Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-15-2010, 11:31 AM   #1
3 Rivet Member
 
tvanwave's Avatar
 
1991 34' Limited
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 201
Air Gauge Calibration

Is there any need or way to caliabrate/ check the accuarcy of an air gauge? If my gauge is off #10 for example my tires may be in danger. My gauge runs from 20-120 pounds and is made by Syracuse.
__________________

__________________
Air Cid
2000 F250SD Crew Cab 4x4 V10
Reese WD Hitch
tvanwave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 12:04 PM   #2
_
 
. , .
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 8,812
most tire pressure gauges have a +/- accuracy range listed somewhere...

on the package or on a vendor website.

none of the modestly prices gauges can be 'calibrated' if that means internally adjusted...

some more expensive units can be tweaked but usually this is done by the vendor.

the typical PENCIL gauge is not adjustable, some dial versions are, most digital versions aren't.
_______

with pencils style gauges (and the markings they display)....

a 20-120 scale wouldn't be ideal for 31 psi tires IF the goal is tight adjustments.

because the scale isn't big enough.

but for 80 psi tires it would be fine IF the goal is +/- 1-2%

AND the gauge is advertised for that margin of error.

many of the currently available digital gauges offer readings of 0.1 psi increments.

this appears MORE accurate

but that is only true IF the transducer inside AND the housing combine to give reliable readings...

some rotary/dial display gauges have INTERCHANGEable dials

with W I D E R readings depending on range.
__________

it's useful to at least try several tire pressure gauges together and look for consistent readings.

consistent for EACH gauge and consistent BETWEEN gauges, over a wide range of pressures.
_________

for tires requiring 40 psi or less i use a different gauge than for tires in the 80 psi range.

for tires on tracking/performance tuned cars i use a different gauge...

than on the truck or trayla tires.

bicycles get their own measuring device too.
_________

i have found that many battery powered led gauges...

get weird when COLD or after being dropped...

and many of the digital/lectric transducer versions SELF CALIBRATE at altitude...

i think this means after being turned ON,

they internally adjust to atmospheric pressures, BEFORE touching the valve stem.
__________

so IF u get a good one of any style that is reliably accurate,

keep it in a semi protected place...

and don't use it as a hammer,

unless it needs 'adjusting'

cheers
2air'
__________________

__________________
all of the true things that i am about to tell you are shameless lies. l.b.j.

we are here on earth to fart around. don't let anybody tell you any different. k.v.
2airishuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 12:07 PM   #3
4 Rivet Member
 
kennethowens's Avatar
 
1975 Argosy 24
Malakoff , Texas
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 490
yep....buy three of them and trust two of the three
__________________
kennethowens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 12:10 PM   #4
4 Rivet Member
 
1971 29' Ambassador
Leonardtown , Maryland
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 262
Images: 3
Not trying to be funny, but dollars equates to accuracy. An inexpensive gauge, meaning one less than $10 could have as much as a 10% accuracy and if it is a mechanical device it is prone to binding.
I have had many problems with tires and depend greatly on a good quality, digital tire pressire gauge, original cost $20+.
I am kind of old school, One only gets what one pays for.
Good luck on your quest.
__________________
_________________

Rebee - WBCCI #1325
2002 Classic Ltd 30'
2007 Dodge 2500, 6.7 Cummins
Rebee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 01:05 PM   #5
Moderator
 
Kevin245's Avatar

 
Vintage Kin Owner
... , ...
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,390
Images: 9
There are test labs that perform gauge calibrations but unless you have an expensive gauge you may find that the calibration cost will exceed the gauge value. Syracuse makes some good equipment so you'd need to consider what works out best for you.

Repeatability and accuracy are usually commensurate with cost, and to me there's a piece mind in having a quality gauge on hand. Decent quality gauges with accuracies of +/- 1% to 3% can be purchased for around $25.

Good Luck,

Kevin
__________________

"You wouldn't worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do."

Eleanor Roosevelt

Kevin245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 02:04 PM   #6
3 Rivet Member
 
tvanwave's Avatar
 
1991 34' Limited
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 201
All good points. My pen style gauge is about 15 years old and seems to work OK but without a way to check its accuracy against some standard its an assessment against an unkown. I guess i could buy another gauge and assume that both are correct or wrong to the same degree. 1-3% of 65 or 80 pounds isnt much of a tolerable error so is a good digital the best way to go? Still that calibration issue though it sounds. If expectations are to carefully air tires for load, conditions, tire ratings, climate, etc how much error in a reading (pounds) will make a difference? Then - is the variability in gauge performance outside or inside that range?
__________________
Air Cid
2000 F250SD Crew Cab 4x4 V10
Reese WD Hitch
tvanwave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 02:55 PM   #7
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
I have several gauges (one built into the tire filler, one in the traylah tool bay, one in the truck, one in the car, one quite accurate one in the rollaround tool cabinet) and occasionally cross check them. I don't know any other way to check them.

