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Old 02-27-2013, 08:07 PM   #15
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Point taken on the Carlisles....stay far away....

New axles are on the way...so once in place clearance will undoubtedly change, but given today's measurements, the MichelinLT235/75R15 will be too close to the skin apron particularly on the front tires. So I am left with the following near 15x7 sizing:
1) Continental Vanco 2 215/70/15 LR-D
2) Maxxis M8008 ST Radial
3) Yokohama RY 215 7r15LT

Tomorrow is the last day of the discount tire sale and they are seeing what of these three are available. If anybody has a strong visceral view feel free to spew it out....
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:42 PM   #16
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@ Action: I'll state it a different way then.

Imagine how a normal person would feel if they caused a death due to ignoring the advice of someone with decades of experience on the topic.
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Old 02-27-2013, 09:51 PM   #17
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@ Action: I'll state it a different way then.

Imagine how a normal person would feel if they caused a death due to ignoring the advice of someone with decades of experience on the topic.
I'll point out here that CapriRacer is a tire engineer. If I'm going to choose between them on tire advice, I think I'd go with the tire engineer.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:40 PM   #18
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Thanks DKB, that sounds reasonable in the context of that application outlined by CapriRacer.

I have question/concerns (not being sarcastic).
So IF there is risk of wheel damage by using that wheel/tire assembly in a higher rated application, I would still have reservations. Reason is the wheel/tire assembly has a lower rating than is indicated on the tire. That assembly might be on a flatbed trailer next year (with a new owner) and used according to the tire's rating resulting in wheel damage.

Second one, doesn't the higher rated tire have a stiffer sidewall? One concern regarding stiffer rides is possible AS damage, ie missing rivits.

I have some other tire questions but I'll start a new thread for those CapriRacer; I hope that you'll chime in because I'd like to get your thoughts.
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Old 02-28-2013, 07:53 AM   #19
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First, I want to thank folks for the vote of confidence. I'm not an RV'er. My intent is to help folks with tire questions - and as you all know, there's a lot of strongly held opinions with very little evidence. I want to cut through that to get at the "truth" - as best I can.

So onto the questions:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Done View Post
Thanks DKB, that sounds reasonable in the context of that application outlined by CapriRacer.

I have question/concerns (not being sarcastic).
So IF there is risk of wheel damage by using that wheel/tire assembly in a higher rated application, I would still have reservations. Reason is the wheel/tire assembly has a lower rating than is indicated on the tire. That assembly might be on a flatbed trailer next year (with a new owner) and used according to the tire's rating resulting in wheel damage......
I can appreciate the thought, but I think we're talking about a situation where the trailer is an RV and there's a problem to be solved. The load on the tire isn't changing, it's a question of using a tire with a higher POTENTIAL load carrying capacity - and that's going in the right direction. What happens later - when things are not in the hands of the guy who makes such a change - is an unlikely situation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Not Done View Post
.......

Second one, doesn't the higher rated tire have a stiffer sidewall? One concern regarding stiffer rides is possible AS damage, ie missing rivits........
Yes, they have a stiffer sidewall, but it isn't like the tire is TWICE as stiff. If a trailer can't withstand that small difference, then it was only a matter of time before the problems would have surfaced anyway.


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......
I have some other tire questions but I'll start a new thread for those CapriRacer; I hope that you'll chime in because I'd like to get your thoughts.
My pleasure. Always available to questions.
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:17 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CapriRacer View Post
First, I want to thank folks for the vote of confidence. I'm not an RV'er. My intent is to help folks with tire questions - and as you all know, there's a lot of strongly held opinions with very little evidence. I want to cut through that to get at the "truth" - as best I can.

So onto the questions:


I can appreciate the thought, but I think we're talking about a situation where the trailer is an RV and there's a problem to be solved. The load on the tire isn't changing, it's a question of using a tire with a higher POTENTIAL load carrying capacity - and that's going in the right direction. What happens later - when things are not in the hands of the guy who makes such a change - is an unlikely situation.


Yes, they have a stiffer sidewall, but it isn't like the tire is TWICE as stiff. If a trailer can't withstand that small difference, then it was only a matter of time before the problems would have surfaced anyway.

My pleasure. Always available to questions.


Your thought's on updating old wheels from "C" that was used for many years, to "D" rating tires, or "E" ratings.

I was told many times that the wheel will split.

Dozens of times, that has been reported to me over the years.

Some say impossible.

Andy
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:14 AM   #21
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Your thought's on updating old wheels from "C" that was used for many years, to "D" rating tires, or "E" ratings.

I was told many times that the wheel will split.

Dozens of times, that has been reported to me over the years.

Some say impossible.

Andy
I don't see the failure mechanism.

