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Old 12-28-2014, 12:23 PM   #15
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Find a mounted tire older than 6-7 years. Look very closely. You will see small cracks in the rubber casing. check around the tread. They may not penetrate through completely, BUT, it is a sure sign that things are breaking down.
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Old 12-28-2014, 02:10 PM   #16
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Maybe one more year-
Are the sidewalls cracked?
On my 1st trailer I got new tires after 4 years because there was obvious uneven tread wear.
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Old 12-28-2014, 06:46 PM   #17
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Were these ST tires?

Perry

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Foster View Post
Between our two Airstreams we have towed abound 200,000 miles. We have had tire failures on both rigs. Every time the tire has been over two years old. One failure caused extensive damage to the side of the Caravel.

Now at about the two year point it's tire time.

New tires are the only insurance you can buy against the most common cause of unnecessary roadside delay and inconvenience.


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Old 12-28-2014, 07:24 PM   #18
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I have been researching tires and found lots of information on this site. Only 5 or 6 brands of tires to choose from in an ST special trailer tire. Whatever brand you decide on , I would go with a load range of E for the heaviest load rate available in a 15" tire. If you have put over 20K on this set of tires you have gotten your money's worth out of them. Bill
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Old 12-28-2014, 07:49 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perryg114 View Post
Were these ST tires?

Perry
Of course they were.
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:54 PM   #20
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As a newbie, I cannot seem to find how to edit a post. So I will add another, Actually there are at least 12 tires out there designed for Travel trailers. Maxxis, Kenda Carlisle Tow Master Goodyear Marathons, and Tow Max, Just to name a few. Having read several posts on this form, seems that everyone has had tire failures of one sort or another. While looking at another Travel Forum I found this place called Trailer Tires and Wheels - Steel & Aluminum Trailer Wheels, Bias & Radial Trailer Tires I have not done business with them but they seem to have a large selection and reasonable prices. I am waiting till the spring to buy to try and get the newest rubber available. To me ST special trailer tires are engineered for that purpose so I plan to go with them at load range E vs Lt Light truck Rated at just over #2800 lbs per tire at 80 psi. Best of luck with your tire search. Bill
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:50 PM   #21
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I use only tires made for trailers on our Airstreams. Make seems to be far less important than load range, axle alignment, balance, air pressure and age.

Only my own findings.


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Old 12-28-2014, 11:15 PM   #22
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I sold tires at Sears for 8 years. Some of the best tires made are Michelins because of bead technology, compounds, design, etc. and I seem to remember even Michelin recommending minimum of 4 years and a max of 6. Unless you drive a lot, stay away from 90K to 100K tires as they usually "age out" before they "wear out" My guess a 50K or 60K tire will do but since trailer tires are "ST" many have no mileage warranty. Sunshine on sitting trailers' tires ages the surface compounds. Cover them. Tires have compounds (juices) which keep a tire viable as you use them and just sitting actually ages tires. Remember the 4 keep tires safe rules ( 1) inflation - remembering every 10 degrees ambient temperature is a 3 pound change of pressure in your tires. Most of us hate the TPMS system which sets a code on your dash in the morning. As the tire is driven and/or the day gets warmer the code light goes out. Never air a cold tire to max pressure early in the morning. ( 2) overloading tires builds heat, the primary tire killer (3) ST tires are speed rated usually 65 MPH and while you will exceed that at interstate sustained 75 MPH cheap tires can overheat. (4) High ambient temperature on very hot days say 100 degrees and over is tough on tires. Cross deserts in the morning and slow down. On single axle trailers which call for 6 ply , buy 8 ply and make sure your spare matches (cover the spare if outside) I gutted my single axle 22' 1958 Caravanner down to 2180# (2280# loaded) but still keep most things in the back of my Escalade EXT and I run 8 ply at 2150# per tire so I'm close to my 4400# axle. Since your Sport is 3515# base and can load 985# more you could be 4500# which is your axle rating. A max'ed out axle, if you ever tow that heavy, means you want some "extra" cushion (LOL) from tires. I'd guess yours are 15" rims and 225 wide tires. Suggest 3 new 22575D15 (bias ply) rated @ 2540#@ 65psi or best 22575R15 Load range E @ 2830# @ 80 psi each and are radials. The latter somewhat forgiving and on bad roads a must. I'd error on the side of Load E for the single axle but as pressure decreases your subject to tail waggle. Balance all 3. Plan $500. Too bad no Michelins available. Go Maxxis 80008, polyester cord ( Kevlar would be better) with nylon cap, 2 steel belts, made in Taiwan ( better than mainland China) Load E 225/75/R15 ST and run @ 65psi with a Reese Straightline ( dampens tail wobble). Make sure OEM rims will handle 80 psi and use high pressure valve stems ( they bolt in - not just pulled thru the hole type). You could run interstates @ 75 MPH+ ( I never said it) but some state " smokie the bears" will check your tires and discuss the ST speed max of 65 MPH industry standard. There are Tire Rack and Goodyear service bulletins you might copy and show the officer for 66 MPH to 75 MPH but they are written above the 8th grade reading level so allow an extra 20 minutes per encounter. I always like to darken an area of the tread, raise the rig and lower it on a piece of white paper. Crown in the center is premature wear and dish in the center likewise for wear but the latter can cause over heating as it may actually be underinflation. Do this "on ball" and set for road travel and loaded per normal. You now not only know the time- you know how the clock was built. lrahnmajusafret@gmail.com NOT EXACTLY A QUICK REPLY
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Old 12-29-2014, 05:54 AM   #23
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Just some info on tire failures.

