View Poll Results: Note: This poll must be completed in one session.
Has a tire failed on your Airstream in the past 5 years – Yes. 144 50.17%
Has a tire failed on your Airstream in the past 5 years – No. 145 50.52%
Reason for tire failure: Valve stem leak/failure. 6 2.09%
Reason for tire failure: Bubble in sidewall. 17 5.92%
Reason for tire failure: Bubble in tread area. 9 3.14%
Reason for tire failure: Belt/tread slipped, but still relatively intact. 16 5.57%
Reason for tire failure: Tread separated, but still partially attached to tire body. 28 9.76%
Reason for tire failure: Tread completely separated, but tire body still inflated. 12 4.18%
Reason for tire failure: Blowout, sidewall. 16 5.57%
Reason for tire failure: Blowout, with tread separation. 57 19.86%
Reason for tire failure: Other reason(s), not stated above. 18 6.27%
Ambient/outdoor temperature when tire failure occurred or was noticed: Subfreezing to freezing temperatures. Note: Please, select only one “ambient/outdoor temperature”. 1 0.35%
Ambient/outdoor temperature: Freezing to 70-degrees Fahrenheit. 24 8.36%
Ambient/outdoor temperature: 70 to 90-degrees Fahrenheit. 80 27.87%
Ambient/outdoor temperature: 90 to 110-degrees Fahrenheit. 37 12.89%
Ambient/outdoor temperature: 110+ degrees Fahrenheit. 1 0.35%
The tire failed: Before driving. Note: Please, select only one “tire failure time”. 10 3.48%
The tire failed: While driving. 111 38.68%
The tire failed: After driving. 18 6.27%
Number of axles on your Airstream: 1. Note: Please, select only one “number of axles” response. 45 15.68%
Number of axles on your Airstream: 2. 157 54.70%
Number of axles on your Airstream: 3. 11 3.83%
Position of tire that failed: Axle #1 (front or single axle), left side. Note: Please, select all “failed tire positions” that apply. 48 16.72%
Position of tire that failed: Axle #1 (front or single axle), right side. 64 22.30%
Position of tire that failed: Axle #2, left side. 31 10.80%
Position of tire that failed: Axle #2, right side. 39 13.59%
Position of tire that failed: Axle #3, left side. 4 1.39%
Position of tire that failed: Axle #3, right side. 5 1.74%
Did a road hazard, hitch failure or vehicle accident cause or contribute to the tire failure: Yes. 10 3.48%
Did a road hazard, hitch failure or vehicle accident cause or contribute to the tire failure: No. 113 39.37%
Did the tire failure cause or contribute to a vehicle accident: Yes. 0 0%
Did the tire failure cause or contribute to a vehicle accident: No. 131 45.64%
Number of tires that failed during the original incident: 1. Note: Please, select only one “number of tires that failed during original incident” response. 119 41.46%
Number of tires that failed during the original incident: 2. 15 5.23%
Number of tires that failed during the original incident: 3. 5 1.74%
Number of tires that failed during the original incident: 4 or more. 3 1.05%
Number of additional tires that failed within 30 days or 1,000 miles of the original incident: 1. Note: Please, select only one “number of additional tires, within 30 days or 1,000 miles” response. 20 6.97%
Number of additional tires that failed within 30 days or 1,000 miles: 2. 4 1.39%
Number of additional tires that failed within 30 days or 1,000 miles: 3. 1 0.35%
Number of additional tires that failed within 30 days or 1,000 miles: 4 or more. 0 0%
Number of additional tires that failed within 12 months or 12,000 miles of the original incident: 1. Note: Please, select only one “number of additional tires, within 12 months or 12,000 miles” response. 11 3.83%
Number of additional tires that failed within 12 months or 12,000 miles: 2. 3 1.05%
Number of additional tires that failed within 12 months or 12,000 miles: 3. 4 1.39%
Number of additional tires that failed within 12 months or 12,000 miles: 4 or more. 2 0.70%
