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Old 06-30-2019, 05:49 AM   #1
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Goodyear Endurance Pressure

Just purchased new Goodyear Endurance Tires for my FC30. Replacing GYM that I ran at 65 psi. I’m asking for a recommendation regarding pressure for the new E rated ST225/75R15 GYE Tires. Max wt on the FC30 is 8800. I suspect I’m closer to 8000 or less most of the time. Thanks.
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:11 AM   #2
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Welcome Aboard....👍

We are at 7640lb with 75psi.
5k mi, SFSG👍
Others use minimum pressure load charts...TETO.

Bob
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Old 06-30-2019, 08:39 AM   #3
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Goodyear Endurance Pressure

I have the same trailer specs for my 30’ international (8,800 lbs weight rating based on two 4,400 lb GAWR dexter axles installed on the flying cloud/international 30’- the torsion axles are what drive this weight rating. I confirmed with airstream and engineering diagrams they sent me that the chassis and shell construction for the international/flying cloud 30 is the same as the 30’ classic, which is 10,000lb rating with two 5,000 GAWR dexter axles installed - just good to know where airstream are deriving the 8,800lb limit - which is base on the axles, the chassis itself is “overbuilt” for that weight rating - just FYI).

Wet ready for camping with a full tank of fresh water I’m at ~8,500 lbs including the tongue (as measured on cat scale). Once hitched I am at ~7,600 lbs on the axles /tires - this is the weight that matters - as this is the weight the tires and axles need to bear rolling down the road (vs parked and unhitched). So that’s an average of 1,900lbs load on each tire (average - the forward tires always carry a bit more load)

I run my Goodyear endurance at 65lbs. Based on the GYE load charts (attached) I could run at 45-50lbs, but prefer a little overhead / margin (I increase recommended by a factor of 130% ...50->65). I do so mainly because I often tow at 75mph often in wide open western highways with speed limits that are 75-80.

There are long and heavily debated threads on this topic if you search. You are safe at 80lbs (maximum sidewall pressure). The debate comes into play on how low you can go. Airstream always stamp the max tire pressure printed in the tire sidewall on the plaque (front driver side of the coach), Airstream do not follow the standards of the automotive industry where a manufacturers recommended pressure is based on GAWR of the vehicle and is almost always less than max sidewall pressure of the tire. As a prime example my gmc 2500 has a front axle tire pressure recommendation (yellow sticker inside drivers door) of 60lbs at 5,200lb FAWR for the front and the rears are 75lbs based on 6,200 RAWR - these GMC issued tire pressure numbers align exactly with the pressure recommended by the Goodyear Wrangler charts. Max sidewall for my GMC’s Goodyear Wranglers are 80. Again, just FYI. I’d be safe at 80 on this GMC truck but it’s simply not necessary if I am within my axle weight ratings.
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Old 06-30-2019, 09:33 AM   #4
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Since the tires are the same size as before why not run the same pressure? 65 psi?
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Old 06-30-2019, 10:00 AM   #5
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Running at the max pressure does not let the side walls flex much and transfers road bumps and jarring into the trailer often causing drawers, doors, and things to move around more in the trailer. Also contributes to rivet "popping" on the interior and exterior. I run the pressure reccomended in the chart or on the plate attached to the trailer. I inflated to max pressure a few times and saw the consequences of the road jarring the trailer with drawers out and rivets missing. I have TPMS that shows pressure and temperature, as well as a "temperature gun" to check temps when we stop. This is just my opinion, from experiences with 3 Airstreams. Others will have their own opinions and reasons for their inflation pressures. Good luck with whatever pressure you decide to run with!!
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Old 06-30-2019, 12:59 PM   #6
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Our rivet pooping experience...🥴

Safari with GYM's at 65psi.
Lost a lot of interior rivets.
Adjusted pressure higher & lower, replaced shocks, balanced wheels, no change. 🤔
Finally rode in Safari on a 2 lane country road, bang'n, bounce'n and vibrate'n like crazy. 👎
Was told I needed an axle. Replaced axle...still shaking at highway speed, re-balanced same vibration. 😖
Balanced the brake drums and the wheels, vibration gone, no more pooped rivets.👍
My conclusion...a constant harmonic vibration with more than one cause poops a lot of rivets, TP alone, not so much.🤓

Bob
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:05 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBWELL
Running at the max pressure does not let the side walls flex much and transfers road bumps and jarring into the trailer often causing drawers, doors, and things to move around more in the trailer. Also contributes to rivet "popping" on the interior and exterior.

