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Old 08-13-2007, 11:22 PM   #43
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At the request of another forum member, (that and I upgraded to a golden rivet so I have more upload room) here are the pdf files that show the part #'s/option # for the shock mount bracket on Dexter axles.
E_1501 is for the #10 axle
E_1492, and E_1493 are different options for a #11 axle.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf E_1501.pdf (15.7 KB, 280 views)
File Type: pdf E_1492.pdf (14.2 KB, 217 views)
File Type: pdf E_1493.pdf (15.1 KB, 187 views)
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Old 08-14-2007, 08:56 AM   #44
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Oh, I just sent a pm to you. THANK YOU!
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Old 08-14-2007, 09:57 AM   #45
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Great Pumpkin:

Thank you for posting the Dexter shock mount engineering drawings. Are they for only 1967 and later model year Airstream trailers with the near horizontally mounted shock absorbers? Or are they for only the 1961-1966 model year Airstream trailers with the vertical mounted shock absorbers? Please clarify which trailers the drawings apply to. Thanks!
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Old 08-14-2007, 12:23 PM   #46
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Excellent

Great information Mr. Pumpkin - thanks for sharing!

Regards,
Henry
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Old 08-14-2007, 11:35 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 47WeeWind
Great Pumpkin:

Thank you for posting the Dexter shock mount engineering drawings. Are they for only 1967 and later model year Airstream trailers with the near horizontally mounted shock absorbers? Or are they for only the 1961-1966 model year Airstream trailers with the vertical mounted shock absorbers? Please clarify which trailers the drawings apply to. Thanks!
Fred -

At this point I'm not sure of the answer to your question. The pdf's came from a Dexter engineer. I strongly suspect they apply to '67 and later horizontally mounted shocks. I ordered the option anyways and will see how/if it works on my '64 when they come in. Worse case I'll have to cut them off - I thought it was worth a chance. I was willing to be the test so we all can find out for sure.
As you can see from the drawing, it appears the shock mount is mid torsion arm, vs OEM on mine was on the end of the torsion arm. I think it will work, but my concern is it may be in the way of the bracket that stops the torsion arm from travelling to far/bottoming out.
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Old 08-15-2007, 06:17 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatPumpkin
As you can see from the drawing, it appears the shock mount is mid torsion arm, vs OEM on mine was on the end of the torsion arm. I think it will work, but my concern is it may be in the way of the bracket that stops the torsion arm from travelling to far/bottoming out.
I think that is the configuration for the pre-1967 axles. OEM was on the pivot end of the arm, and it sounds like the new mount has been located so you can re-use the mount that is welded to your frame.
Had it been for the 1967 and up trailers, the mount would still be on the pivot end of the axle, because the frame mount is in a location that would not reach the mid-arm mount.
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Old 08-15-2007, 08:09 AM   #49
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How about this ... ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreatPumpkin
Fred - At this point I'm not sure of the answer to your question. The pdf's came from a Dexter engineer. I strongly suspect they apply to '67 and later horizontally mounted shocks. I ordered the option anyways and will see how/if it works on my '64 when they come in. Worse case I'll have to cut them off - I thought it was worth a chance. I was willing to be the test so we all can find out for sure.

As you can see from the drawing, it appears the shock mount is mid torsion arm, vs OEM on mine was on the end of the torsion arm. I think it will work, but my concern is it may be in the way of the bracket that stops the torsion arm from travelling to far/bottoming out.
GreatPumpkin:

I think you are correct in suspecting these Dexter Torflex shock absorber lower mounting brackets are very close to the 1967 and later Henschen Dura-Torque axle shock mount brackets because they locate the lower shock mount near the upper pivot end of the torsion arm and not at the hub end of the torsion arm. Below are 2 Airstream factory photos of the 1961-66 [left] and the 1967+ [right] Dura-Torque axles that show where the lower shock mounting brackets are located. The Dexter engineering drawings locate their shock brackets at or very close to the Henschen 1967+ pivot end position.

Now I'm no engineer, but I wonder if the existing Dexter shock mounting brackets were swapped side-to-side on the Torflex axle (as is done with the Dexter axle mounting brackets) and reversed so they pointed towards the lower hub end of the torsion arm instead of towards the higher pivot end of the torsion arm if they would be close enough to the original position of the 1961-66 Henschen Dura-Torque shock mount brackets that a fella couldn't then find a new or different shock absorber to fit into that "new" vertical position? I would think someone makes a shock absorber that would work for that application.