Type of tire that failed: ST. Note: Please, select only one “type of tire that failed” response. 112 39.02%
Type of tire that failed: LT. 4 1.39%
Type of tire that failed: Other/unknown. 8 2.79%
Tire size of failed tire: 215/75. Note: Please, select only one “tire size”. 13 4.53%
Tire size: 225/75. 109 37.98%
Tire size: 235/75. 16 5.57%
Tire size: Other. 4 1.39%
Wheel size of failed tire: 14 inch. Note: Please, select only one “wheel size”. 16 5.57%
Wheel size: 15 inch. 136 47.39%
Wheel size: 16 inch. 8 2.79%
Wheel size: Other. 0 0%
Load range of tire that failed: C. Note: Please, select only one “load range”. 15 5.23%
Load range: D. 90 31.36%
Load range: E. 32 11.15%
Load range: Other. 3 1.05%
Normal tire pressure for tire that failed: 36 psi or less. Note: Please, select only one “normal tire pressure” response. 0 0%
Normal tire pressure: 36-44 psi. 4 1.39%
Normal tire pressure: 50 psi. 26 9.06%
Normal tire pressure: 55-60 psi. 25 8.71%
Normal tire pressure: 65 psi. 87 30.31%
Normal tire pressure: 72 psi. 5 1.74%
Normal tire pressure: 80 psi. 15 5.23%
Normal tire pressure: 80+ psi. 0 0%
Tire was inflated to “normal tire pressure” above, at time of failure. 111 38.68%
Tire was inflated to a lower pressure. 6 2.09%
Tire was inflated to a higher pressure. 1 0.35%
Tire pressure was unknown at time of failure. 5 1.74%
Manufacturer of failed tire: BG Goodrich. Note: Please, select only one “manufacturer of failed tire” response. 6 2.09%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Carlisle. 21 7.32%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Goodyear Marathon. 100 34.84%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Goodyear (other than Marathon). 0 0%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Greenball. 2 0.70%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Maxxis. 4 1.39%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Michelin. 2 0.70%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Towmax. 8 2.79%
Manufacturer of failed tire: Other. 13 4.53%
Manufacturing country of failed tire: Canada. Note: Please, select only one “manufacturing country” response. 11 3.83%
Manufacturing country: China. 50 17.42%
Manufacturing country: Europe. 0 0%
Manufacturing country: Mexico. 1 0.35%
Manufacturing country: Other Far Eastern Countries (e.g., Japan, Taiwan, Korea, Malaysia, etc.). 3 1.05%
Manufacturing country: USA. 14 4.88%
Manufacturing country: Other/unknown. 51 17.77%
Tire age at failure: Less than 1 year. Note: Please, select only one “tire age” response. 9 3.14%
Tire age: 1-2 years. 29 10.10%
Tire age: 2-3 years. 39 13.59%
Tire age: 3-4 years. 42 14.63%
Tire age: 4-5 years. 13 4.53%
Tire age: 5-6 years. 8 2.79%
Tire age: 6-7 years. 10 3.48%
Tire age: More than 7 years. 7 2.44%
Tire age: Unknown. 1 0.35%
Tire mileage at failure: Less than 1,000 miles. Note: Please, select only one “tire mileage” response. 2 0.70%
Tire mileage: 1,000-5,000 miles. 38 13.24%
Tire mileage: 5,000-10,000 miles. 56 19.51%
Tire mileage: 10,000-15,000 miles. 22 7.67%
Tire mileage: 15,000-20,000 miles. 2 0.70%
Tire mileage: More than 20,000 miles. 13 4.53%
Tire mileage: Unknown. 20 6.97%
Was the failed tire balanced by the tire installer: Yes. 102 35.54%
Was the failed tire balanced by the tire installer: No (or unknown). 29 10.10%
Did the tire that failed use a dynamic balancing device (Centramatic or similar): Yes. 25 8.71%
Did the tire that failed use a dynamic balancing device: No. 80 27.87%
Parking surface for failed tire during extended storage (longer than 30 days): Concrete. Note: Please, select only one “parking surface” response. 42 14.63%
Parking surface: Asphalt. 24 8.36%
Parking surface: Gravel or dirt. 57 19.86%
Parking surface: Wood. 8 2.79%
Parking surface: Synthetic material (rubber, plastic, etc.). 1 0.35%
Parking surface: Other. 9 3.14%
