
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In trying to install the hateful Trailer Keeper theft guard, I stripped one of the nuts. IT seems to be of a very soft metal. I wonder if this is by intent, so these threads strip rather than the bolt. If the bolt is stripped, what are my options? Can a bolt be easily replaced? or can I re-thread it? This brings up the jack-point issue, does it matter if the TT is hooked up to the tow vehicle or not when jacking it up? How stable is the trailer when jacked up from the jack point? Thanks for the help.
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Old 03-26-2004, 04:15 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally posted by frozen chosen
In trying to install the hateful Trailer Keeper theft guard, I stripped one of the nuts. IT seems to be of a very soft metal. I wonder if this is by intent, so these threads strip rather than the bolt. If the bolt is stripped, what are my options? Can a bolt be easily replaced? or can I re-thread it? This brings up the jack-point issue, does it matter if the TT is hooked up to the tow vehicle or not when jacking it up? How stable is the trailer when jacked up from the jack point? Thanks for the help.
Frozen... I don't know what a Trailer Keeper is... what nut did you strip, and what bolts are you talking about? Lug nuts and studs or something else altogether?

Regarding the jack point, the stability of the jack depends on how stable the ground under the trailer is to begin with. It will probably be more stable when hitched simply because you can set the brakes on the tow vehicle, and it's weight will hold the trailer in place and keep it from rolling rather than just the tongue jack and tire blocks.

If you use weight distribution, you might consider disconnecting the WD bars prior to jacking the trailer up to take the WD weight from the tow vehicle off the trailer frame. Your jack won't have as much weight to lift that way.

Roger
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Old 03-26-2004, 04:27 PM   #28
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Stripped nuts?

Hope you are talking about lug nuts!

A lug nut is weaker metal than a lug bolt. And lug bolt can be changed. A hydrallic press is best to have when doing that operation. Can be done with a hammer and grunt power, not recommended. So based on that description it's not the easiest. NEVER RE-THREAD! Nuts or lugs.

Moral, ....pay attention when screwing nuts. If done in haste or incorrectly the net result will be painful.

Recommend always lifting a trailer with a jack with out the tow vehicle attached. The tow vehicle will limit the movement of the trailer. And always do this on a smooth hard surface away from traffic. ............. And you could drive your double axle trailer on blocks of wood. (2"X6") One tire on the blocks and the flat one hangs in the air. In this case leave the tow vechile attached to the trailer for stablilty.

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