First is that many things can puncture a tire and many of those will be undetectable AFTER the tire fails - and while the vast majority of punctures can be detected before the loss of pressure has caused damage, some will not be detected. The result may be misinterpreted as a "defect caused" failure. Just be aware that many tire failures are the result of punctures and not the result of things the tire manufacturer has control of.

ANY tire can get punctured - and there's no predicting when that will happen. It is entirely random - and it is quite possible to have a series of puncture related failures in short succession.

Unlike a car, where the driver can hear and feel a tire going down, a tire going down on a trailer is largely undetectable. It can take as little as a hundred feet for a tire to deflate and become damaged beyond repair. Driving further can cause damage to the vehicle as the tire breaks apart.

To help reduce the odds of this happening to you I recommend the following.

1) Check the inflation pressure before every major tow - both the trailer and the tow vehicle. - and at least once a day when towing.

2) Before every tow, check the tire for bulges by rubbing your hads around the circumference of the tread (Wear gloves!). If you detect a bulge, STOP and change the tire. It takes only a few hundred miles for a tire bulge to go from detectable to catastrophic failure.

3) Do your homework. If you haven't weighed your trailer - do so. Check the weight against the load carrying capacity of the tires - and be sure to account for side to side and front to rear load variation. Also account for fully loaded conditions if you don't weigh the trailer that way.

Also, do a pressure build up test on your tires. Measure them first thing in the morning and an hour after towing. The difference should be less than 10%. If it is more you need to do something to fix it - slow down, change load ranges, tire size, or reduce the load. If the difference is over 15%, you need to action IMMEDIATELY!
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Old 12-29-2014, 07:19 AM   #24
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I am for putting car and light truck tires on Airstreams only. For high center of gravity trailers, ST tires might be better. Manufactures' don't really care if a trailer tires fail because they are not supposed to be passengers on trailers so their liability is much less. As a result, many of these ST tires are substandard and have little or no quality control. They are also made lighter weight and have higher operating pressures. The 65 MPH max speed rating reflects this. If you have a heavy fat newer trailer put the 16 inch rims on it and use the E rated LT tires, otherwise use the 235/75-XL15 tires which are good to about 2000lb each. I plan on putting ST tires on my junk trailer which I don't care about and won't cost me $1000's to fix if a tire blows out. I expect 6 yrs is about right on tire lifetimes. The only good thing about ST tires is most of them have UV stabilizers in the rubber that make them look new after 10 plus years of sitting outside.

