Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 04-21-2005, 06:50 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
2003 25' Safari
Eden Prairie , Minnesota
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 765
Images: 3
Hot Tires

On my last trip when I stopped at gas stations I felt the trailer tires with my hand. The front tires felt warmer than the rear. I had set the tire pressures at 65 psi before leaving. The trailer tows just a hair nose low - which I am assuming is the problem. The tow vehicle seems about level. I'm thinking that if I adjust the hitch one notch higher the trailer may ride a tad nose high, but I still need to try it. Other ideas?
__________________

__________________
Dan
dmac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2005, 06:56 PM   #2
Aluminut
 
Silvertwinkie's Avatar
 
2004 25' Safari
. , Illinois
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 10,334
I'm not really sure. I too had it off a bit and did not have any additional heat between the two axles. I would adjust it and see what happens. In the manual, it shows the tow vehicle a bit lower in the back, while the coach is darn near level.

Also check the hubs. Stick your finger in the holes in the rim to the hub and see if those are any warmer. They will be warmer if you just did some braking.
__________________

__________________
Computers manufactured by companies such as IBM, Compaq and millions of others are by far the most popular with about 70 million machines in use worldwide. Macintosh fans note that cockroaches are far more numerous than humans and that numbers alone do not denote a higher life form. -NY Times 11/91
Silvertwinkie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2005, 08:05 PM   #3
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 261
Images: 14
way to accurately check tire/hub temp

Look at this infared thermometer. Just point laser at the tire and read the temp.

http://www.tooldesk.com/shop/raytekmt4.wml

I use it to check the temp of the TV tires as well as the Airstream tire and hub temp at each gas stop. Works great. Tires run around 100 degrees on warm days. 90 degrees in cooler or wet weather.
__________________
bjond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2005, 08:36 PM   #4
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Spies
Look at this infared thermometer. Just point laser at the tire and read the temp.

http://www.tooldesk.com/shop/raytekmt4.wml

I use it to check the temp of the TV tires as well as the Airstream tire and hub temp at each gas stop. Works great. Tires run around 100 degrees on warm days. 90 degrees in cooler or wet weather.
I have one of those, and recommend it. A 9 volt battery lasts a couple of years, although it would be better to leave the battery out if you are not going to use it for extended periods, to keep corrosion to a minimum.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2005, 08:38 PM   #5
Rivet Master
 
66Overlander's Avatar
 
1962 22' Safari
2016 30' Classic
Somewhere , in the USA
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 1,981
Images: 41
I wouldn't be surprised that the hotter front tires are caused by the unlevel towing.

With the H2 as our tow vehicle, we can't get a long enough hitch drop shank to get our trailer quite level (the front is high by an inch or two) and the rear tires always run a bit hotter than the front for us. So far it hasn't been a problem, but this year I intend to go to a scale just to make sure the weight on the rear tires is still within specification. If not, I'll probably have to go get a custom hitch made to get the trailer level (or I guess I could put new axles on the trailer with a greater angle to raise it up). I will admit that knowing we don't tow quite level is one reason I keep our top speed to only about 60mph. The faster you go, the more the tires carrying the higher load will heat up.

I think the closest you'll get to having the trailer level is an inch or so unless you have a custom hitch made. I doubt that an inch either way would overload your tires, though they will run a bit hotter.
__________________
Joe
Wally Byam Caravan Club International Historian
Vintage Airstream Club Historian
WBCCI/VAC #6768

(Looking for a vintage 1960's fiberglass front window guard)
66Overlander is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2005, 10:16 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
dscluchfc's Avatar
 
1984 31' Excella
Abernathy , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 849
I am curious how the tire temps can only be about 100 on warm days?
When it is "warm" in Texas, air temps can be 90 or above. When it is "hot" in Texas over 100 degrees, pavement temps in the 150-200 degree range are easily achievable. Wouldn't the tire temps have to be elevated in this same range as well?
I know mine are hot enough in the summer that you can't hold your hand on them.
__________________
David
TAC # TX-18

AIR # 410
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsphotoscapes
dscluchfc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 07:20 AM   #7
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
Rivet

Quote:
Originally Posted by dscluchfc
I am curious how the tire temps can only be about 100 on warm days?
When it is "warm" in Texas, air temps can be 90 or above. When it is "hot" in Texas over 100 degrees, pavement temps in the 150-200 degree range are easily achievable. Wouldn't the tire temps have to be elevated in this same range as well?
I know mine are hot enough in the summer that you can't hold your hand on them.
I am sure Herb is going from his own experience, if you want to find out more about tires than you ever wanted to know, go to www.tiresafety.com
While most items there deal with normal automotive tire issues, there is still a lot of good content for the rest of us, umm, "non-normal" users.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 07:43 AM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Cracker's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
Pittsfield , Maine
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,099
Using the infrared temperature gauge recommended above, I have found that the curbside front trailer tire is always a couple of degrees warmer than the others. This has been consistant enough that I'm now convinced it's due to the heat from the diesel exhaust on the TV. What I look for with the gauge is a noticeable "difference" in the temp of any particular tire relative to its running mates - i.e., all duals should be the same temp, all trailer tires should be the same temp, and lastly, both front wheels should be the same. I also do a quick check of the hub temperatures. This is a great little gadget and I've made its use almost mandatory at every stop.

