Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-16-2009, 11:38 AM   #1
3 Rivet Member
 
1963 24' Tradewind
Cape Coral , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 200
D versus E

My 1963 Tradewind single axle had an original dry weight of 3,200 to 3,300 pounds. With propane and batteries and beer the wet weight will probably be at least 1,000 pounds more than that. Its probably easier on the rivets to go with an 8 ply tire, but it seems right at the upper end of the D rating. Would I be better off to use a 10 ply at 60 pounds of pressure?
__________________

__________________
dieseleagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2009, 11:49 AM   #2
tpi
Rivet Master
 
2005 25' Safari
Trabuco Canyon , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 866
Images: 2
I'd be interested in this discussion also. I bought 8 ply tires because on my 25 they seemed rather lightly loaded. But I also considered 10 ply tires run at a lower pressure. Are 10 ply tires stronger and more durable than 8 ply tires when run at pressures typically used by 8 ply tires?
__________________

__________________
tpi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2009, 11:54 AM   #3
Silver Mist
 
LI Pets's Avatar
 
1977 31' Sovereign
Riverhead , New York
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,008
Images: 28
every manufacturer has a load chart look one up for that brand
__________________
Bob
'77 Sovereign Intl 31' CB
WBCCI R2 Rep VAC 11411 Metro NY VP

LI Pets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2009, 03:02 PM   #4
3 Rivet Member
 
2005 16' International CCD
Ogden , Utah
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 221
I went through a very similar question this summer, when I was upgrading the tires & wheels on my 2005 16' CCD from 215/75R14 (load range c) to 225/75R15 (load range d). I could have gone with a load range e also - so I asked basically the same question being asked in this thread. I'll post an email response I got that helped me understand - from a distinguished contributor in these forums.

To summarize - this was a typical 'Goldilocks & the 3 Bears' situation for me - where LRC was too little, LRE was too much, and LRD was 'just right'....

Your situation may be a little different - seems like your 24' & my 16' are both about 3300 pounds dry, but my little trailer isn't supposed to go over 3500 and yours may be as much as ~4500 pounds. But the info about plies may still be useful to you.

Quote
"the d rated tires are your best option.

but to clear this issue up for you...

c, d and e rated maxxis all have the SAME number of plies.

go read the specs more closely and then note the "ply" used on these tires is a rating or 'equivalency' term used to make radial tires comparable to older style tires (bias ply) that did have 6, 8 or 10 layers...

maxxis and goodyear both refer to 'ply rating' which is not the same thing as actual layers of tire...

the maxxis does have a nylon cap and the gym has an extra nylon belt that serves the same purpose.

but in terms of 'belts' or layers the tires all are the same from c though e ratings, in each brand.

now, for your question, would more layers be better?

well not necessarily.

more layers would be mean more retained heat and heat is a primary reason for belt/tread separation in tires.

so thicker tires UNDER inflated is not a good thing, especially if driving faster or in the summer.

the tire sidewalls would FLEX more, heat up more and so on...

so again in your case the best choice is d rated tires, properly inflated."
__________________
Bob
Ogden, Utah
2005 16' CCD
2005 Dodge Ram 2500 Quad Cab 4WD
RDM16CCD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2009, 05:03 PM   #5
3 Rivet Member
 
1963 24' Tradewind
Cape Coral , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 200
I don't think I quite asked the right question. The sidewall of an E rated tire is stiffer than that of a D rated tire. Even if the nuimber of plies is the same, the construction of the tire is different.
There is a relationship between weight and inflation pressure depending on the rating of the tire, whether expressed as plies or the letter rating. For the weight of the Tradewind, a D rated tire needs to be inflated pretty close its maximum pressure of 65 lbs. An E rated tire would also need to be at 65 lbs for the same weight, but that's 80 pecent of its maximum, which will allow some flex. Which is easier on the trailer?
__________________
dieseleagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2009, 12:18 AM   #6
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,110
Images: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieseleagle View Post
I For the weight of the Tradewind, a D rated tire needs to be inflated pretty close its maximum pressure of 65 lbs. An E rated tire would also need to be at 65 lbs for the same weight, but that's 80 pecent of its maximum, which will allow some flex. Which is easier on the trailer?

The "D" in my opinion. It will run cooler. Flex isn't a quality you want in a moving tire. It will build heat if there is more flex and heat kills tires. The "E" fully inflated will be a stiffer ride.

With that said I bet the difference is small between the two load ranges.

So ya gotta ask yourself, why am I paying more $ for a tire that doesn't give something more in return? And actually may be more harmful?