Perry
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Old 12-29-2014, 08:21 AM   #25
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In the world or RV trailer manufacturing itís each individual RV trailer manufacturerís decision and responsibility to select and fit tires to each unit they build. The major tire manufacturers will not often, if ever, dispute the vehicle manufacturerís tire selections and fitments..

The RV trailer manufacturer can always earmark other tire fitments to replace the original equipment tires. It is done with notations in each individual trailerís ownerís manual.

Individual trailer owners opting to use replacement tires of another design differing in construction from the OE tires should always seek recommendations from the trailerís manufacturer. Recommendations to do so from a tire retailer is not valid and would be disputed should a warranty adjustment be sought.

Should a RV trailer manufacturer fit models 1XXX with ST tires and model 2XXX with LT tires would not be justification to use both (ST-LT) on either model.

Good food for comments.

There are a couple of posters in this forum with extensive tire industry experience. However they are often reluctant to post valid industry standards. Maybe itís because they would be quoting from confidential publications that I do not have access to.

I do know this. The major tire manufacturers in this country are taking a long hard look at tire misapplications and itís starting to show-up in their tire warranty documents.


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Old 12-29-2014, 10:46 AM   #26
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Good Morning, Baldwin
I'm in the same boat with my 2010 20ft FC....both of our rigs have a single axle, and we both put on a lot of miles. Following the 5 year rule espoused on this and other AS forums I'll spend the money this spring and upgrade to a new set of 16" wheels and LT Michelin tires (although the Goodyear Marathons still looks excellent). Stay safe. jon
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Old 12-29-2014, 03:26 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigButtUgly View Post
I sold tires at Sears for 8 years. Some of the best tires made are Michelins because of bead technology, compounds, design, etc. and I seem to remember even Michelin recommending minimum of 4 years and a max of 6. Unless you drive a lot, stay away from 90K to 100K tires as they usually "age out" before they "wear out" My guess a 50K or 60K tire will do but since trailer tires are "ST" many have no mileage warranty. Sunshine on sitting trailers' tires ages the surface compounds. Cover them. Tires have compounds (juices) which keep a tire viable as you use them and just sitting actually ages tires. Remember the 4 keep tires safe rules ( 1) inflation - remembering every 10 degrees ambient temperature is a 3 pound change of pressure in your tires. Most of us hate the TPMS system which sets a code on your dash in the morning. As the tire is driven and/or the day gets warmer the code light goes out. Never air a cold tire to max pressure early in the morning. ( 2) overloading tires builds heat, the primary tire killer (3) ST tires are speed rated usually 65 MPH and while you will exceed that at interstate sustained 75 MPH cheap tires can overheat. (4) High ambient temperature on very hot days say 100 degrees and over is tough on tires. Cross deserts in the morning and slow down. On single axle trailers which call for 6 ply , buy 8 ply and make sure your spare matches (cover the spare if outside) I gutted my single axle 22' 1958 Caravanner down to 2180# (2280# loaded) but still keep most things in the back of my Escalade EXT and I run 8 ply at 2150# per tire so I'm close to my 4400# axle. Since your Sport is 3515# base and can load 985# more you could be 4500# which is your axle rating. A max'ed out axle, if you ever tow that heavy, means you want some "extra" cushion (LOL) from tires. I'd guess yours are 15" rims and 225 wide tires. Suggest 3 new 22575D15 (bias ply) rated @ 2540#@ 65psi or best 22575R15 Load range E @ 2830# @ 80 psi each and are radials. The latter somewhat forgiving and on bad roads a must. I'd error on the side of Load E for the single axle but as pressure decreases your subject to tail waggle. Balance all 3. Plan $500. Too bad no Michelins available. Go Maxxis 80008, polyester cord ( Kevlar would be better) with nylon cap, 2 steel belts, made in Taiwan ( better than mainland China) Load E 225/75/R15 ST and run @ 65psi with a Reese Straightline ( dampens tail wobble). Make sure OEM rims will handle 80 psi and use high pressure valve stems ( they bolt in - not just pulled thru the hole type). You could run interstates @ 75 MPH+ ( I never said it) but some state " smokie the bears" will check your tires and discuss the ST speed max of 65 MPH industry standard. There are Tire Rack and Goodyear service bulletins you might copy and show the officer for 66 MPH to 75 MPH but they are written above the 8th grade reading level so allow an extra 20 minutes per encounter. I always like to darken an area of the tread, raise the rig and lower it on a piece of white paper. Crown in the center is premature wear and dish in the center likewise for wear but the latter can cause over heating as it may actually be underinflation. Do this "on ball" and set for road travel and loaded per normal. You now not only know the time- you know how the clock was built. lrahnmajusafret@gmail.com NOT EXACTLY A QUICK REPLY

