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Old 04-12-2015, 12:42 AM   #71
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Bottom line is that here in the US the vehicle owner has the right to modify their vehicle. Now the smart thing to do is to be sure any replacement part is equal or better than the OE. For tires that IMO that means equal of higher load and or speed capability as well as longer MFG warranty. I have written detailed instructions on the steps needed to ensure you are in fact getting more load and speed capability.
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Old 04-12-2015, 06:50 AM   #72
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Originally Posted by BlackAces View Post
The problem with your reference is how did it happen? Was the trailer owner the major contributor responsible for that tire's condition?

Without some sort of expert forensic proof of cause, you may just be showing a tire severely abused.

Here is another example. The condition is normal for severely abused tires on RV trailers.

DSCN0114_1_1 - iRV2.com RV Photo Gallery

BA
So why don't LT tires do that?
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:30 AM   #73
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I have been using LT tires on trailers for over 30 years. I imagine I have about 80 of them sitting on the ground right now.

Even if I thought the wear characteristics of ST tires were acceptable, (I don't) my experience with LT tires says they perform very very well in trailer service.


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Old 04-12-2015, 04:54 PM   #74
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Iím not a champion of ST tires over LT tires. Both have their special niche in the global tire market. They most often get compared with each other because they - like many other tires - look alike.

Itís been my observation that both designs - when used in their niche - will perform to their manufacturers expectations. Misuse and abuse is their primary cause of early failures. Knowing and operating each tire design within the parameters they are designed to operate in is paramount.

The heyday for LT tires being used on RV trailer axles was in years 2004 and 2005. Again, my observation was that they suffered much the same failure rate as ST tires were to later suffer on the same sized axle loads.
The most obvious success for the LT tires used to replace ST tires is when they have exceeded the ST tires load capacity. For instance, the LT235/85R16E has great success when used as a replacement for ST tires on 5200# GAWR axles. It leaves one to wonder if the ST235/80R16D would have had equal success in the same situation.

I spout a lot about the governing bodyís regulations and tire industry standards in my posts. Without one knowing the safety factors one cannot apply them. I can post a half dozen current references that say - in part - replacement tires must have equal/greater size and load capacity as the OE tires. And Iíll always get some negative response to that fact. Even from those that are using such tire replacements.
Fitment for RV trailer axles do not require load capacity reserves via vehicle manufacturer recommended inflation pressures. Automotive industry tire fitments do.

Getting too long, Iíll quit.


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Old 04-12-2015, 05:30 PM   #75
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Tire Details - Discount Tire Direct

Not my first choice...but good enough OEM for vintage TTs...
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Old 04-12-2015, 05:34 PM   #76
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Why I dont like trailer tires. (Taken from the Discount Tire website)


"Mileage;

Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.

The life of a trailer tire is limited by time and duty cycles.

The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles."

http://m.discounttire.com/dtcs/infoTrailerTireFacts.dos



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Old 04-12-2015, 06:25 PM   #77
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Read much about ensuring that tires are inflated to tire pressure listed on side of tire when cold. How much can one allow the pressure to increase due to traveling in hot weather without worry of over-inflation?


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Old 04-12-2015, 06:34 PM   #78
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Magic Carpet - I'm not a tire expert but asked that same question here: http://www.airforums.com/forums/f438...nt-119498.html

I learned that a 10% increase in pressure and 30% increase in temp above ambient (according to TPMS measurements) is fairly standard though everyone's mileage varies.
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Old 04-12-2015, 07:07 PM   #79
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Read much about ensuring that tires are inflated to tire pressure listed on side of tire when cold. How much can one allow the pressure to increase due to traveling in hot weather without worry of over-inflation?


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You inflate the tire when its cold and don't worry about it, why would you check it when its hot? You never need to check hot pressure as far as I know, unless it looks low.
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Old 04-13-2015, 07:02 AM   #80
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Quote:
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So why don't LT tires do that?
Quote:
Originally Posted by r carl View Post
You inflate the tire when its cold and don't worry about it, why would you check it when its hot? You never need to check hot pressure as far as I know, unless it looks low.
I'm combining these 2 posts to answer them in one post.

First, I think there are several reasons why LT appear not to do that.

