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Old 06-05-2018, 10:22 AM   #1
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How long should you run 16" Michelins?

I have a 2015 International Serenity 27FB that I bought new with upgraded factory 16" wheels and Michelin LTX tires, instead of the standard GoodYear 15" trailer tires.

All of my tires look like brand new. My trailer has been stored in covered parking for the last year but was stored outside in previous years. This year the tires will be 4 years old in the fall.

How long do most of you go before changing tires? I know that the tread wear will be fine but I am worried about stress aging from holding all that weight especially when it was exposed to the elements.
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Old 06-05-2018, 10:32 AM   #2
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5 years for me. But I have 15” Michelin tires
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Old 06-05-2018, 11:17 AM   #3
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Check them for dry rot that might help you decide .
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Old 06-05-2018, 11:40 AM   #4
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Only problem is that external condition does not necessarily indicate internal condition...and in my case, the outside of the tires looks 'fine', but I have not crawled under to inspect the inside (under the AS) of the tires--they have been covered continuously, but my covers do not protect the backside of the tires.

Who knows what's going on where I'm not looking...
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Old 06-05-2018, 11:45 AM   #5
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I just bought a 2014 Eddie Bauer and have the same question.
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Old 06-05-2018, 12:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodfox45 View Post
Check them for dry rot that might help you decide .
I don't know what you mean by dry rot. My tires are made of rubber not wood.

I don't think any kind of fungus could grow in my environment. We live at 8000 ft elevation and it is extremely dry.
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Old 06-05-2018, 12:57 PM   #7
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From Goodyear re: when to replace RV tires:

https://www.goodyearrvtires.com/tire...uidelines.aspx

Not particularly helpful other than enumerate the relevant factors, plus, remember Goodyear and other vendors have a vested interest in selling more tires.

On the other hand, if you have a single axle trailer, tire failure is more consequential than dual or triple axle.
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Old 06-05-2018, 01:37 PM   #8
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From the Michelin web site:
https://www.michelinman.com/US/en/he...new-tires.html


Still a guess but somewhere between 5 and 10 years.


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Old 06-05-2018, 01:51 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVDreamer View Post
I don't know what you mean by dry rot. My tires are made of rubber not wood.

I don't think any kind of fungus could grow in my environment. We live at 8000 ft elevation and it is extremely dry.
They dry out and crack look at the sidewalls for cracks .
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Old 06-05-2018, 07:17 PM   #10
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RVDreamer... 'dry rot' is a common term where the side walls of the tire have cracks and hard rubber parts crumbling off. It is common with farm trailers parked in the field in the grass and wet environment... snow, rain, evening moisture coming to the surface. Not that big of a deal for you, unless the wet environment.

They have a grey look to the exterior and chalky in appearance. Not black. Once you have seen dry rot, you will never forget. Much like a discarded tire along the highway and laying flat, exposed to the sun is the most extreme. We have several tire experts on the Forums who can give better descriptions.

We have Michelins on a Toyota Land Cruiser, new tires purchased 10-3-2012 with 20,082 miles and today have 52,365 miles. Garaged, 32,000 miles and going strong with impressive amount of tread remaining. This is the P 18" and not LTX 18" Michelin. These will be around for some time.

High elevation sunlight will do a tire in faster than wearing them out do to use. Look at tires at a RV Park where they did not cover the tires for protection.

My 2014 International 25 foot with the 16" LTX225 since April 2016. Not one problem or complaint. Rub your hand over the sidewall of the tire and some black should come off and feel smooth. Feel for a rough surface. Mine look black, not faded to charcoal or grey, and still have the fresh rubber look since purchase. A tire shop can examine them and give you specific information on yours.

I expect ours to last five to ten years, at least. These tires will not wear out, but would eventually weather out. Stored in our RV Garage... I expect ten years, or longer. I am very conscious about checking these tires to extend their life on the trailer.

Once you see what 'dry rot' looks like... you will be pleased with your tires. I have yet to own a vehicle that the tires weathered out, but I wore the tread down and would replace before the winter snows arrived in Colorado. Years never was an issue... just miles.
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Old 06-05-2018, 07:27 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVDreamer View Post
I don't know what you mean by dry rot. My tires are made of rubber not wood.

I don't think any kind of fungus could grow in my environment. We live at 8000 ft elevation and it is extremely dry.
Here’s a pic if dry rotted tire
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Old 06-05-2018, 11:16 PM   #12
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That same type of cracking (dry rotting) can occur on other parts of the tire side wall or in between the tire treads. Once this is visible it is time to head to the tire shop.


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Old 06-06-2018, 09:43 AM   #13
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RV tires can look great on the outside but "dry rot or degrade" from the inside as well. This is caused by heat and the sun. I always replace between years 5 and 6. Having one come apart at 60 mph will do more damage to the trailer than a set of four new tires. I'm speaking from experience.
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Old 06-06-2018, 10:19 AM   #14
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What's really going on in so-called "dry rot" in tires is that the rubber compound is breaking down. Tire rubber also contains oils and waxes mixed into the rubber material. These compounds are used to insure the rubber stays flexible, resists ultraviolet light, ozone, heat, flexing, and all the other things that tires go through. A tire on a regularly-driven vehicle gets warmed up, flexes, and the protective materials disperse and migrate throughout the tire body and tread area and help protect the rubber. A well-maintained, quality tire can last many years and give full rated mileage (or better) under regular use.

In a trailer, or other situation where the vehicle is NOT regularly driven on the road, the compounds evaporate from the tire surface or are broken down by ultraviolet light and ozone exposure. The rubber stiffens, cracks, and breaks down prematurely. The tire deteriorates rapidly, and does not deliver full mileage or life. I had this happen on the passenger side of a GMC van that had a rather expensive set of Michelin tires on it. The van was parked unmoving, for about a year, with the passenger side toward the sun, tires uncovered, in the high desert sunshine. The 'dry rot' was substantial, and the passenger side tires both failed early. There was tons of tread on the tires, but the cracking (much worse than the picture) led to many slow leaks to the point that I was able to only make it to a tire store for replacements without going totally flat on one side...

Bottom line is cover the tires, exercise them regularly if possible, and be prepared to replace them well before they wear out...a rule of thumb is 5-6 years, be ready to spend the $$...

We have also had the "more damage than the tires would have cost to replace" syndrome. Was not pretty, and caused a ton of damage...since our AS is dual axle, the only indication of trouble was tread and tire chunks, smoke, and AS bits and pieces trailing behind that my son happened to notice in his mirror on a curve. (Yes, a TPMS is now on the list...)
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