nice reply BUT every so often you need to put a SPACE.. it hard a h@ll to read a 50 sentence paragraph with NO space.
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Old 12-30-2014, 06:36 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackAces View Post
......There are a couple of posters in this forum with extensive tire industry experience. However they are often reluctant to post valid industry standards. Maybe itís because they would be quoting from confidential publications that I do not have access to........
With all due respect, I do not think this is true. Both Tireman9 and I have been pretty open about the industry standards - and if I remember my legal work correctly, the term "industry standards" has a specific meaning that applies to real world situations, so they can not be secret in any form.

As an example of an industry standard, I submit the recommendation that when replacing only 2 tires on a 4 wheeled vehicle, the new tires should go on the rear.

Another would be replacing tires simply because of age - although the exact time limit seems not to be consistent. I have heard anywhere from 6 to 10 years - and my interpretation of that is (and I want to emphasize that this is my interpretation) is that in hot climates the limit is 6 years and in cold climate the limit is 10 years.

But, BlackAces, perhaps you meant something like proprietary information or trade secrets - and those, of course, vary from company to company and since Roger and I worked for different companies, we would certainly know things that would be considered proprietary or trade secrets - BUT - not only do I think that those would be of little value to any of the discussions being held here, I also think most are peculiar to the company we worked for and might not have validity for other companies.

If you have a question that you'd like the answer to, please ask away. If the information you seek is proprietary, I'm sure both Roger and I will tell you so, but I am also sure we both will try to give you some insight into why the information is proprietary AND then pass on whatever information we can so you get the jist of things.

Example? How about the failure rates of ST tires vs LT tires? Neither Tireman9, nor myself worked for companies that produced both. Niether of us would know what both are. I don't know about Roger, but I was privy to that information for LT tires (for the company I worked for). I was also privy to the changes made to LT tires (and P tires, too!) over the years, and what effect they had.

Want a feel for what the failure rate was? Dr. Sanjay Govindjee, of the University of California - Berkley, was asked by Firestone to analyze the data surrounding the Firestone ATX and Wilderness AT. The report is dated Jan 30, 2001.

Here's a quote: " Overall, it is noted that the problem at hand is rather complex, the failure rates are fractions of a percent, and thus determining a single cause for the tire failures is an unrealistic expectation."

Note that he said "failure rates are fractions of a percent". I interpret that to mean a half or a quarter, or some value in that vicinity - and not anything near a percent, or anything in the tenths of a percent, as he would have used different words. This lines up very closely to the values of the worst performing tires for the company I worked for. I have confidence I have correctly identified the actual failure rate for these tires.

But these are P type tires, and those failure rates were lower than LT type tires. Also, 14 years has elapsed since the report was written and the tires this report is about were produced before that. In other words, the failure rates of tires produced today are significantly lower than the tires being analyzed in that report.

What to takeaway from that bit of information? That it is quite possible for someone to not experience a problem with a particular type of tire, even though he has used multiple sets.
(Remember we are talking about current failure rates much less than a fraction of a percent.)

It is also possible for someone to experience repeated problems since the number of tires in the marketplace is so huge. I wouldn't want to be that guy, but I have to recognize that even with low failures rates, the possibility exists.

Does this help?

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