Cost of roadside assistance, towing, etc. due to tire failure: $0 Note: Please, include costs reimbursed by insurance. However, do not include tires, wheels, etc. Also, please select only one “cost of roadside assistance...” response. 79 27.53%
Cost of roadside assistance, towing, etc.: Up to $100. 19 6.62%
Cost of roadside assistance, towing, etc.: $100 - $500. 16 5.57%
Cost of roadside assistance, towing, etc.: $500 - $1,000. 1 0.35%
Cost of roadside assistance, towing, etc.: $1,000 - $5000. 2 0.70%
Cost of roadside assistance, towing, etc.: More than $5,000. 0 0%
Cost of replacement tire, wheel, shipping, ext warranty, mount/balance, etc. due to tire failure: $0 Note: Please include cost reimbursed by insurance. Also, please select only one “cost of replacement tire, wheel, etc.” response. 13 4.53%
Cost of replacement tire, wheel, shipping, etc.: Up to $250. 86 29.97%
Cost of replacement tire, wheel, shipping, etc.: $250 - $500. 16 5.57%
Cost of replacement tire, wheel, shipping, etc.: $500 - $1,000. 8 2.79%
Cost of replacement tire, wheel, shipping, etc.: $1,000 - $2,000. 3 1.05%
Cost of replacement tire, wheel, shipping, etc.: $2,000-$3,000. 1 0.35%
Cost of replacement tire, wheel, shipping, etc.: More than $3,000. 1 0.35%
Additional damage to your Airstream, if any: None. 81 28.22%
Additional damage to your Airstream: Minor cosmetic damage, not repaired. 20 6.97%
Additional damage to your Airstream: Functional damage to other tires, wheels, suspension parts, etc., repaired/replaced. 8 2.79%
Additional damage to your Airstream: Functional damage affecting safety, including brake lines/parts, electrical wiring, propane lines, etc., repaired/replaced. 5 1.74%
Additional damage to your Airstream: Major damage to exterior or interior of Airstream, including body panels, rock guards, hot water heater, refrigerator, etc. 19 6.62%
Additional damage: Damage to tow or other vehicles. 0 0%
Additional damage: Personal injury, property or other damage not usually associated with tire failure. 0 0%
Cost of additional damage to Airstream: $0 (no damage). Note: Please, select only one “cost of additional damage to Airstream” response. 61 21.25%
Cost of additional damage to Airstream: Up to $100 (estimate, if not repaired). 8 2.79%
Cost of additional damage to Airstream: $100 - $500 (estimate, if not repaired). 9 3.14%
Cost of additional damage to Airstream: $500 - $1,000 (estimate, if not repaired). 7 2.44%
Cost of additional damage to Airstream: $1,000 - $5000 (estimate, if not repaired). 13 4.53%
Cost of additional damage to Airstream: $5000 - $10,000 (estimate, if not repaired). 2 0.70%
Cost of additional damage to Airstream: More than $10,000 (estimate, if not repaired). 1 0.35%
Cost of personal injury, property, tow vehicle or other damage associated with tire failure: $0 (no other damage). Note: Please, select only one “cost of other damage” response. 68 23.69%
Cost of other damage: Up to $100. 2 0.70%
Cost of other damage: $100 - $500. 0 0%
Cost of other damage: $500 - $1,000. 0 0%
Cost of other damage: $1,000 - $5000. 0 0%
Cost of other damage: $5000 - $10,000. 0 0%
Cost of other damage: More than $10,000. 0 0%
Did your tow vehicle also experience TIRE damage in conjunction with the tire failure on your Airstream: Yes. 1 0.35%
Did your tow vehicle also experience TIRE damage in conjunction with the tire failure on your Airstream: No. 130 45.30%
My Airstream is towed on: Interstate and multilane highways. 178 62.02%
My Airstream is towed on: State and other improved two-lane highways, with shoulders. 161 56.10%
My Airstream is towed on: Mostly paved and well-maintained lesser-used "backroads". 88 30.66%
My Airstream is towed on: Poorly/minimally maintained backroads and offroad. 27 9.41%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 287. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-10-2016, 11:13 AM   #141
Rivet Master
 
