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Old 05-24-2013, 08:56 AM   #1
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2000 31' Excella
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Axle weight rating

I have a 2000 31 ft Excella. I would like replace brake assemblies with either 6000lb or 7000lb rated Dexter Nev-R-Adjust brake assemblies. Which is recommended, based on axel weight ratings for this trailer(which I havn't been able to determine)?
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Old 05-24-2013, 09:09 AM   #2
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Check the metal plate where the vin # is located. You are looking for the GAWR (gross axle weight rating, probably between 4500 and 5000 lbs). This will be the weight rating for the axle. The trailer will have 2" x 12" brakes unless it has been upgraded to disk brakes.
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Old 05-24-2013, 09:49 AM   #3
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That plate on the front driver side corner should give you the weight rating of the original axles. If it is not there, this is a link to Airstream's specification for your trailer. http://www.airstream.com/files/library/72364822d4f9475a.pdf

This spec says the GVWR is 8,300 lbs. That is 7150 dry weight plus 1150 additional allowed weight. The factory tongue weight is 690 lbs. (8300-690= 7,610 lbs on two axles) (7,610/2=3,805 lbs on each Axel) So theoretically you could get by with two 4,000 axles.

If it were my trailer I would use axles with an additional 500 lb rating higher than the original axles.
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Old 05-24-2013, 09:53 AM   #4
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Just find a Dexter dealer like Redneck Trailers and order he 2X12" brake assemblies with the self adjusting brake option
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Old 05-24-2013, 10:10 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by orloffgray View Post
I have a 2000 31 ft Excella. I would like replace brake assemblies with either 6000lb or 7000lb rated Dexter Nev-R-Adjust brake assemblies. Which is recommended, based on axel weight ratings for this trailer(which I havn't been able to determine)?
We only use the 6000 pound rated self adjusting electric brake backing plates.

I would suggest that you TOTALLY disregard the 7000 pound backing plates.

Additionally, the 7000 pounders are about 25 percent more in cost.

Stocking dealers do not carry parts for the 7000# either, but do for the 6000# brakes.

Andy
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:42 AM   #6
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Andy,

Would you please educate me. I would take your advice on the correct axle, no question!

When you recommend replacement axles I have notice you sometimes advise to increase the load capacity. Would you explain why? And, how much additional capacity above the original axles would you advise?

I understand that increased load capacity on the axles is a good thing, but there is a point when the trailer structure will not support additional load the axles will support. I looked at your website and did not find the answer in your articles.

Thanks!
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Old 05-24-2013, 12:08 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by A W Warn View Post
Andy,

Would you please educate me. I would take your advice on the correct axle, no question!

When you recommend replacement axles I have notice you sometimes advise to increase the load capacity. Would you explain why? And, how much additional capacity above the original axles would you advise?

I understand that increased load capacity on the axles is a good thing, but there is a point when the trailer structure will not support additional load the axles will support. I looked at your website and did not find the answer in your articles.

Thanks!
Increasing the rating of torsion axles for Airstream and Argosy trailers has a number of reasons.

In time, the typical ratings show that they were inadequate.

People today haul more stuff.

There is a reasonable limit, which is a function of the chassis design.

Usually, but not always, and increase of 15 percent or so, is ok.

Running "E" tires at 80 PSI, is asking for trouble, for the entire trailer.

The soft ride demanded by the Airstream design, should be accepted and not criticized or tossed to the curb, as some do, unfortunately. That only leads to very expensive repairs, down the road. History says so.

Andy
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Old 05-31-2013, 10:59 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by Inland RV Center, In View Post
Increasing the rating of torsion axles for Airstream and Argosy trailers has a number of reasons.

In time, the typical ratings show that they were inadequate.

People today haul more stuff.

There is a reasonable limit, which is a function of the chassis design.

Usually, but not always, and increase of 15 percent or so, is ok.

Running "E" tires at 80 PSI, is asking for trouble, for the entire trailer.

The soft ride demanded by the Airstream design, should be accepted and not criticized or tossed to the curb, as some do, unfortunately. That only leads to very expensive repairs, down the road. History says so.

Andy
This is a subject with many variables. I have a 72 Argosy 20', GAWR for the axle is tagged at 4500lb. Actual wet weight of the trailer is 3460lbs with a 620 lb tongue weight. Weight on the axles is therefore 2840lbs. In reality I tow without any water in the 30 gal tank up front, so my tongue weight is approximately 380 lbs.

So Andy, my question is this, when I switch out axles, which I'm getting ready to do, should I stick with the 4500lb rated one, or bump up to 5000lb? I've had one person try to convince me to drop to a 4000 lb axle and one try to convince me to go to a 5000lb. I want a safe ride, so I'm thinking of sticking with 4500lb as originally installed at the factory 40+ years ago, but would like your opinion.

Thank you
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Old 05-31-2013, 11:14 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by DryFly View Post
This is a subject with many variables. I have a 72 Argosy 20', GAWR for the axle is tagged at 4500lb. Actual wet weight of the trailer is 3460lbs with a 620 lb tongue weight. Weight on the axles is therefore 2840lbs. In reality I tow without any water in the 30 gal tank up front, so my tongue weight is approximately 380 lbs.

So Andy, my question is this, when I switch out axles, which I'm getting ready to do, should I stick with the 4500lb rated one, or bump up to 5000lb? I've had one person try to convince me to drop to a 4000 lb axle and one try to convince me to go to a 5000lb. I want a safe ride, so I'm thinking of sticking with 4500lb as originally installed at the factory 40+ years ago, but would like your opinion.

Thank you
The weight ratings, in time, increase "IF" time has proven that the original rating was inadequate.

The 1977 Argosy 20 foot trailer still used the 4500 pound rating.

Depending on the pay load that you carry, you can increase to 5000 pounds, if you wish, but certainly not any lower than the original.

Opinions are just that. An opinion. Facts are just that too. FACTS. Gutting the trailer, would allow for a smaller weightb rating.

Also, traveling with "NO" water is a very bad idea.

First of all, you won't increase any fuel economy by doing so.

Secondly, as a proven fact, the trailer's center of gravity lowers when the water is full, meaning that it tows "better".

Plus, if you blow a radiator hose, out in the boonies, guess where you can get some water???

Traveling with full water, adds not only to better handling, but also to added security, in case of ??? Who knows!!

Andy
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Old 05-31-2013, 02:36 PM   #10
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Andy, my trailer nameplate (and AS specs) say my trailer has two 3000# axles and is rated for a gross weight of 6300#. The name plate on the axles say they are rated form 3200#. Is this unusual? I assume these are the original axles since it is a 2002 trailer. Does this also mean that the gross weight rating on my AS can be increased by 400# because of the higher rated axles?
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Old 05-31-2013, 02:52 PM   #11
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Andy, my trailer nameplate (and AS specs) say my trailer has two 3000# axles and is rated for a gross weight of 6300#. The name plate on the axles say they are rated form 3200#. Is this unusual? I assume these are the original axles since it is a 2002 trailer. Does this also mean that the gross weight rating on my AS can be increased by 400# because of the higher rated axles?
Yes.

But, torsion axles, should not be loaded at 100 percent.

Ball park, 90 percent or so, of the axle rating, is enough load. Straining the axle to 100 percent of it load rating, could have long term negative effects.

But, keep in mind, as an example, a 6000 pound trailer with an 800 pound tongue weight, only imposes 5200 pounds of weight on the axles, when hooked up for towing, using a load equalizing hitch.

Andy
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