Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-07-2006, 01:25 AM   #15
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
Hello tom ,
I think henschen is a good product,although definately a problem with the dry
bearing situation .The never lube should be a must sell for retrofit on any
axle brand ,probably will be ,as for henschen not being a player ,doubtful ,
inland Andy had alluded abit in another thread that they were going to be
in the game again ,put the neverlube hubs on them and it really doesn't
make alot of difference as long as quality comes out in the end ,dexter or
henschen either choice as long as its quality we get.

Scott
__________________

__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 12:07 PM   #16
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,067
Images: 13
FWIW
My Mark VIII has permanently sealed front wheel bearings. The car has 140,000 on it and I have never had the front hubs off the car. Given the opportunity, I would rather have those bearings that have to do the maintenence on them.

The load on my Mark is much lighter than my Overlander. However the use that my Mark sees is far beyond what my Overlander will ever see with my ownership.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________

__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 12:09 PM   #17
Retired Moderator
 
john hd's Avatar
 
1992 29' Excella
madison , Wisconsin
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,644
Images: 40
hey sealed spherical bearings are great!

my 88 chevy pickup made it to 275,000 before needing a replacement!

john
__________________
you call them ferrets, i call them weasels.
john hd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 12:11 PM   #18
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Quote:
Originally Posted by TOM CRUMP
Reason ? I just installed a set of new dexter axles equipped with NEV-R-Lube bearings, run 100k miles and replace them
what do those cost?
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 01:25 PM   #19
2 Rivet Member
 
TOM CRUMP's Avatar
 
1970 27' Overlander
Braxton , Mississippi
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 54
Images: 26
I had the axles replaced, new wheels the total bill includes labor was $1314
__________________
TOM CRUMP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 02:26 PM   #20
4 Rivet Member
 
empresley's Avatar
 
1984 34' International
1977 Argosy 24
Central , Georgia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 491
Images: 15
Bearing Insurance

I sell 4 different brands of trailers and my recommendation to customers is to keep a spare set of bearings & seal to take along on any out-of-town trips. No matter how frequent or well packed, bearings occasionally decide to fail. Another suggestion is to become familiar with the hub temp. (by touching) when traveling. A bit crude but an effective way of getting a early warning if a hub gets to hot to touch. This early warning is better than having a bearing weld itself to a spindle and ruin an axle. When towing I try to remember to touch hubs when we stop for fuel.
Dexter introduced the EZ-lube hub several years ago and some feel that it creates a false sense of security about lubricating bearings the old fashion way. Remove, clean, inspect and repack.
The new Never Lube will do a great job, but there will always be the factory defect or blemish that causes premature bearing failure.
From experience my best advice is: Get to know how warm your hubs are running and carry along an extra set of bearings.
Good luck on the road.
__________________
Travelers by aluminum roadships, loyalists to one species,
masters of convenience, herdsmen steeped in maintenance and restoration.


empresley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 09:01 PM   #21
3 Rivet Member
 
frozen chosen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by empresley
I sell 4 different brands of trailers and my recommendation to customers is to keep a spare set of bearings & seal to take along on any out-of-town trips. No matter how frequent or well packed, bearings occasionally decide to fail. Another suggestion is to become familiar with the hub temp. (by touching) when traveling.
What do you touch for this test? I am confronted with the aluninum wheel, then a metal hubcap. Even if I were to remove the hubcap (lools like a silver dixie cup), there would still be the dust cap. Do you have to somehow reach around behind the tire? Hah?
__________________
frozen chosen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 09:16 PM   #22
3 Rivet Member
 
2005 16' International CCD
Ogden , Utah
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 221
Infra Red Temp Sensor

I love gadgets, so I bought an infra red temp sensor. When towing, I stop every 100 to 150 miles and do a walk around check of tires, hitch, etc. It is super easy with the temp sensor to check tire, wheel, hub temps on both the truck and the trailer. If something shows a temp much different from the others, it's a signal to look further. I've never had a bearing problem, but I have found a tire with a nail this way - the tire pressures were OK at the start of the trip, but one of the tires was noticeably hotter during a check, and a closer look showed a nail, and a lower tire pressure.

Plus, it's useful for so many other things, like the temp of the A/C output, water heater output, etc. By checking rooutinely, I get a feel for what is normal, and can spot things that are changing before they fail outright.