Ravenna , Ohio
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
Tireman9,

While originally ignoring your post, I have decided that your critical comments deserve responses. See my comments below, in BLUE TEXT:
  • "Setting aside the question of the accuracy of the tire condition reporting one very critical item is missing and that is the full DOT serial number for every tire along with the date of failure or removal from service. Date of removal would provide insight to tire age at removal. The DOT also includes information on exactly which tire plant made the tire. Many times a given size or line of tires may be made at more than one plant If you get many 'failures' from one plant and very few from another plant that provides critical information for investigators."

    Obviously, the data you seek would be used for tire failure analysis to determine root cause for feedback to a tire manufacturer. A tire company could then use this information to correct the design and/or manufacturing process at specific plants to reduce tire failure rates and improve reliability. I’m sure you would also like photos of the failed tires, and even the tire carcasses, if available.

    Unfortunately, this was not the goal of the Airstream Tire Failure Poll, which was written over five years ago. The purpose of this poll was to determine the scope of tire failures on Airstreams, which were constantly being reported on AirForums.com. Also, while DOT serial numbers, photos and failed tire samples are useful to you, these items are not commonly saved by Airstream owners after suffering catastrophic tire failures on the road. Plus, there was never any intent to feed collected information back to tire manufacturers, as it was highly unlikely that any corrective action would be taken, based on the feedback from a small poll of a couple of hundred Airstream owners.
  • "Lacking the above facts makes this poll just a random collection of comments and of no real value."

    Your criticism belittles the real-world experiences of the poll participants. Each entry is an Airstream owner’s perception of a tire failure; and while it may not provide the information you seek, perception is reality for that owner. The information collected from participants met the goal of this poll, which was to determine the tires that failed and the circumstances surrounding those failures. And, many AirForums members have used this poll data when making subsequent tire buying decisions.

    Therefore, this poll is not “just a random collection of comments and of no real value”; because many members have switched to non-ST tires, and they have had fewer problems with them.
  • "If you do not have training is product failure analysis or statistics maybe you can understand the idea of also reporting the state of manufacturer of the RV. Bet we would find a very strong correlation of tire failures on RVs made in the state of OHIO."

    While this last comment was probably meant to be facetious, please know that I am a retired quality assurance manager who worked in the electronics manufacturing industry for over 40 years, and I do have extensive experience in product failure analysis and statistics.

    And, to be clear, I am being facetious in stating that:

    For the purpose of this poll, “the state of manufacture of the RV” is unnecessary; as unlike you, who do not own an Airstream, AirForums members know that most of our Airstreams were manufactured in Jackson Center, Ohio.

Respectfully,

Phoenix
Thanks for the thoughtful reply.
Easy one 1st. Yes I was being facetious about the state issue and while I do not own an Airstream I am aware that they are made here in Ohio.

The underlying point for my comments was that I did not understand the objective of simply collecting information on tire failure detail information if no meaningful corrective action could be the end result. If the only point was to confirm that owners suffered tire failures then a simple "Have you ever had a failure with ST tires? Yes/No would give the information.

If however the objective was to provide meaningful information on what to do to decrease the probability of a future failure then I felt that additional information was needed.

RE reporting DOT I do feel it might be helpful to know if the tires with failure were made in a plant owned by Goodyear or if the tire production had been outsourced to a low cost tire company but that information cannot be established from this poll.