If they're off by more than 4 or 5 pounds I discard the gauge.
__________________
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 04:07 PM   #8
_
 
. , .
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 8,812
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvanwave View Post
... My pen style gauge is about 15 years old and seems to work OK...
here's the thing...

do whatever u do 4 the car or truck in yer life.

why even ASK if satisfied with the 15 yr old version?

n fact Y even worry about gauge readings NOW...

if it's not an issue on daily driven things?

keep on keepn on...

cheers
2air'
__________________
all of the true things that i am about to tell you are shameless lies. l.b.j.

we are here on earth to fart around. don't let anybody tell you any different. k.v.
2airishuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 04:15 PM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
tvanwave's Avatar
 
1991 34' Limited
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 201
Just found this on blog.rv.net


We often talk about the importance of checking the inflation pressure in tires, but is your tire pressure gauge giving you accurate information? After writing my article titled, “Take the Visual RV Tire Test” I received several emails regarding the accuracy of tire pressure gauges.

One person commented, “I understand that tire pressure in an RV is crucial and can cause serious problems if not inflated correctly. Well, the problem is this, how do you know if the tire gauge is accurate? I have seen two tire gauges show as much as 16 psi difference on the same tire. Is there a recommendation as to which tire gauges are the most accurate?”
What’s funny about this is for many years, as a Maintenance Warrant Officer in the Army, I was responsible for tool calibration programs. Certain tools required regular calibration to ensure accuracy. I use a quality tire pressure gauge, but after reading this question realized that after several years of using this gauge I have never had it checked for accuracy.
Many of the really inexpensive gauges ($5) you can purchase can’t be calibrated, and if the reading is inaccurate the gauge is worthless. This is why you should spend a little more ($15-$25) and get a quality pressure gauge that can be calibrated. I am a real believer in the old saying; you get what you pay for.
If you have any doubt about the accuracy of your tire pressure gauge there are a couple things you can do to check it.
1) You can check the air pressure in a tire with the gauge in question and then check the same tire with another gauge. If there is a significant difference in the readings (4 or more psi) between the two gauges one or both gauges may be inaccurate. If both gauges read within 1 to 2 psi of each other the gauges are more than likely accurate.
2) If you want a more precise method for checking the accuracy take the gauge to a local tire dealer or fleet truck maintenance facility and ask them to check it using a master gauge. A master gauge is a gauge that is certified to be accurate. But I caution you there are lots of tire dealers who don’t have their own tire pressure gauges calibrated.
Note: Don’t depend on pressure gauges at gas stations to be accurate. These are usually abused and neglected, raising concern over accuracy.
There are several different types of pressure gauges available on the market. One important thing to keep in mind is the pressure the gauge is rated for. Most automobile tires are inflated to around 32 psi, so a 0 to 60 psi gauge is sufficient. On the other hand some motorhome tires are inflated to 100 or more psi. It is important, for accuracy and to prevent damage to the gauge, that you get the right gauge for the job. A general rule of thumb is to find a gauge that can read double what the inflation pressure is set at. This isn’t always possible especially with tires inflated to 100 psi, so find a gauge rated for high pressure, like 160 psi.
Possibly the most common type of pressure gauge is the plunge or pencil type. Some of these are calibrated and some of the cheaper ones are not. As a general rule a common plunge type gauge you would purchase will be accurate to + or – 3 psi when it is new. The accuracy of these type gauges are also affected by temperature, humidity and altitude.
Note: Always check the tire pressure when the tires are cold, before traveling. If you check the tires when they are hot you will get a false (higher) reading and if you let air out of the tires they can be seriously underinflated when they are cold.
Like everything else these days’ things are switching from analog to digital. Analog tire pressure gauges were the standard for many years, but advancements in digital technology have improved on that standard. Analog dial gauges are about as accurate as the quality pencil type gauges. In numerous tests comparing different type gauges digital gauges were the most accurate tested.
Regardless of the type of gauge you choose there are high quality and low quality gauges available. Buying a cheap digital gauge would be the same as buying a cheap pencil type gauge. Here are a few things to keep in mind when it comes to tire pressure gauges.
1) Spend a few more dollars and get a quality pressure gauge.
2) If the gauge will be used for checking dual wheels on a motorhome the chuck end of the gauge should have a dual foot design to make the job much easier.
3) Always select a gauge rated higher than the inflation pressure of the tires you are checking. Applying more pressure than the gauge is rated for can damage the gauge and affect the accuracy. If you over-pressure a gauge have it tested for accuracy.
4) Try not to drop or jar the gauge. Store the gauge in some type of protective covering or case and in an area where it won’t be hit or damaged.
5) Periodically have the gauge tested for accuracy. At a minimum compare it to another quality gauge to see if both read the same, or close to the same pressure.
6) Most importantly, once you purchase a quality pressure gauge use it on a regular basis to check your RV and automobile tires.
Remember, properly inflated tires are safer, extend the life of the tires, improve fuel efficiency and lessen the chance of unexpected and premature tire failure.
__________________
Air Cid
2000 F250SD Crew Cab 4x4 V10
Reese WD Hitch
tvanwave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 04:44 PM   #10
Don't forget your cat nap
 
Ag&Au's Avatar
 
Port Orchard , Washington
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 4,464
Images: 1
I have several tire gauges and they all read close enough for me +/- 4 PSI or so.

