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Old 07-06-2004, 07:11 PM   #57
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Old 07-09-2004, 04:42 PM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stefrobrts
I don't know about the easy lube bearings, That's just what I've been told. I'll find out when I get it.
Stef,

Here is a diagrm of a system similar to easy lube. Just for reference.
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Old 07-09-2004, 04:55 PM   #59
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In an opinion that Easy Lube aficionados probably do not care to hear, uwe's diagram appears to show the grease from the inboard bearing being pushed up to the outboard bearing. So, if your inboard bearing starts to bite the dust, apparently one can ensure the demise of the outboard bearing by pumping the contaminated grease from bad bearing to good bearing.

So, backing up, I assume one is supposed to pump an incredible amount of grease on a regular basis to forestall problems. But all the grease will never be exchanged, and the grease seal has to tolerate this increased pressure and never fail.

Do I need to calm down, or is this a good approach to bearing care?
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Old 07-09-2004, 05:06 PM   #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcwilliams
In an opinion that Easy Lube aficionados probably do not care to hear, uwe's diagram appears to show the grease from the inboard bearing being pushed up to the outboard bearing. So, if your inboard bearing starts to bite the dust, apparently one can ensure the demise of the outboard bearing by pumping the contaminated grease from bad bearing to good bearing.

So, backing up, I assume one is supposed to pump an incredible amount of grease on a regular basis to forestall problems. But all the grease will never be exchanged, and the grease seal has to tolerate this increased pressure and never fail.

Do I need to calm down, or is this a good approach to bearing care?
I suppose that once the inboard bearing fails, it's all over anyways.
This system is not supposed to eliminate safety checks and bearing adjustments, but rather making it easier to grease the bearings during routine maintenance stops.
I don't know if this is good or bad, just thought of posting this when I found it on the net last night. It's being used in boat trailers a lot.
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Old 07-09-2004, 05:16 PM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uwe
...I don't know if this is good or bad, just thought of posting this when I found it on the net last night. It's being used in boat trailers a lot.
Uwe,

Thanks for the info. My somewhat scathing response to it was to the virtues of the product; It was not to the messenger that provided excellent insight to it's operation.

Thanks for posting the info.

Tom
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Old 07-09-2004, 05:20 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcwilliams
. . . . But all the grease will never be exchanged, and the grease seal has to tolerate this increased pressure and never fail. . . .

In defense of the EZ-Lube, they do require a double lip, spring loaded seal to counter the added pressure.
That said, I don't use them, for the reasons stated.
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Old 07-09-2004, 06:20 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uwe
I suppose that once the inboard bearing fails, it's all over anyways.
This system is not supposed to eliminate safety checks and bearing adjustments, but rather making it easier to grease the bearings during routine maintenance stops.
I don't know if this is good or bad, just thought of posting this when I found it on the net last night. It's being used in boat trailers a lot.
This system is NOT intended for use in a travel trailer, or other trailer that has electric brakes. The seals can fail, causing a lot of grease to enter the brake drum area, rendering the trailer brakes completely useless on that wheel. The idea of the "bearing buddy" is to force grease into the hub, and force out the water that may enter the area normally containing grease when the axle is submerged in water, as in loading/unloading a boat. Most EZ lube or Bearing Buddies have a spring-loaded center that maintains positive pressure on the grease in the hub, to help keep water out.
This is the voice of very recent experience talking. One of my co-workers Tuesday of this week thought this was a great idea, and put these things on his tandem-axle SOB. He then proceeded to pump the whole thing full of grease, and drove down the street about 3 miles and back. When he got back, grease was all up inside his wheelwells, and the backside of his tires. A copious amount was also inside the brake drums, with the end result of someone having to spend several hours cleaning grease from a lot of places that shouldn't have any.
My $1.98, which is .02 adjusted for inflation.
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Old 07-09-2004, 06:49 PM   #64
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If these are not intended for use on a travel trailer with electric brakes, then I assume the system on my new axel, custom built for my travel trailer with new electric brakes, must be somewhat different. I will find out next week. The trailer is at the shop right now.
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Old 07-09-2004, 09:37 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by argosy20
This system is NOT intended for use in a travel trailer, or other trailer that has electric brakes. The seals can fail, causing a lot of grease to enter the brake drum area, rendering the trailer brakes completely useless on that wheel. The idea of the "bearing buddy" is to force grease into the hub, and force out the water that may enter the area normally containing grease when the axle is submerged in water, as in loading/unloading a boat. Most EZ lube or Bearing Buddies have a spring-loaded center that maintains positive pressure on the grease in the hub, to help keep water out.
This is the voice of very recent experience talking. One of my co-workers Tuesday of this week thought this was a great idea, and put these things on his tandem-axle SOB. He then proceeded to pump the whole thing full of grease, and drove down the street about 3 miles and back. When he got back, grease was all up inside his wheelwells, and the backside of his tires. A copious amount was also inside the brake drums, with the end result of someone having to spend several hours cleaning grease from a lot of places that shouldn't have any.
My $1.98, which is .02 adjusted for inflation.
Terry