RE knowing the DOT in the first place... I understand that collecting the S/N is low priority when you have had a failure but not having that information makes submitting a useful complaint to NHTSA impossible. I have suggested that all RV owners should spend a few minutes on a nice day and record the DOT for all their tires. That info should be placed in the file with other important documents. Then if there is a tire recall they can quickly check to see if their tires are covered. Also if there is a failure and they no longer have the tire or the DOT s/n is damaged they still have the number. Sometimes that might even make the difference between getting and not getting warranty on a tire failure so that number is important. Already knowing the DOT would also provide some owners with the knowledge that they are driving on tires"older" than they realized.

Finally one very important bit of information that is missing would be the answer to the question of actual tire loading. Knowing that tires that are overloaded or driven faster than their max speed rating results in higher failure rates would seem to me to be important information to know if you are trying to establish if a given tire is being abused which might be a reason for a higher failure rate.

IMO none of the information outlined in this post would be difficult to obtain nor does it need special training and who knows, it might even help identify a probable root cause for tire failure.

In closing I will point out some information that is overly detailed but also essentially meaningless. The ambient temperature of the time of failure. Properly loaded and maintained tires simply do not fail because it is 90F outside today or because they were driving 55 at the time of failure. Also the "normal" inflation in and of itself is no predictor of the probability of failure as that ignores tire or valve leaks or insufficient "normal" inflation for the load so that two owners with the same "normal" inflation could have completely different experiences if one was at 70% of load capacity and the other at 125% of capacity
__________________

__________________
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2016, 01:40 PM   #142
Rivet Master
 
ALANSD's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Woodstock , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 8,134
Interesting stuff. I am running 5 year old Chinesium tires. NO problems or splitting or cracking yet. I typically don't tow at over 60MPH so that might influence the results I am getting.
__________________

__________________
1966 Overlander
AIR #005
Please visit our blogs and web pages:
OUR AIRSTREAM PASSION! BLOG
RESTORING AN AIRSTREAM
Our AIRSTREAM and TIN CAN TOURIST Rallys
ALANSD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 11:49 AM   #143
Rivet Master
 
2005 19' Safari
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,366
Re: "This poll is just a random collection of comments and of no real value" - Cont.

Sorry to keep cutting and pasting; but I think it may be easier to follow my responses (in BLUE), if they immediately follow your comments:
  • "The underlying point for my comments was that I did not understand the objective of simply collecting information on tire failure detail information if no meaningful corrective action could be the end result. If the only point was to confirm that owners suffered tire failures then a simple "Have you ever had a failure with ST tires? Yes/No would give the information.

    "If however the objective was to provide meaningful information on what to do to decrease the probability of a future failure then I felt that additional information was needed."

    In 2011, there were a lot of tire posts. However, there was no way to make any sense of the tires that were problematic, the Airstream models affected, or the most common failure modes. It just seemed that everyone was reporting "bad" tires. (For those who have never worked in a factory, the term "bad" is meaningless; and its use is frustrating to those who must review and disposition discrepant material.) While the poll format could have been better, please recognize that this was a first attempt at collecting any type of tire data; and the underlying BBS software was not designed to support complex data collection that would normally be done to investigate field failures on manufactured products.

    Also, most Airstream owners do have the DOT serial numbers on their tire purchase receipts and warranty documents. However, many do not have this information available when a tire failure occurs while traveling. Plus, most Airstreams lack extra storage space for huge shredded pieces of tire carcasses with protruding wire spikes; and it’s impractical to carry this evidence around for the balance of a multi-thousand mile roadtrip, until one returns home where the tire documents are stored.


  • "RE reporting DOT I do feel it might be helpful to know if the tires with failure were made in a plant owned by Goodyear or if the tire production had been outsourced to a low cost tire company but that information cannot be established from this poll.