I have not found a great deal of temperature spread between tires on the "sunny" side of the vehicle and those running in the shade - with respect to North-South trips. As to average temperatures, I've seldom observed temps much higher than 110 deg - and most of the time they're in the 90's. It must be due to the passing air cooling the tires. If we conducted a survey on this factoid it might prove interesting. I'm thinking that, the more heavily loaded the tire, the greater the flex, and the higher the temperature. This could possibly explain why some people have a lot of tire troubles while others seldom have any.
__________________
Cracker

2003 GMC 3500 D/A, CC, LB, 4x4 and 2000 Airstream Excella 30. WBCCI 7074
Cracker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 07:49 AM   #9
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 261
Images: 14
the warm day was

Temps quoted were from a sunny day and a cloudy rainy day on a recent trip to Ohio and back. Air temp ranged from 60 to 80 degrees. Tires will get hotter in the summer and in Texas, I'm sure.
__________________
bjond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 08:08 AM   #10
Rivet Master
 
dscluchfc's Avatar
 
1984 31' Excella
Abernathy , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 849
The greater the flex in a tire when loaded, the higher the running temp.
Tire pressure is the key. Underinflated tires run much hotter than properly inflated tires. If your trailer is max loaded at GVWR, then your tires need to be inflated to near max cold inflated rating for best tire performance.
__________________
David
TAC # TX-18

AIR # 410
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsphotoscapes
dscluchfc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-22-2005, 08:33 PM   #11
4 Rivet Member
 
WayWard Wind's Avatar
 
2004 25' Safari
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 424
Dan, I'm also towing an 04- 25' (twin) & like yours I appear to be a tad low at the hitch point. Since we plan on some serious travling this year I need to do the right thing & get some weight factors, so I know where I'm at regarding the total weight thing. I feel that I might have to set the angle of the hitch a notch higher, to bring the nose up to where I feel it should be. Then again I have never found any of the hubs or tires as being hot, even when I had no grease or bearing left . What W/D are you using? I'm using the Reese HP Dual Cam & in talking with the Reese Techs this weeks, they recommended that I go with 800# bars, although they SAID the 1200# that I'm currently using SHOULD be fine.
Best,
__________________
Home of the Wayward Wind

Bogfrog & Mr. Turbo

If in life you stumble, make it part of the dance
WayWard Wind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2005, 07:58 AM   #12
Rivet Master
 
2003 25' Safari
Eden Prairie , Minnesota
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 765
Images: 3
The trailer tire pressures were set corrrectly using a digital tire gauge. The trailer was not nearly at gross weight - empty tanks and minimal gear for a 4 day trip. The difference in tire temperatures front-to-rear was very noticable to my hand.

I am using the Equal-i-zer hitch. It is rated at 1000 lb max tongue weight (the next lower is 600 lb, which is too light).

The tow vehicle (2002 Ford Explorer V8) rides level, so I don't want to adjust the weight distribution bars to level the trailer - I think that will just convert a nose-low trailer problem into a tail-high Explorer problem! I will see if the hitch shank will allow me to raise the trailer one notch (ie: has one more hole), otherwise I will need to purchase a shorter shank.

I have not weighed the trailer/TV... where could I get this done wheel-by-wheel?
__________________
Dan
dmac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2005, 09:07 AM   #13
Moderator Emeritus
 
Pick's Avatar
 
1972 31' Sovereign
High Springs , Florida
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 2,310
Images: 36
Send a message via AIM to Pick
One thing I noticed is bias ply tires run hotter than radials. My Airstream weighs in at aroound 7000 lbs total, and the tires seem to run quite warm. I also have an 18' flatbed with Goodyear Marathon Radials, same size as the Airstream tires. I hauled my large John Deere tractor with this trailer to Florida from Ohio, in July last year. I noted that the Goodyears ran quite cool, with 9000 lbs on the tandems, verified on a CAT scale.

The "Load Range C" bias ply tires run 45 PSI max, "Load Range D" bias ply run 55 PSI max and the Goodyear Marathons, run 65 PSI max.
__________________
ARS WA8ZYT
2003 GMC 2500HD 4X4 D/A Ext. Cab
Propane Powered Honda EU2000i
Lots of Hot Sauce!
Air # 283
WBCCI 1350
Pick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2005, 05:12 PM   #14
3 Rivet Member
 
gotair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 199
Images: 9
Send a message via MSN to gotair Send a message via Yahoo to gotair
what does the rim say

when I purchased this trailer I got it home and pulled off the wheels to inspect the wheels and tires and brakes this is all important especially important with a single axel trailer ..... and an unkown trailer.... anyway the rim said 45 max and tire said 55 max .... just to mention I've never ran pressures as high as 65... they do rise that high after driving for a while and also in my neck of the woods I am almost at sea level and everywhere I go is higher... usualy around 4 thousand feet elevation.. thats another issue... pressures should not be juged on a cold tire either check it after about an hour and adjust ...you may have another problem... ballance is important and inner tread seperation is a possability which may not yet be vissable to the eye.... lay them on the ground and place your hand on the tread and slowly rotate your hand around the outside to inspect for small insignifigant (out-of-rounds) ... look them over very closely it may be something your not seeing while on the trailer... look for missing weights that may have spun off... you'll get to the problem sonner or later...I was having a problem with some new tires and didn't find the inner belt seperation for a long time... the tire was to new to see it.... Dan....
__________________

__________________
Life's short...take your kid camping
gotair is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LT versus ST tires on a trailer 76Argosy Tires 18 08-29-2014 05:03 PM
Help!! Hot Water Heater Flame is Too High emmy Water Heaters, Filters & Pumps 3 03-02-2006 03:29 PM
Whitewall Tires 66whitebread Tires 0 09-17-2002 07:29 PM
Looking for ideas hot water FrankR Water Heaters, Filters & Pumps 3 05-09-2002 11:28 AM
Best wheels & Tires... Andy R Wheels, Hubs & Bearings 4 04-15-2002 11:41 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.