1) In every instance I have observed, the replacement LT tire size has gone up - and that equates to an increase in load carrying capacity. The rated load is specific to the type of service and the way ST tires and LT tires are rated is different (with the ST tire being rated at a higher load for the same dimensions)

2) ST tires are built by oh, I call them 3rd tier tire manufacturers (with 2 exceptions). I am sure these guys aren't at the cutting edge of tire technology and I wonder what these guy's LT tires would do. I never find out the answer to that question.

3) Then there is the issue of failure rate. If the actual failure rate is on the order of 10% (probably high), then there is a very large population of people (90%) who will never perceive a problem.

Put another way, if a person were to replace 4 tires, of which one was a failure, with 4 new ones, the odds are they will not experience a second failure. Of course, that person will have difficulty understanding that and will insist that any change they made was the difference.

Now, I am NOT saying that ST tires are equivalent or better than LT tires. I am saying there is a lot going on here and it can be difficult to sort this all out. I am merely pointing out what I perceive to be differences.

- AND -

One of the keys in trying to sort out this complex situation is pressure buildup. Pressure buildup is a way of determining if the load carrying capacity is adequate.

So if the pressure buildup for an ST tire (or any tire for that matter) exceeds 15%, then a failure is likely and it would be due to overload/underinflation/excessive speed and not the manufacturer's design or a defect or the type of tire (ST vs LT).
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Old 04-13-2015, 10:12 AM   #81
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I not sure, but i think there is a tire thread every day. The topic, no matter what the OP was, always ends up the same, LT vs ST with a few P tires. I can't help wondering, is everyone changing rims? When I am on the road, will evey AS I see have either new 16's or a torn up fender? I began to look at pic's, on this forum, just to see the wheels. A few, maybe 1/10 (did'nt actually count), seem to have new wheels. Most are appear to be stock, slots or steel. Before everyone atacks, I'm not saying anyone is wrong, we should all do whatever makes us worry less. My point is, as you read these arguments, it makes you wonder how many are really worried about this. Is it just the same 25 +- people, myself included, arguing about tires while the rest are out enjoying their AS, with whatever tires the store had when they bought some? If I get any damage to my AS, no matter the cause, it will make me mad. I will claim it, fix it, and move on. I keep thinking about tires, but the only damage I've ever had was hail on my '69. I should be thinking about a building or carport, but then it would hail at the campground! I dont think I can win! Lucky I have insurance!
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Old 04-14-2015, 08:04 AM   #82
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LT Tire questions

Has anyone noticed a reduction in fuel mileage with the Michelin 235/75/15 LTX since max tire pressure is 50 psi and ST tires are 65 to 80 psi ? Second question is, do rib tires on a trailer have traction issues in light snow? The Yokohama RY-215 is a D rated 15 inch LT rib tire rated at 2,040 pounds at 65 psi. Seems to me this would be an ideal tire, but not sure because I'm no expert.
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Old 04-14-2015, 09:29 AM   #83
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Tireman9 wanted me to post a link to his website that has some great images of temperature variation:

RV Tire Safety: What do you think about temperature guns? Part 1

Enjoy
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Old 04-14-2015, 09:31 AM   #84
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Has anyone noticed a reduction in fuel mileage with the Michelin 235/75/15 LTX since max tire pressure is 50 psi and ST tires are 65 to 80 psi ? Second question is, do rib tires on a trailer have traction issues in light snow? The Yokohama RY-215 is a D rated 15 inch LT rib tire rated at 2,040 pounds at 65 psi. Seems to me this would be an ideal tire, but not sure because I'm no expert.

Are you referring to the passenger version of the LTX design?
P235/75R15 XL tire I hope you didn't forget to de-rate the load capacity of those tires by dividing by 1.1

Obviously you should not be comparing tires with such large load capacity differences as a LR-E ST or LT tire with a XL Passenger tire.

RE rib and snow traction. For driving traction block shoulder patterns are definitely better than solid shoulder rib patterns. BUY are you towing through fresh deep snow or wet slush on a highway? In that case only braking is affected and many times the slush has already been cleared away by the tires in front

The Yokohama RY-215 is not an All Season design (ie no claims for good snow traction) so only you know what kind of snow covered road you tow on.
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