>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2009, 08:52 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
HowieE's Avatar
 
1991 34' Excella
Princeton , New Jersey
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,853
Images: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieseleagle;
For the weight of the Tradewind, a D rated tire needs to be inflated pretty close its maximum pressure of 65 lbs. An E rated tire would also need to be at 65 lbs for the same weight, but that's 80 pecent of its maximum, which will allow some flex. Which is easier on the trailer?
I applaud your recognition of the fact that tires are not intended to be inflated to the MAX under all conditions, most owners and tire dealers do not. The total flex of the tires sidewall will be the same for 2 tires carrying different loads but each inflated to the Correct pressure. The tire companies have considered this and set the inflation charts accordingly.

I run E rated tires on my tri axle inflated to 45 lbs. while the tire is rated to 80 lbs. As for temperature they run about 105 on the shaded side and 110 on the sunny side in summer.
__________________
WBCCI 12156 AIR 3144 WACHUNG TAC NJ6
2004 Excursion 4x4
1991 34 ft. Excella +220,000 miles, new laminated flooring, new upholstery, new 3200 lbs axles

HowieE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2009, 11:04 AM   #8
3 Rivet Member
 
1963 24' Tradewind
Cape Coral , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 200
I read several threads last night in an effort to finalize decisions regarding brand and load rating choices. Learned a lot, as usual, but - - Holy Smoke! I thought people were passionate when discussing Dodge vs Ford. Not like talking tires. I'm reminded of the alleged quote from Henry Ford. He said tires should be round and black, and he really didn't care all that much about them being black.

Seriously though. We have a big investment in our rigs. They sit on those few square inches of rubber. Its probably the last place to try to save a few dollars.
__________________
dieseleagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2009, 12:19 PM   #9
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,110
Images: 13
I believe the quote was "I don't care as long as they are round black and cheap. And the first two don't count." Stated back in the '70s when there was a tire strike and a shortage of tires.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2009, 12:34 PM   #10
3 Rivet Member
 
1963 24' Tradewind
Cape Coral , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 200
Your version makes more sense than mine.
__________________
dieseleagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2009, 10:16 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
1984 31' Excella
Norfolk , Virginia
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 667
Images: 11
D versus E

As I have stated before, the rubber compounds used to construct ST tires (65 mph Speed Rating) looses its integrity at a lower temperature than LT tires (Speed Rating 99 mph or so).
If you go to E rated tires you should run the same pressure as with the D rated tire or you will be beating the crap out of your trailer and there is always the good chance of having a wheel fail.
I run 60 psi in my load range D LT tires and in 3 years only had to add pressure once.
We don't need tires with more load range/higher inflation pressure, we just need better quality tires (Speed Rating of at least 99 mph)
Beginner
__________________
Beginner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2009, 10:26 PM   #12
RLS
Rivet Master
 
RLS's Avatar

 
2004 25' Classic
Prescott , Arizona
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 609
Quote:
We don't need tires with more load range/higher inflation pressure, we just need better quality tires (Speed Rating of at least 99 mph)
Beginner
I'll second that

Bob
__________________
RLS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2009, 12:51 AM   #13
Rivet Master
 
ROBERTSUNRUS's Avatar

 
2005 25' Safari
Salem , Oregon
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 7,312
Images: 18
Blog Entries: 51
Hi, I agree that maybe they could make better trailer tires, but I don't think it's OK to advertise [for some people] that you can now tow 99 MPH. I think 65 MPH is fast enough while towing a trailer. If for no other reason, 65 MPH rated trailer tires, will keep some people at a safe speed.
__________________
Bob

2005 Safari 25-B
"Le Petit Chateau Argent"
[ Small Silver Castle ]
2000 Navigator / 2014 F-150 Eco-Boost / Equal-i-zer / P-3
YAMAHA 2400 / AIR #12144
ROBERTSUNRUS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2009, 05:07 AM   #14
3 Rivet Member
 
1963 24' Tradewind
Cape Coral , Florida
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 200
Looking at the load/inflation tables for ST tires I've noted a curious thing. While the load for E rated tires at maximum pressure (80 lbs) is about the same as for LT tires (2830), the load for D rated tires at maximum pressure (2540) is markedly higher than a D rated LT tire. I've settled on "D's" since I'm concerned about the stress that E's would put on the trailer at higher pressures.
__________________

__________________
dieseleagle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LT versus ST tires on a trailer 76Argosy Tires 18 08-29-2014 05:03 PM
Fiver versus Airstream boscowtx Member Introductions 4 03-07-2007 08:33 AM
06 versus 07 Diesel TVs Streamer1 Tow Vehicles 24 11-22-2006 07:38 AM
God versus Computor... canny_banjo_man Off Topic Forum 2 03-04-2006 12:57 PM
Airstream versus SOB Princer Our Community 9 11-13-2004 09:24 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.