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Old 12-30-2014, 06:45 AM   #29
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Relative to the Firestone issue mentioned above. I, also, do not work for the automaker which was subject to that issue. But as an industry "insider", I always felt there was something about that tire/vehicle combination which led to a more troublesome result when a blowout occurred. There was something unique about the geometry and physics of that vehicle which made it very unstable when a blowout occurred that was not present when the same tire failure occurred on other vehicles. I don't think the complete story was ever made public. I do find it interesting that that vehicle underwent significant design changes after the issue...maybe it was in the works already, but I am "professionally" suspicious.
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Old 12-30-2014, 07:16 AM   #30
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Inspection of tires at each stop is always a good practice and one that is seldom used. You can see a lot of problems looking and feeling of tires. I have found several leaks from nails etc just by looking at tires and how much sag they have. Also pressures will tell you a lot. If 3 are all the same and one is lower there is a good chance there is a nail in that low tire. Also, I have found nails in tires that were not low just by looking at tires. Maybe this is a talent of my ADD nature.

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Old 12-30-2014, 08:28 AM   #31
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ADD or not, it is very good practice. Peace, jim
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Old 12-30-2014, 08:49 AM   #32
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Hi, I didn't read every post as I tend to bypass the extremely long winded ones. I had two tires develop small sidewall bubbles on them, one each, at just over three years. The other two lasted seven years and were starting to separate. None of my tires were worn out or had any cracks in them. I visually check my tires at every rest stop, every gas stop, and every camp ground. Remember "New doesn't mean good" and a new tire can pop too. I'll say that seven years is the time limit for tires. Also, when tires are mounted correctly, most of them will have the DOT code on the inside.
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Old 12-30-2014, 04:26 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baldwin6601 View Post
We have a 2010 22' Sport. We will be starting our fifth camping season month after next with a trip to Tucson from Boise. We have about 23,000 miles on our tires. Our Airstream Dealer Service Manager advised us to get new tires before we head south in Feb. She does not sell tires so she had no ax to grind from that standpoint. I've always read that we should replace our tires every 7 years, regardless of miles on them. Do I really need new tires? Your thoughts, please and thanks.
I see since you posted this you havenít been active with any of the responses. You seem to be just setting back and taking in all the information. So, Iíve come back here to post my opinion on the subject at hand.

Your question becomes more difficult to answer because you have not described the design of the tires you are considering for replacement.

I also have a problem because once a tire is selected to serve on RV trailer axles it becomes a trailer tire.

Because there is no clear cut method to determine tire aging the manufacturer that built them is the best source for replacement recommendations. Generally manufacturers of tires will have some sort of information of how long a particular design will last under normal conditions for that specific design. Those manufacturing ST tires are pretty consistent about their 3-5 year normal use recommendations with replacement taking place at the five year mark.

I watched two major trailer manufacturers usage of LT tires on their brands during 2004 & 2005 production years. Once the failure reports started they were very consistent with the reports from ST tires on like sized axles. (Iím not including that steel cased tire. It does terrible damage). This information is provided to support my stance that a tire used on trailer axles needs to be considered as a trailer tire.

Yes, you should replace your tires.


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Old 12-30-2014, 05:28 PM   #34
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My 2013 31 classic has Goodyear marathons with 14240 miles , so far they are fine , they are made in china like the rest of the ST tires..When these go south ,there is a set of sendel 16" wheels in my shop and I will install Michelins or Bridgestone , My old as had used up quite a few sets of these china tires,the best went 17500 miles....most are junk!!!
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Old 12-31-2014, 09:29 AM   #35
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A good friend of mine here had an Over The Road tire recapping business. In our discussions about tires in general, the light came on for me when I was told there were 3 types of tires for OTR trucks. Steering, Drive and Trailer. Each tire type had a significant purpose when it was designed and constructed. I am in no way a tire expert, but here is the layman's (my) take on the matter.
Steering tires are subject to greater sidewall loading than are Drive or Trailer tires.
Drive axle tires undergo linear torque loading during acceleration and braking
Trailer tires are designed to carry the lions share of up to 80,000 lbs GVW and must be made to handle the extra heat that would be generated from the road and the load.
That being said, tires are not created equally. When you buy a "cheap" tire, that's what you get. I can get two or three foreign tires for the price of a good US made tire, but that is a false economy. Peace of mind is priceless. I have Coopers on mine, and may go back with them or the Goodyear. I prefer American products. There are many good ones to choose from.

There is no defendable reason that the person who puts high mileage at freeway speeds shouldn't use a premium tire. Premium tires go boom too, but not as often as their cheap cousins.
BTW, at every fuel stop or break, I put my hand on the hubs to check for excess heat, and at least look the tires over. It's a good habit to get into and only takes a few minutes.
Happy New Year!!!!
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Old 12-31-2014, 10:55 AM   #36
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I was always told as a general rule to replace between 5 and 7 years. I've split the difference and always replaced at 6 years. I'm on my third set of tires now. Our 2001 Safari is nearing 14 years of age. The mileage you put on your tires and where you store your trailer can also come into play. I don't put more than about 3,000 miles per year on ours, and we store ours indoors in an area with a pretty mild climate. Those conditions have been in our favor. You live in a colder winter climate and probably run up more miles than we do, so at 5 years it's probably a good idea to get new tires. When you do, make sure to repack your wheel bearings and get your brakes checked too. This is all pretty reasonably priced preventative maintenance that should help you avoid problems on the road ahead.
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Old 12-31-2014, 12:24 PM   #37
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On all my big trucks, I have owned 5, my current one is a 99 t 800 kenworth ,with pup trailer and 7 axles on the ground.. With 1,355,000 miles. The steer tires are the same as the trailer tires, my drive tires are like a mild all season..and I have even run run this tread on the pup ,with no problems and never a tire failure,and there are no Chinese tires on this unit!!!. Also I will not run a recapped tire...
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Old 12-31-2014, 02:25 PM   #38
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Yes you can tell when you're running in recap country........gators all over the place.
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Old 12-31-2014, 02:50 PM   #39
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We have a 2005 19' Bambi, and I installed Michelin XPS Ribs (225/75x16, LR-E, 80 psi, made in Germany) in January 2011.

To date, the XPS Ribs have around 20,000 miles on them, towing at 55-60 mph; and the tread still looks new. Plus, we have had absolutely NO tire problems after switching to these LT tires.

I anticipate that I will have to replace them at age 6-7 years due to sidewall weather-checking and cracks; and most likely, less than half of the tread will be worn away from the anticipated 75,000 (cumulative total) miles we plan to put on them before they are replaced. Then, I think I can sell them to a landscaper, who can still get a little more use out of them on a light-duty utility trailer.

For me, the $285 per tire cost will be well-worth 6-7 years of trouble-free towing, versus the constant worry of blowouts and tread separations with 15" ST tires.

Continuing to run ST tires may have ended up a cost trade-off. However, after the additional expense of roadside assistance (to replace blown-out ST tires) and Airstream wheelwell repairs were added, not to mention the vacation hours wasted while broken down on the side of the road and waiting for tire replacements to arrive in small backwater towns, our tire-buying decision was easy.
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