What I use for a standard is my TPMS sensors. They are calibrated accurately in barometric chambers before they leave the factory. I have found them to be remarkably consistent. There are 10 of them.

I have had one sensor go bad, but it was off by 20+ PSI, (pretty easy to verify).

When I check the tires before a trip, I inflate using my best guage and then go check the readings on the TPMS. If all the tires were off, I would assume my guage was wrong. If only one was off, I'd assume the TPMS sensor was bad.

Keep in mind that your tire pressure will vary depending on the elevation at your location, as well as ambient temperature, etc. Your tires can go up a PSI or two if you inflated during fair weather and a storm comes by. If I inflate my tires here in Colorado and then drive to the seashore, my pressure will be lower. So to me, its a "in the ball park" game.

On other thing: Keep in mind that tire pressure are specified as cold. In other words, measure them in the morning before the sun has shone on any of the tires.
Regards,

Ken
__________________
Ag&Au is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 05:37 PM   #11
3 Rivet Member
 
tvanwave's Avatar
 
1991 34' Limited
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2airishuman View Post
here's the thing...

do whatever u do 4 the car or truck in yer life.

why even ASK if satisfied with the 15 yr old version?

n fact Y even worry about gauge readings NOW...

if it's not an issue on daily driven things?

keep on keepn on...

cheers
2air'
Right, 2Air but like many, i assume, my TV tires get checked every 5K miles by my service station when I get an oil change and I dont think about tire pressure again. Now that I have a 8500 lb trailer behind me with 6 more tires, and they never see a svc station, all the posts here are making me rethink my previous lifestyle. As a now converted tire-pressue devotee I want to know and live by the truth and not my airless/ clueless past. Looks like a good digital is the true path.
__________________
Air Cid
2000 F250SD Crew Cab 4x4 V10
Reese WD Hitch
tvanwave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 06:52 PM   #12
_
 
. , .
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 8,812
Quote:
Originally Posted by tvanwave View Post
... like many, i assume, my TV tires get checked every 5K miles by my service station when I get an oil change and I dont think about tire pressure again...
yeah, that' pretty much what we all do.

the secret is to extend the oil change intervals to 15,000 miles...

which reduces those annoying tire checks 3 fold.
_______

just pump those tires for a good long while,

then stick on that pencil gauge...

haMMer in the scale till it settle at 65 psi,

thatz what the tires are supposed to be blowed up 2, right?

then yer gauge is calibrated.
________

and what's the deal with dragging long useless quotes from other websites here?

just post a link and hope people can figure out HOW 2 CLICK on the blue letters...

not only are these quotes anonymous and filled with nonsense...

but the author isn't around 2 field questions.

it's great to find a solid reference and share it,

but a post from another site typically isn't either of those things...



cheers
2air'
__________________
all of the true things that i am about to tell you are shameless lies. l.b.j.

we are here on earth to fart around. don't let anybody tell you any different. k.v.
2airishuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 07:08 PM   #13
3 Rivet Member
 
tvanwave's Avatar
 
1991 34' Limited
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 201
Just trying to be helpful
__________________
Air Cid
2000 F250SD Crew Cab 4x4 V10
Reese WD Hitch
tvanwave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-15-2010, 10:15 PM   #14
Site Team
 
azflycaster's Avatar
 
1975 25' Tradewind
Dewey , Arizona
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 12,127
Images: 62
Blog Entries: 1
I have an Accutire tire pressure gauge and I check my tires before every trip. Last trip out the first tire I checked showed to be about 20 PSI low and I start looking for a nail or screw in the tire. I don't find any, so I drag out the hose to put some air into the tire. When I put the filler tool on the tire, it shows that it is right on. I then check the next tire with the Accutire gauge and it shows low just like the first, and then I notice that it is really only showing a few pounds of pressure because there is a decimal point between the two numbers. That is when I notice that instead of displaying PSI it is displaying BAR. Too many options on the digital gauges.

BTW, 1 PSI = 0.0689475728001037 BAR
__________________

__________________

Richard

Wally Byam Airstream Club 7513
azflycaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
MicroPulse Calibration For Battery jeff4506 Batteries, Univolts, Converters & Inverters 9 03-06-2017 06:41 PM
Micro Pulse Tank monitor calibration Silvertwinkie Plumbing - Systems & Fixtures 98 11-03-2014 02:09 PM
Duo-Therm Thermostat out of calibration? silverback Furnaces, Heaters, Fireplaces & Air Conditioning 2 05-03-2009 06:55 AM
GM Gauge that will tell you EVERYTHING JeepinAudiophile Tow Vehicles 1 08-15-2005 03:38 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.