Just a suggestion, fwiw.
__________________
RDM16CCD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-2006, 10:00 PM   #23
2 Rivet Member
 
Calvin's Avatar
 
1966 26' Overlander
Waskom , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 39
Hi Frederic.C01,

From your post I do not dismount the bearings, just the hat and I grease inside.thank you for your information)

The only place lubricant does any good is inn the bearing. Placing too much grease inside the bearing cap or in the middle of the hub between the bearings can actually interfere with the bearings ability to disipate heat. The bearings do need to be removed, cleaned, inspected and repacked as others have said.
Calvin
__________________
Calvin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2006, 01:40 AM   #24
Frank S
 
1973 27' Overlander
peoria , Illinois
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 316
Hi-- The Nev-R-Lube bearings on Dexter axles according to http://dexteraxle.com, are Timken double row tapered cartridge bearings, comprised of a double row cup, two identical cones, two seals, with preset adjustment and grease. The #10 Torflex axle uses a cartridge bearing with a 35mm bore (about 1-3/8"), while the #11 and #12 Torflex axles use a 42mm bore (about 1-5/8"). The #10 axle has 10 x 2-1/4" brakes, while the #11 and #12 have 12 x 2" brakes. All three axles have 6 on 5.50" bolt circle hub-drums, for zero offset wheels. I believe TOM CRUMP mentioned in another thread that his originial A/S zero offset wheels have a different bolt circle, and/or pilot hole, which required new wheels.--Frank S
__________________
Frank S is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2006, 12:20 PM   #25
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,067
Images: 13
Frozen Chosen, Pick something near the hub. Your hup cap would work. Just make it consistant for all wheels on all checks. What you are lookig for (or feeling for) is a noticable change in temp from one wheel/hub assy to the others.

The infra red thermometer (as suggested above) is a more accurate and a bit more expensive way to do the same.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2006, 12:22 PM   #26
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,067
Images: 13
Here is more on the thermometer.

http://www.omega.com/prodinfo/infraredthermometer.html

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2006, 02:32 PM   #27
4 Rivet Member
 
empresley's Avatar
 
1984 34' International
1977 Argosy 24
Central , Georgia
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 491
Images: 15
Feeling up your hubs

Quote:
Originally Posted by frozen chosen
What do you touch for this test? I am confronted with the aluninum wheel, then a metal hubcap. Even if I were to remove the hubcap (lools like a silver dixie cup), there would still be the dust cap. Do you have to somehow reach around behind the tire?

Wheel covers or even center caps do get in the way but this is not nearly as scientific as the infra-red temp. device (which is a great idea).
Since the wheel is bolted to the drum/hub, you can get a fairly good idea of normal vs. overheated by touching the wheel as close to the lug bolts as possible. Since repacking the bearings on our '84 tri-axle I have been using the large openings in the alum. wheel covers to reach in and put a finger on the wheel.
What I forgot to mention in the first post was that the temp. can feel hotter to the touch if you have just been heavy on the brakes before coming to a stop. Please keep in mind this is not an exact science but I promise, you can develop a "feel" for a normal heat range. I have put my hand on hubs that were hot enough to burn vs. warm after several hours of continuous driving.
__________________
Travelers by aluminum roadships, loyalists to one species,
masters of convenience, herdsmen steeped in maintenance and restoration.


empresley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2006, 02:00 AM   #28
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
Hello Frank S,

Thats is very interesting ,tapered timkens in a sealed bearing design .
As I had posted earlier on this thread ,the auto end of it uses the ball
bearing setup ,double rows .I recall the early toyota tercels used taper rollers
and a steel spacer for preload .They went away from that to the standard
style that most vehicals use today .I cannot think of any vehical I can remember having sealed timkens ,ecept the tercel .Anyway ,I hope that
that setup will give trouble free service.Look forward to how well those
neverlube hubs will last .It would be nice not to have to worry about them .
I would ,now and then ,check them for rotational noise and smoothness ,
preload ,or play in the hub ,just to keep tabs on this new style of hub.


Scott
__________________

__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wheel bearings FlyingW Axles 3 07-01-2006 06:36 PM
Cheap looking bearings from Romania qqq Axles 5 07-07-2003 06:41 AM
repacking the Wheel Bearings Chuck Axles 26 04-27-2003 09:59 PM
Replace Wheel Bearings? Pick Axles 6 02-28-2003 07:30 PM
bearings Dwight Axles 0 01-24-2003 10:58 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.