    "RE knowing the DOT in the first place... I understand that collecting the S/N is low priority when you have had a failure but not having that information makes submitting a useful complaint to NHTSA impossible. I have suggested that all RV owners should spend a few minutes on a nice day and record the DOT for all their tires. That info should be placed in the file with other important documents. Then if there is a tire recall they can quickly check to see if their tires are covered. Also if there is a failure and they no longer have the tire or the DOT s/n is damaged they still have the number. Sometimes that might even make the difference between getting and not getting warranty on a tire failure so that number is important. Already knowing the DOT would also provide some owners with the knowledge that they are driving on tires"older" than they realized."

    I agree that this information would be useful for a tire manufacturer’s troubleshooting team to determine cause and corrective action. However, I’m sure you will agree that Goodyear upper management would never become aware of, or act on the data from our small poll, regardless of the information it contained. After all, a few hundred trailer owners claiming tire failures caused a few thousand dollars’ worth of damage is a miniscule problem, probably buried on a single desk, in a large global corporation that produces millions of tires every year.

    However, money out-of-pocket to prematurely replace failed tires and to repair Airstream damage is a big thing to an RV owner. Perhaps, if there were a few hundred deaths annually, or Airstreams caught fire and exploded when their tires failed, and video was included in the lead story on the evening news, we could hope for a little attention.

    Thus, collection of more detailed data seemed unnecessary.


  • "Finally one very important bit of information that is missing would be the answer to the question of actual tire loading. Knowing that tires that are overloaded or driven faster than their max speed rating results in higher failure rates would seem to me to be important information to know if you are trying to establish if a given tire is being abused which might be a reason for a higher failure rate."

    Regarding tire loads and cruising speeds, the BBS software only allows boxes to be selected (check-marked), and there is no way to collect specific data on these parameters. However, some generalized trends can be obtained by determining the number of axles on a member’s Airstream (fewer axles generally have higher tire loading, with single axle Bambi’s having the highest per-tire load) and looking at the corresponding selections for the questions regarding “My Airstream is towed on: (road type)”, at the end of the Tire Failure Poll.

    Note: One can analyze an individual voter’s responses by clicking on the value in the “number of responses” column, which will reveal voter screen names. Then, one can review all of the poll responses entered by a single member. This will expose more information on a specific tire failure, including the approximate ambient temperature, tire age in years and miles, tire size and load range, inflation pressure, etc. Again, this is very cumbersome and time consuming; but that’s a limitation of the BBS software.


  • "IMO none of the information outlined in this post would be difficult to obtain nor does it need special training and who knows, it might even help identify a probable root cause for tire failure."

    Again, the purpose of this poll was to provide enough information, anecdotal or otherwise, to assist AirForums members in making future tire-buying decisions. Some may determine that less-expensive ST tires work fine for their application (e.g., multiple-axle Airstreams that are used in cooler climes); while others (e.g., owners with Bambi’s that have relatively high per-tire loads, and tow at 75 mph in 120-degree southwest desert heat) may seek more reliable (and more expensive) tire solutions. For the latter, the new Airstream NON-ST Tire Poll may provide the information they are looking for.

  • "In closing I will point out some information that is overly detailed but also essentially meaningless. The ambient temperature of the time of failure. Properly loaded and maintained tires simply do not fail because it is 90F outside today or because they were driving 55 at the time of failure. Also the "normal" inflation in and of itself is no predictor of the probability of failure as that ignores tire or valve leaks or insufficient "normal" inflation for the load so that two owners with the same "normal" inflation could have completely different experiences if one was at 70% of load capacity and the other at 125% of capacity"

    While the inclusion or exclusion of certain information may be of interest to you as a tire professional, I suspect general trends are sufficient for most Airstream owners, whose decisions are not based on a small percentage difference between poll responses. For many of us, a “50% tire failure rate” is sufficient justification to look at different tire solutions.

