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Old 01-09-2014, 01:59 PM   #1
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Where to get new axles installed?

I am looking at a variety of early 70s AS and Agrosys. I have to assume that the axles brakes and rotors have not been replaced given the price point I am looking at.

I called Jackson Center, which is a few hours away and was told that each axle with springs would be About 1500 plus a three to four week wait for parts.

I had previously called one of the axle manufacturers out in CA and was told a complete set up is 750ish plus freight.

Would you get your axles replaced locally if you could get it done at Jackson Center?

If you would do it locally, any suggestions where I should consider near Cincinnati. I want to be ready in the event the unit I get is as found and might need to be towed in on a flatbed
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Old 01-09-2014, 02:59 PM   #2
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The factory price probably isn't too far off when you consider the axle cost, freight and labor hours to install.
Any decent trailer shop could install the axles as long as they get the correct axle with shock mounts and proper weight rating.
Axles typically take a few weeks to get manufactured and sent out to you.
If your a DIY person you can do the job yourself for less money.
You may also want to contact Colin Hyde for axle pricing.
I have changed 3 sets of axles so feel free to ask questions. Also I am located near you - 10 miles south of Cincy.
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Old 01-09-2014, 03:27 PM   #3
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Thanks. Quote I got was from inlandRV. While I DIY a lot, I have not tinkered with much mechanical beyond rebuilding some older power woodworking tools.

Given the safety issues, need for alignment etc it seems like a job for someone with experience.

I just called Colerain RV. They were willing to do the job with parts I have delivered. Their hourly rate is 121. So with the axle set at 750 and the shocks another 120, plus freight, that would likely only leave a few hours work for break even. Seems like a job for Jackson center. More importantly this helps me figure out what to pay for a trailer. At least I know I'll have at least a 3k charge, plus tires, before I find out what else is broken and in need of repair or replacement.
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Old 01-10-2014, 09:18 AM   #4
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Swapping the axles is one of the easier projects for a vintage trailer in "original" condition. If you order your axles from a knowledgeable source (ie., Inland or Colin Hyde), then you will get the proper axle for your trailer, sized correctly, etc.. When it comes to installation, it is really a matter of removing 4 bolts per axle, dropping the old ones, and putting the new ones in place. You may have do a little drill work to get the new holes in the brackets to line up with the originals, but it is no big deal. The axles should come pre-cambered, and there is no alignment necessary, as they fit into slots on the mounting plate, and there is no wiggle room. There are the inherent hazards of jacking up, and working under a vehicle, but if you are looking for a "cheap" trailer that is going to require a lot of refurbishment anyway, you will soon discover that the axle replacement is not a big deal.

good luck!
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Old 01-10-2014, 09:33 AM   #5
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Swapping the axles on my previous trailer was actually vastly easier than I thought. It took a morning and I worked by myself. You'll need a good jack and some jack stands plus an impact gun but really if you get the right axles for the trailer it is like Lego. Highly recommend Colin Hyde too.
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Old 01-11-2014, 08:40 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Belegedhel View Post
Swapping the axles is one of the easier projects for a vintage trailer in "original" condition. If you order your axles from a knowledgeable source (ie., Inland or Colin Hyde), then you will get the proper axle for your trailer, sized correctly, etc.. When it comes to installation, it is really a matter of removing 4 bolts per axle, dropping the old ones, and putting the new ones in place. You may have do a little drill work to get the new holes in the brackets to line up with the originals, but it is no big deal. The axles should come pre-cambered, and there is no alignment necessary, as they fit into slots on the mounting plate, and there is no wiggle room. There are the inherent hazards of jacking up, and working under a vehicle, but if you are looking for a "cheap" trailer that is going to require a lot of refurbishment anyway, you will soon discover that the axle replacement is not a big deal.



good luck!

I was wondering about alignment particularly given that there are two Great to hear that I can install myself. I am always up for buying more tools in lieu of having someone else do the job. axles.
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Old 01-11-2014, 10:26 AM   #7
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Colin Hyde has very good price for axles, very knowleagble, the axles from Colin does not req. any drilliing or other mods simply bolt in place, word of warning bolt shocks on axles before raising in pos. Don't ask how I no. Bill
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Old 01-13-2014, 05:35 PM   #8
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I used Colin also. I think you will find that if you are a halfway competent mechanic you can replace 2 axles for about 1400 dollars. the shocks are going to run about 100-120 for a set of four and then new tires.

I would rather do it myself and save a few grand, its not rocket science. They are just heavy. PB blaster or WD40 a few times on the nuts before you start is probably the best advice.
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Old 01-19-2014, 04:08 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RhinoWW View Post
I was wondering about alignment particularly given that there are two Great to hear that I can install myself. I am always up for buying more tools in lieu of having someone else do the job. axles.
The axles bolt back into the original slot, using the original bolt holes, so no alignment is necessary, unless the trailer has been in some sort of accident & potentially bent the chassis. Most DIY type people don't have any issues installing them, but if you feel uncomfortable, any mechanic or trailer shop can do it.
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Old 01-19-2014, 05:03 PM   #10
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install

I did the install with a mechanic friend at his shop. about 4.5 hours with air tools. Not complicated, just heavy, as said earlier. John
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Old 01-20-2014, 01:49 AM   #11
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A floor jack helps with the "heavy" of the axles, jack holds up an end of an axle so you can plug in bolts on the other end. Disc brakes are good, require an "actuator" controller to push the hydraulic fluid. The older models with disc brakes had similar to a vacuum booster to push the hydraulic fluid and hooked to the car vacuum, there are new actuators that work off the new brake controllers for that. You need a very solid dedicated 30 Amp power line to the trailer battery for the actuator, and even better ground wire. A lot of us believe the disc is better than drum brakes. Mine will pull down the whole rig and truck to stop on any steep hill with no braking from the truck. As will drum brakes too I'm sure. A phone call to Andy at Inland RV got everything I needed delivered out here in the west, you might want a closer source.
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