If the load on the wheel is the same, why would the wheel fail?

But if we talk about using a Load Range E tires in place of a Load Range C - AND - inflating the LR E to 80 psi (instead of the LR C's 50 psi), that I could believe.

- BUT -

A Load Range E inflated to 50 psi has the same load carrying capacity as a Load Range C does at 50 psi. I don't think the minor differences in tire construction is enough to be the difference between wheels failing and not.

And lastly, I have been trying to find wheel engineers to ask this question: If the load on the wheel is the same, if more inflation pressure is used, how significant is the increase in stress on the wheel?

I originally suspected that the difference is small as if this were important, wheels would be routinely marked with a maximum inflation pressure - but they aren't.

I did stumble on a wheel designer once (not quite an engineer) and he said that the load was the only thing they considered. That's not quite enough confirmation for my taste, so I am continuing my quest.

And lastly, I can absolutely believe that people have taken a wheel designed for a Load Range C and put it where a Load Range D or E tire is needed - and the wheel failed - and here's the tricky part: They would report this as the difference in Load Range, not the difference in load.
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:35 AM   #22
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I think the wheel failure (if any) may be caused by the higher air pressures that some inflate the tires to when using "D" and "E" rated tires on rims designed for "C" rated tires. Plus installing tires that are meant for a wider rim.
I believe the rims on my Argosy are original. They are stamped with a load rating of 2,600 pounds at 65 psi MAX.
I think if I were to install "E" rated tires on these rims and inflate them to the 80 psi max. There would be an increase in the wheel failure risk.
I run "D" rated tires at 55#. So far 10,000 miles and no problems. I limit my speed to 60 mph.
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:03 AM   #23
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I have a similar question and slightly different.

If the load capacity is "X" is with standard steel wheel and "C" rated tire inflated to max stamped on tire. What advantage is accomplisted by changing to a "D" or "E" rated tire and inflating to less than max ? (and still acceptable for the rim.)

From what was stated above there is no greater capacity in load based on lower inflation rate of "D" or "E" rated tire. And may be the answer is more complex than I state the question just not sure.

>>>Action
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:11 AM   #24
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I have a similar question and slightly different.

If the load capacity is "X" is with standard steel wheel and "C" rated tire inflated to max stamped on tire. What advantage is accomplisted by changing to a "D" or "E" rated tire and inflating to less than max ? (and still acceptable for the rim.)

From what was stated above there is no greater capacity in load based on lower inflation rate of "D" or "E" rated tire. And may be the answer is more complex than I state the question just not sure.

>>>Action
Ready availability of replacement tires. My '75 Argosy came to me with LRC tires, 3 of which match my rated gross weight for the trailer so they were sufficient. No one seemed to stock the C tires, even though Carlisle said they manufacture them.

My solution was to go the Michelin LTX route, but if you want to stick with STs it might be necessary to move to a D or E to get the tires easily from your local tire dealer.
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:23 AM   #25
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I can relate as the tire world is not static.

On a much different vehicle (1974 E -100 that was special ordered - go figure) I had a 14" rim with a factory equipped "E" rated tires. When it came time to replace the factory tires I request the stock set up. "E" rated tires in a 14" rim were very rare. I was much more ignorant of tires and rating that I am now. Based on future load (there really wasn't any) and cost I elected to move farther down the alphabet rating scale.

>>>>>>Action
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Old 03-01-2013, 10:18 AM   #26
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I originally suspected that the difference is small as if this were important, wheels would be routinely marked with a maximum inflation pressure - but they aren't.
Quality wheels always have either a label with the maximum air pressure on them, or the wheel is stamped.

Andy
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Old 03-01-2013, 11:44 AM   #27
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Quality wheels always have either a label with the maximum air pressure on them, or the wheel is stamped.

Andy
2 thoughts:

Next to my office is a room chock full of wheels - and most of them are OE wheels - and I don't think there is a one that has max pressure stamped on the wheel.

If max pressure were so important, wouldn't that be stamped on the wheel, and not on a label that can be removed - regardless of quality?
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Old 03-01-2013, 12:00 PM   #28
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Quote:
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I have a similar question and slightly different.

If the load capacity is "X" is with standard steel wheel and "C" rated tire inflated to max stamped on tire. What advantage is accomplisted by changing to a "D" or "E" rated tire and inflating to less than max ? (and still acceptable for the rim.)

From what was stated above there is no greater capacity in load based on lower inflation rate of "D" or "E" rated tire. And may be the answer is more complex than I state the question just not sure.

>>>Action
Well 1 reason is that it has been reported that tires lose as much as 30% of their strength in 5 years so a D or E tire inflated to the pressure of a C would still have the capacity of a new C rated tire after 5 years.
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