Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-20-2014, 03:59 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
truckasaurus's Avatar

 
1960 33' Custom
Saskatoon , Saskatchewan
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,182
Images: 25
Axles, Angles & Approach

I've been giving more thought to which axles and what frame I'll go with on the 33'er and I got a bit sidetracked thinking about approach angles. I kind of assumed that longer trailers had their chassis higher off the ground to maintain a decent approach angle, but now I'm not sure.

I did a napkin sketch of a 4" chassis with an additional 4" channel below it like my trailer, added a 45 degree Axis axle ( 4000 lbs style) and 16" tires (225-75 16's) and it looked like at maximum compression the tire would be less than 4" above the top of the chassis. I kind of wanted to see if the current trailers had floors at the same heights across the range of sizes and how they compared to vintage floor heights if possible.

One the one hand I'd like a low and sleek racing trailer perfect for the slalom and on the other I don't want to end up beached like a whale at a Provincial camp site, a happy medium would be doable. The question is how high is too high, I mean 4" wheel wells are dangerously close to a flat deck scenario which would be very nice for the interior layout :-)
__________________

__________________
1960 Sovereign 33' Pacific Railroad Custom
truckasaurus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2014, 05:28 PM   #2
Rivet Master
Airstream Dealer
 
Inland RV Center, In's Avatar
 
Corona , California
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 16,499
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by truckasaurus View Post
I've been giving more thought to which axles and what frame I'll go with on the 33'er and I got a bit sidetracked thinking about approach angles. I kind of assumed that longer trailers had their chassis higher off the ground to maintain a decent approach angle, but now I'm not sure.

I did a napkin sketch of a 4" chassis with an additional 4" channel below it like my trailer, added a 45 degree Axis axle ( 4000 lbs style) and 16" tires (225-75 16's) and it looked like at maximum compression the tire would be less than 4" above the top of the chassis. I kind of wanted to see if the current trailers had floors at the same heights across the range of sizes and how they compared to vintage floor heights if possible.

One the one hand I'd like a low and sleek racing trailer perfect for the slalom and on the other I don't want to end up beached like a whale at a Provincial camp site, a happy medium would be doable. The question is how high is too high, I mean 4" wheel wells are dangerously close to a flat deck scenario which would be very nice for the interior layout :-)
I would suggest that you not have a starting angle greater then 35 degrees.

A 45 degree starting angle, will punish the trailer.

Andy
__________________

__________________
Inland RV Center, In is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2014, 07:02 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
truckasaurus's Avatar

 
1960 33' Custom
Saskatoon , Saskatchewan
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,182
Images: 25
Thanks Andy.
__________________
1960 Sovereign 33' Pacific Railroad Custom
truckasaurus is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I need new wheels if I'm getting new axles? awetsch General Repair Forum 31 03-17-2014 02:42 PM
Towing with Bad Axles CF Av8or Axles 15 02-11-2012 06:19 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.