Agreed.

Choose your favorite pressure somewhere between minimum published on the GYE chart for your GAWR (50) to max printed on the sidewall (80). I chose 65. Nobody can tell you the “best” pressure ... you’ll have to make that decision for yourself now that you have the facts regarding the upper and lower bounds.
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Old 07-01-2019, 07:15 AM   #8
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Thank You

Thanks for the advice. I’ll run 65.
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Old 07-01-2019, 10:37 AM   #9
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Airstream has no idea of what loads you carry in your trailer and will always publish max inflation limits as per the model tire that was installed at build time. Most owners never have weighed their trailer so to guess what exact pressures you need to carry that weight is a guess at best. Carrying a higher than necessary pressure (within the stated sidewall limits) than necessary will not cause a catastrophic failure of the tire like overloading or under inflation will.

The other thing you do have to keep in mind is that in a perfect world each tires of your trailer would be carrying an equal amount of weight. Dependent upon how you load your trailer and the placement of interior furnishing and appliances, one wheel for example may be carrying more weight than the others. I found this true when weighing my trailer and found the curb side rear axle tire was carrying additional weight. This is very much why you shouldn't match the exact weight of the trailer with the inflation charts. Tires do need a reserve factor. In essence the tire should be inflated to a pressure that will support more weight than the weight you may think the trailer weighs at any given moment.

Most tire industries professionals recommend keeping at least a 10-15% margin capacity margin when considering your tire inflation pressure. I upgraded my tires on my heavy 30' Classic slide out to 16" inch and run 80 psi. I find that not out of line with my trailer that with a full water tank and with my typical 500 lb camping load weighs in at 9,100 lbs. That means my fully inflated tires fall into that 10-15% reserve capacity range.

FYI, in 15 years of use of that trailer, I have not seen any evidence of the trailer losing rivets or showing any other signs of an excessive overinflation. The goal if you decide to use inflation charts is to truly know the weight of your trailer, loaded normally, and inflate giving yourself that additional 10-15% reserve capacity.

Jack
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:08 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by jcanavera View Post
Airstream has no idea of what loads you carry in your trailer and will always publish max inflation limits as per the model tire that was installed at build time. Most owners never have weighed their trailer so to guess what exact pressures you need to carry that weight is a guess at best. Carrying a higher than necessary pressure (within the stated sidewall limits) than necessary will not cause a catastrophic failure of the tire like overloading or under inflation will.

The other thing you do have to keep in mind is that in a perfect world each tires of your trailer would be carrying an equal amount of weight. Dependent upon how you load your trailer and the placement of interior furnishing and appliances, one wheel for example may be carrying more weight than the others. I found this true when weighing my trailer and found the curb side rear axle tire was carrying additional weight. This is very much why you shouldn't match the exact weight of the trailer with the inflation charts. Tires do need a reserve factor. In essence the tire should be inflated to a pressure that will support more weight than the weight you may think the trailer weighs at any given moment.

Most tire industries professionals recommend keeping at least a 10-15% margin capacity margin when considering your tire inflation pressure. I upgraded my tires on my heavy 30' Classic slide out to 16" inch and run 80 psi. I find that not out of line with my trailer that with a full water tank and with my typical 500 lb camping load weighs in at 9,100 lbs. That means my fully inflated tires fall into that 10-15% reserve capacity range.

FYI, in 15 years of use of that trailer, I have not seen any evidence of the trailer losing rivets or showing any other signs of an excessive overinflation. The goal if you decide to use inflation charts is to truly know the weight of your trailer, loaded normally, and inflate giving yourself that additional 10-15% reserve capacity.