Tireman9, I realize that your interests drill down deeper than the data collected in this poll; and you need more details for analysis. Perhaps, a poll that addresses the specifics you seek is in your future. I would be happy to participate in a poll of your design.
__________________
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 12:50 PM   #144
CapriRacer
 
CapriRacer's Avatar
 
I'm in the , US
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 539
I found this interesting:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
....... In 2011, there were a lot of tire posts. However, there was no way to make any sense of the tires that were problematic, the Airstream models affected, or the most common failure modes. ..........
Here we are 5 years later and while there are still a lot of tire posts, not anything like it was before.

Further, I don't recall any recent posts on recent ST tire failures (say, this year!) Is it possible that improvements have been made and no one noticed? This is what happened when I was working and tracking failures. It was my job to notice, but I had fairly good data to work with.

And just to fill in the blanks: It should be expected that tire failures will not completely go away. Hardly anyone - including retail tire shop personnel - can identify a tire that failed due to a road hazard unless they actually see the puncturing object - and even then there are folks who will misidentify the cause of failure.
__________________
CapriRacer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 02:05 PM   #145
Rivet Master
 
2005 19' Safari
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,366
Re: Reduction of ST Tire Failures?

I have no data to support this, but my gut feeling from following the various tire threads is that ST tires continue to fail, with GYM being reported most often, and Carlisle, Maxxis and other brands having mixed results. If there is an improvement in ST tire reliability, there are still a significant number of ST tires being replaced due to failure, versus just wearing out.

It appears an increasing number of Airstreams are coming from the factory with Sendel 16" wheels and LT tires (either Michelin LTX M/S2 or Defender LTX M/S, which appear to have almost identical specs). Some of these LT tires ship as original equipment, while others are being purchased as a factory-installed upgrade; or owners are switching to LT tires immediately after accepting delivery.

Besides LT tires, some AirForums members are also switching to P and XL tires, with some success. Current percentages on the new Airstream NON-ST Tire Poll seem to indicate about a 10% failure rate on P, XL and LT tire combined totals.

If one uses the total of number of "voters" on both the Airstream Tire Failure Poll (which ended up being mostly an ST tire poll) and the Airstream NON-ST Tire Poll, and makes a huge assumption (which may be entirely incorrect) that all NON-ST POLL voters previously voted on the ST POLL before converting to non-ST tires, it appears that about 28% (82/286) of AirForums members have switched to non-ST tires. (Please note, that this is a giant leap assumption, which may be no more accurate than picking numbers on a roulette wheel.) However, this may account for the seeming decrease in ST tire failures being reported.

Another ST tire poll may identify what's happening with current production ST tires, but I'm not sure anyone really wants more tire polls. I suspect that like the upcoming presidential election, most AirForums members have already chosen sides; and more data will not alter anyone's opinion.

Perhaps, someone should run a poll to see whether we have about beaten this subject to death.
__________________
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 02:21 PM   #146
Rivet Master

 
Vintage Kin Owner
North central , Florida
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 5,553
Mich ltx are not LT tires in every case.
__________________
1984 Avion 30p 9.1 meter. 2006 Dodge 3500 cummins srw short bed crew cab.
avionstream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-11-2016, 10:27 PM   #147
Rivet Master
 
Ravenna , Ohio
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 589
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALANSD View Post
Interesting stuff. I am running 5 year old Chinesium tires. NO problems or splitting or cracking yet. I typically don't tow at over 60MPH so that might influence the results I am getting.
Yes running a reasonable amount under the max speed rating of ST type tires (65) could have an affect on having a failure or not.

For those that want to mention that some newer ST type tires have speed rating higher than 65 need to remember that the primary reason St tires have load capacity rating higher than LT type tires is that their load formula is based on a 65 mph max speed rating.

IMO if you remove that limit then a tire with ST or LT on the sidewall should have the same load capacity rating if the speed & inflation are to be the same. To think otherwise means you do not believe in or understand Science and Physics.
__________________

__________________
Tireman9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
st tire failure poll


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NEW: 5th Wheel Airstream Airtrekker Boondocking 38 06-25-2016 10:52 PM
Where not to buy an airstream scorpiontimo Off Topic Forum 25 04-27-2011 06:09 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.