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Old 03-05-2011, 07:23 AM   #1
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1998 25' Safari
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LT truck tires vs trailer tires

Give advice or direct me to a thread that might educate me

Thanks in advance
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Old 03-05-2011, 07:27 AM   #2
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Here is a good thread.

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f465...res-69297.html
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Old 03-05-2011, 08:09 AM   #3
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what size trailer? I run 15" LT tires on my trailer that weighs 5800 lbs on the axles. tires rated for 2000 each so there is plenty of capacity. I have about 50,000 on these with no problems. But I bought a heavier trailer, 32 feet, and could not find any LT 15" tires that gave me enough capacity with some safety margin, so I went with the ST tires.
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Old 03-06-2011, 09:43 AM   #4
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Bill M

Mine is 1998, 27', safari, 7300gvwr--never been on road with her. Need to replace tires before I do. I'm a newbie by the way.

Any suggestions
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Old 03-06-2011, 10:12 AM   #5
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Jerry,
I have a '72 Ambassador with #7,100 gvwr. When I buy new tires I am putting on these.
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Old 03-06-2011, 10:51 PM   #6
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Jerry,
I have a '72 Ambassador with #7,100 gvwr. When I buy new tires I am putting on these.
I think trailer tires are a better bet due to the stiffer sidewalls to cut down on sway!

TIRE SPECIFICATIONS

Proper wheel selection is a very important component of your trailer gear system. When replacing your trailer tires and trailer rims it is critical that the proper size and load range be selected in order to match the load requirements of the trailer. The following characteristics are extremely important and should be thoroughly checked when replacing trailer tires.
  • TIRE CONSTRUCTION TYPE - Bias Ply vs. Radial
  • TIRE APPLICATION TYPE - (ST) Special Trailer vs. (P) Passenger Car
  • TIRE SIZE - % of section height / section width Refereed to as 'Aspect Ratio'
  • TIRE LOAD RANGE - Load carrying capacity and air pressure rating
  • RIM SIZE - Diameter and width must match tire
  • RIM BOLT CIRCLE - Diameter of bolt circle must match hub
Quite often consumers are uncertain how to read or interpret specifications on a tire side wall. This problem is compounded by the Trailer Tire Industry's use of three different size identification systems on trailer tires. The following are examples and explanations of tire code.
  • THE NUMERIC SYSTEM - (4.80 X 8) mostly used on smaller trailer tires, indicates the tire section width (4.80"), and the rim diameter (8")
  • THE ALPHA NUMERIC SYSTEM - (B78 X 13 C) common on 13"-15" trailer tires, indicates air chamber size (B), the 'Aspect Ratio' (78), the rim diameter (13"), and the load range (C)
  • THE METRIC SYSTEM - (ST205 75D 15) currently being phased in by trailer tire manufacturers, indicated the tire application type (ST-special trailer), the section width (205mm), the 'Aspect Ratio' (75), the construction type (D= bias ply), and rim dia.(15")
Proper trailer rim selection is also important to assure replacement wheels will match your existing trailer hardware. Be certain to match your wheel 'bolt circle' pattern to the axle hub. The bolt circle is determined as follows:

Tire 'load range', or the maximum weight each tire can safely support, must be considered when selecting the proper size tire for your application. The load range and maximum weight capacity are indicated on the tire side wall.
  • LOAD RANGE B = OLD 4 PLY RATING
  • LOAD RANGE C = OLD 6 PLY RATING
  • LOAD RANGE D = OLD 8 PLY RATING
WHY SPECIAL TRAILER 'ST' TIRES?

Eastern Marine carries a full line of nylon bias ply trailer tires. These 'Special Trailer' (ST) tires have been constructed for better high speed durability and bruise resistance under heavy loads. Trailer tire construction varies substantially from automotive tires, therefore it is essential to choose the correct tire for your towing application. In general, trailer tires have the same load range (or ply) from bead to bead and are bias ply construction. This allows for a stiffer side wall which provides safer towing by helping to reduce trailer sway problems. The use of 'Passenger Car' (P) tires a on a trailer is not recommended because their construction, usually radial or bias belted, allows for more flexible side walls. This could lead to increased trailer sway and loss of control.

Tire 'inflation pressure' is also an important factor in proper handling as well as tire life. Maximum inflation pressure is indicated on the tire side wall and should always be checked when the tire is cold before operation.
Finally, an important safety procedure is to apply and maintain proper 'lug torque' on trailer rims. Too little torque may cause the wheel to wobble or fall off. Wheel nuts/bolts should be torqued after each wheel removal, retorque after 50 miles and frequently thereafter. Follow the manufacturers recommended torque pattern:
Use 60 cone angle zinc plated nuts or lug bolts initially tighten to 12-20 ft. lbs. using a cross tightening sequence (1,3,2,4 or 1,3,2,5,4). Finish torquing to 70-80 ft. lbs. (NOTE: Nuts and studs should be clean, dry and not lubricated.) Retorque after 50 miles of use and frequently thereafter.
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Old 03-07-2011, 08:26 AM   #7
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Certainly ST tire specifications are better for a trailer than the LT tires. Im my mind the LT tire is a slight compromise on a trailer with small wheels. But the rub is that the reputation of ST tires is that they can be defective and have poorer quality control than the major brands of LT tires. Nothing you can do in terms of checking pressures, etc. can rule out the possibility of a poorly made tire blowing. I hope the GYM's have imporved over the ones they made when they first went to China. I have a set on my larger trailer. Airstream offers 16 inch wheels with LT tires for their trailers now as an option. The main problem with using LT tires on 15 inch wheels is the weight capacity.
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Old 03-07-2011, 08:58 AM   #8
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This is from Dexter's Manual page 73:
http://dexteraxle.com/i/u/1080235/f/...anual_9-10.pdf

Tires
Before mounting tires onto the wheels, make certain that the rim size and contour is approved for the tire as shown in the Tire and Rim Association Yearbook or the tire manufacturers catalog. Also make sure the tire will carry the rated load. If the load is not equal on all tires due to trailer weight distribution, use the tire rated for the heaviest wheel position.
Note: The capacity rating molded into the sidewall of the tire is not always the proper rating for the tire if used in a trailer application. Use the following guidelines:
1. LT and ST tires. Use the capacity rating molded into the tire. 2. Passenger Car Tires. Use the capacity rating molded into
the tire sidewall divided by 1.10 for trailer use. Use tire mounting procedures as outlined by the Rubber
Manufacturer’s Association or the tire manufacturers.
Tire inflation pressure is the most important factor in tire life. Inflation pressure should be as recommended by the manufacturer for the load. Pressure should be checked cold before operation. Do not bleed air from tires when they are hot. Check inflation pressure weekly during use to insure the maximum tire life and tread wear. The following tire wear diagnostic chart will help you pinpoint the causes and solutions of tire wear problems.
CAUTION
Proper matching of the tire/wheel combination is essential to proper function of your trailer running gear. Some tires may call for a maximum inflation pressure above the rim or wheel capacity. DO NOT EXCEED MAXIMUM INFLATION PRESSURES FOR RIMS OR WHEELS. Catastrophic failure may result.
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