There is a difference between 'Bearing Buddies" and EZ Lube. The EZ Lube does not have a pressurized (spring loaded) center. In fact, the EZ Lube has a rubber cap on the hub that allows some expansion space.
And I have bearing buddies on my boat trailer and have never had grease all over the wheel wells.
Did your co-worker install the correct seals? Also, I've found Bearing Buddies need to be filled very carefully, and never to the point where the spring loaded center is pushed all the way out against the stop. If they were overfilled, I guess I can understand why they leaked.
All that aside, you're 100% correct that the Bearing buddies should only be used on boat trailers, not travel trailers.
EZ-Lube, on the other hand, have been used on travel trailers.
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Old 07-09-2004, 10:14 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markdoane
There is a difference between 'Bearing Buddies" and EZ Lube. The EZ Lube does not have a pressurized (spring loaded) center. In fact, the EZ Lube has a rubber cap on the hub that allows some expansion space.
And I have bearing buddies on my boat trailer and have never had grease all over the wheel wells.
Did your co-worker install the correct seals? Also, I've found Bearing Buddies need to be filled very carefully, and never to the point where the spring loaded center is pushed all the way out against the stop. If they were overfilled, I guess I can understand why they leaked.
All that aside, you're 100% correct that the Bearing buddies should only be used on boat trailers, not travel trailers.
EZ-Lube, on the other hand, have been used on travel trailers.
My, umm, co-worker left the original seals, and filled the things up, with a not- surprising result. The package these things came in said "E-Z Lube", and were spring loaded, like Bearing Buddies. I should probably have qualified my blanket statement, although I am still not convinced the non-spring loaded caps are a good idea. There is a great chance of overfilling them, and having a problem with overlubrication. Of course, too much of a good thing is not usually good.
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Old 07-09-2004, 10:36 PM   #67
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How about the oil filled hubs? I can see a good 90wt doing a great job keeping the bearings lubed and clean.
http://www.championtrailers.com/TURB...FILLEDHUBS.htm
This is a system I was referring to, although this particular one does not have brake drum hubs available, or so it seems. I seem to remember seeing this on a fifth wheel at a campground earlier this year.
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Old 07-09-2004, 10:38 PM   #68
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Originally Posted by argosy20
. . . . . although I am still not convinced the non-spring loaded caps are a good idea. There is a great chance of overfilling them, and having a problem with overlubrication. Of course, too much of a good thing is not usually good.
Terry
I agree completely.
Stephanie, From what I've heard, you need to follow the directions carefully when adding grease to the EZ-Lube, rotate the wheel slowly. Need to replace the seal anytime the hub is removed. Check Redneck Trailer Supply, I got double lip spring seals from them for about $1 each.
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Old 07-10-2004, 02:52 PM   #69
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Bearing Buddies .................

Follow the directions. The directions state not to overfill. (Or fill completely.)

Kinda like propane tanks. Too many people filled the tank completely. When the temp went up the tank vented. A venting propane tank is not a good thing. Now there is a law. So when people don't read or use some sense the rest of us get a law.

Please Uncle Sam, protect me from myself because I will not read the directions untill after I have completed the task.

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Old 07-11-2004, 01:40 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inland RV Center, In
Gunnyusmc.

Once "ANY" shipment is signed for, that person has the problem of resolving the issue.

Yet is seems that you want us to shoulder what we cannot or did not see.

No freight company is going to pay us, or Henschen, unless the bill of lading is "damage noted."

We are not the freight lines, therefore we cannot be responsible for what they damage. If it's grease caps or the like, that's a different story. Any and all damage, must be noted for "ANY" freight carrier, "IMMEDIATELY." Not later, but "NOW." If not, they will not pay.

Why do you feel it's Henschens fault or ours?

We both disagree.

Advice to anyone receiving a freight shipment of anykind, regardless from who.

Inspect it, "BEFORE" you sign for it. If it's damaged, and you don't note it, your on your own, because at that point, no one can help you.

Sorry, but that's the way all the freight lines work.

Also it's difficult to understand how Henschen or Inland RV can be held responsible, in any way, for someones lack of proper inspection. We can't see it, but the receiver can and does.

And if you really want to be on your own, buy a Dexter axle, and find out the problems, that just began.

Andy
Andy, you are kidding me!!!!!!!!!! Henschens is responsible for selecting the shipper. It should be insured. This is the typical attitude I am running into today on many products. There is no way a customer should have to disassemble a product such as we are talking about.

But. we thank you for warning us as to the business practices we should expect on this product. I just toured their factory and was favorably impress. However, that glow is fast wearing off.
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