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Old 12-03-2013, 11:02 AM   #15
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1959 24' Tradewind
collingwood , Ontario
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Thanks guys.
Does the pic give you any indication of needing replacement? Can you by glance know if it would be a no-brainer to replace, or if seemingly solid just be replaced using the precautionary principle?
I am very new to trailers and have little mechanic experience.
cheers.
Muskie
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Old 12-04-2013, 12:08 PM   #16
1972 Travelux Princess 25
 
Cobourg , Ontario
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Originally Posted by Muskie View Post
Thanks guys.
Does the pic give you any indication of needing replacement? Can you by glance know if it would be a no-brainer to replace, or if seemingly solid just be replaced using the precautionary principle?
I am very new to trailers and have little mechanic experience.
cheers.
Muskie
The axle itself has no moving parts and never wears out. It could be bent in an accident.

The wear parts are the brakes, the bearings and the springs.

You can visually inspect the axle to see if it is bent or the wheels are cockeyed.

Inspect the springs for broken leaves. They should have a slight curve to them. If they are not broken, bent, or flattened out they are ok. Although, they will work smoother if you take them apart, clean out the rust and put some grease in between.

You have to remove the brake drum to inspect the brakes. This is best done by taking off the wheel, drum and hub as an assembly. Clean the bearings and inspect for wear, rust or galling. If everything is smooth and shiny they can be packed with fresh grease and reused. You should put in a new grease seal when you repack the bearings. New bearings and seals can be bought from Peterborough Bearing or any bearing supply place. The hub and bearing is basically the same as the front wheel on a rear drive car or pickup truck. Any auto mechanic should be familiar with them.

Drum brakes are the same as used on cars except they are electrically actuated. Inspect shoes for wear, or for lining separating from the shoe. The parts, springs etc should be free to move and not too rusty. Brake drums can get worn and rutted, if the shoes are good slight scoring is nothing to worry about but if you replace the shoes the drums should be turned if they are not smooth.

There is an electromagnet on a lever. It wears against a flat plate in the drum. If the magnet is worn down too far it must be replaced. Inspect the wire for wear, fraying, or cracking insulation. If you apply 12volts to the brakes they should lock up and skid the tires. For proper use you need a brake controller in your tow vehicle.

It may be possible to clean, inspect and lube the brakes and bearings. If they are in good shape go ahead and use them. But if the brakes and bearings are worn out it is better and cheaper to buy a whole new brake assembly, about $80.

Any good auto mechanic can service inspect and repair your brakes and bearings.
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Old 12-05-2013, 02:07 PM   #17
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1959 24' Tradewind
collingwood , Ontario
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Originally Posted by Ganaraska View Post
The axle itself has no moving parts and never wears out. It could be bent in an accident.

The wear parts are the brakes, the bearings and the springs.

You can visually inspect the axle to see if it is bent or the wheels are cockeyed.

Inspect the springs for broken leaves. They should have a slight curve to them. If they are not broken, bent, or flattened out they are ok. Although, they will work smoother if you take them apart, clean out the rust and put some grease in between.

You have to remove the brake drum to inspect the brakes. This is best done by taking off the wheel, drum and hub as an assembly. Clean the bearings and inspect for wear, rust or galling. If everything is smooth and shiny they can be packed with fresh grease and reused. You should put in a new grease seal when you repack the bearings. New bearings and seals can be bought from Peterborough Bearing or any bearing supply place. The hub and bearing is basically the same as the front wheel on a rear drive car or pickup truck. Any auto mechanic should be familiar with them.

Drum brakes are the same as used on cars except they are electrically actuated. Inspect shoes for wear, or for lining separating from the shoe. The parts, springs etc should be free to move and not too rusty. Brake drums can get worn and rutted, if the shoes are good slight scoring is nothing to worry about but if you replace the shoes the drums should be turned if they are not smooth.

There is an electromagnet on a lever. It wears against a flat plate in the drum. If the magnet is worn down too far it must be replaced. Inspect the wire for wear, fraying, or cracking insulation. If you apply 12volts to the brakes they should lock up and skid the tires. For proper use you need a brake controller in your tow vehicle.

It may be possible to clean, inspect and lube the brakes and bearings. If they are in good shape go ahead and use them. But if the brakes and bearings are worn out it is better and cheaper to buy a whole new brake assembly, about $80.

Any good auto mechanic can service inspect and repair your brakes and bearings.
Hey thanks for your time explaining that. I guess I really just need to take it to a mechanic and let him graze over the important bits and give me an idea of what I am up against.
Will keep you posted. Thanks again.
-m
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Old 12-05-2013, 05:32 PM   #18
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Frank,

I like how you think! While redoing the 56 FK, went back with the original springs, shackle bolts, etc... style system. I figured if the original ones lasted from 56 until now (and still working fine), a new set should last until I'm no longer able to drive.

Enjoy,
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Old 12-06-2013, 11:14 AM   #19
1972 Travelux Princess 25
 
Cobourg , Ontario
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O ya forgot to mention the tires. Trailer tires are only good for 5 years before they lose their strength and start cracking. There is a code date stamped on the sidewall. More than 5 years old should be replaced.

You have to use your common sense here. If you are moving the trailer a couple of miles at no more than 30 MPH you can be a little chancy. For a trailer that is used on the hiway regularly, don't take chances. A blown tire can do serious damage to your trailer and possibly cause an accident.

Some people prefer light truck tires over trailer tires.
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