Jack


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Operation “Goodyear Endurance” is a GO!
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Old 07-10-2019, 01:01 PM   #11
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Endurance flat

I had a Goodyear Endurance adventure last week. Traveling through Weiser, Idaho, my second summer on Endurance tires, I got a puncture that ruined the tire. Ironically, my tire pressure monitor battery died on the left rear tire that morning. I stuck a bolt of some kind that broke off and left a 1/4 inch hole in the center of the tread. I only knew about it when a SUV passed me in town waving at me. When I pulled over I saw the flat. I don't know how far I drove this way, but the tires were hot! I put the spare on and continued to Grangeville on July 3rd. What I found was it is hard to find a Goodyear Endurance trailer tire. I did eventually find one of 2 in stock at M&C tire in Kalispell. These guys were fantastic and replaced my tire. Pictures showed the sidewall melted inside and the tire was trash. They showed me that the valve stems were not correct for the load range E tires.
The Goodyear dealer in Oxnard, CA was pathetic; not knowing this and jacking the trailer on the axle along with stripping a lug nut. M&C put high pressure valve stems in all four tires and replaced 2 cracked lug nuts with chromed steel ones to replace the aluminum sleeved stock nuts. I will replace all of them in the future. When I took the Airstream out of storage in Sacramento, the guy filled the tires to 75-77 PSI. I have used 65 PSI in the past. But, the Endurance tires are rated to 87 MPH at 80 PSI. (I do drive through Nevada at 75 MPH on I-80). I wonder if the 75 PSI inflation helped the remaining tire take the load after the flats? An interesting conundrum in choosing what pressure to run?
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Old 07-10-2019, 03:05 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by rp709 View Post
the Endurance tires are rated to 87 MPH at 80 PSI. (I do drive through Nevada at 75 MPH on I-80).
I think you're mixing two parameters.
1. The GY Endurance tires are speed rated E up to 87 mph.
2. The sidewall says, "For Maximum Load, inflate to 80 pounds.
In other words, the pressure is related to the weight, not the speed.
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:00 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Mollysdad View Post
I think you're mixing two parameters.
1. The GY Endurance tires are speed rated E up to 87 mph.
2. The sidewall says, "For Maximum Load, inflate to 80 pounds.
In other words, the pressure is related to the weight, not the speed.
Ah …. Mmmmm …. not exactly.

Ya' see, max speed is tied to inflation pressure, but not in the way rp709 was saying.

Put another way, to increase the speed capability of a tire, use higher inflation pressure.
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Old 07-11-2019, 10:53 AM   #14
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Pressure, speed, stems

Thanks for the reminder to keep a spare battery for those pressure transmitters in the toolbox. Also, my Goodyear dealer replaced all the old stems with metal high pressure stems and balanced the new tires on my rims. As far as speed goes, I have not seen anything from Goodyear regarding speed and pressure. It appears that they rate the GYE at 87 mph as long as the pressure is sufficient for the load per the published inflation table. Has anyone seen anything otherwise from Goodyear?
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Old 07-12-2019, 06:29 AM   #15
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…… I have not seen anything from Goodyear regarding speed and pressure. It appears that they rate the GYE at 87 mph as long as the pressure is sufficient for the load per the published inflation table. Has anyone seen anything otherwise from Goodyear?
https://www.goodyeartrucktires.com/p...dinflation.pdf

The link goes to a part of a guide that discusses commercial tires (RV tires are part of that!). Starting on page 41, it talks about speed vs inflation/load. While it doesn't specifically address ST tires, it does outline the principle - which is applicable for all tires.

At one point in time, Goodyear's load table for ST tires specifically called out in a note, more inflation/less load for higher speed operation. They've redone how they did the webpages and the ST load tables no longer have that note, but I don't think the principle has changed (It's kind of Physics thing.)
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Old 07-13-2019, 04:42 AM   #16
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Speed Pressure Physics

Thank you for looking this info up for me. Interesting and it makes sense. Seems if you want to consistently run fast, over 65mph, then run the pressure on the high side. Now that I’m unleashed from the speed limits of the Marathons, I’ll feel better going close to 65 on occasion, but I doubt I will ever go much faster. The Silverado 1500 and FC30, even with max tow pkg on the truck, doesn’t exactly stop on a dime. I’m the guy towing the Airstream in the right lane on I-10 across the great expanse of Texas where the speed limit is 80 and the scenery is worth slowing down for. Maiden voyage for the new Tires will be in the direction of Traverse City Michigan where the roads are two lane and the speed limits will not require extra pressure. Thanks again.
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