Dexter has built Torflex axles with swapped and reversed axle mounting brackets. It would seem no big deal to spec a Torflex axle with Dexter's exisiting shock mounting brackets swapped and reversed (but welded to the torsion arm at the same location as shown in the engineering drawings). Doing so should result in a shock mounting bracket that is close to the position of the 1961-66 Henschen Dura-Torque lower shock mounting bracket. One might have to find a slightly shorter shock asbsorber to fit between the original Henschen 61-66 upper and the new Dexter lower shock absorber mounting brackets, but I imagine such a shock absorber could be found that would work well for this purpose.

One benefit of my suggestion is that Dexter would be using its OEM parts currently on hand for this modification and would not have to design a new shock absorber mounting bracket for 1961-66 Airstreams. One would have to check clearance measurements and determine whether a shock absorber could be mounted after such a so-spec'd Dexter axle is installed on the trailer (think about the orientation of the mounting stud, etc.). I'll leave those tasks to the more detailed-oriented guys. I'm only the idea man, not the make-it-work man.

Anyway, I toss out this idea for people to think about and brainstorm from or with. Now, don't rush for your tape measures all at one ...
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Name:	1967+ Dura-Torque.jpg
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ID:	43294  

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Old 08-15-2007, 08:46 AM   #50
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47WeeWind,

I'm kind of off topic here, but an observation about your pictures has incited a question that has been bugging me for some time now.

Depending on how long it takes you to get your TT back together (my project is not 2.5 years old), you may be sitting on those new axles for a long time, which is not good for the rubber. I know it's easier to replace now, but why not wait until everything else is done?
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Old 08-15-2007, 08:57 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spiffy Gem
47WeeWind, I'm kind of off topic here, but an observation about your pictures has incited a question that has been bugging me for some time now. Depending on how long it takes you to get your TT back together (my project is not 2.5 years old), you may be sitting on those new axles for a long time, which is not good for the rubber. I know it's easier to replace now, but why not wait until everything else is done?
Hi Spiffy Gem:

Those are factory photos from the 1966 and 1967 Airstream catalogs. I only wish my frame looked as good as either one of those. My 1964 Airstream 19' Globe Trotter is all together and fully functional, and I have just ordered a new Dexter Torflex axle that will be installed in the next few weeks.
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Old 08-15-2007, 11:02 AM   #52
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I've always wondered why the change from verticle to horizontal shocks came to be.. verticle seemed more logical in my mind UNTIL Fred posted those pics. The horizontal setup is much more compact and builder friendly. No extra shock tower to make.

Thanks Fred. I learn something everyday around here.
Marc
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Old 08-15-2007, 11:56 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 47WeeWind
Hi Spiffy Gem:

My 1964 Airstream 19' Globe Trotter is all together and fully functional, and I have just ordered a new Dexter Torflex axle that will be installed in the next few weeks.
just curious..
what weight rating is your new axle?
i got a 4000 lb dexter axle for my 63 19' globetrotter.
the installers welded it on... i may have it bolted as well.
i have noticed alot of cargo shifting.. though we have been on some very bumpy and winding roads..
on the freeway it is great, very smooth.
my TT also rides a bit higher than others i have seen..
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Old 08-15-2007, 12:06 PM   #54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 47WeeWind
Great Pumpkin:

Thank you for posting the Dexter shock mount engineering drawings. Are they for only 1967 and later model year Airstream trailers with the near horizontally mounted shock absorbers? Or are they for only the 1961-1966 model year Airstream trailers with the vertical mounted shock absorbers? Please clarify which trailers the drawings apply to. Thanks!
There is a "HUGE" variation in the location of the shock brackets from 1968 and older torsion axles, not only from the California built trailers, but also the Ohio built trailers.

No one seems to have a "why" answer, other than "that's the way it is."

To be on the safe side, it's better to install the shock brackets for those years, in the field, so that you can set them to whatever your trailer requires.

Andy
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Old 08-15-2007, 04:42 PM   #55
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There is a "HUGE" variation in the location of the shock brackets from 1968 and older torsion axles, not only from the California built trailers, but also the Ohio built trailers. No one seems to have a "why" answer, other than "that's the way it is." Andy
Hi Andy:

If your "why" addresses the number of variations, I can't answer that either. But if it was asking why the shock absorbers were mounted vertically from 1961 to 1966, its my understanding that shock absorbers work best when perpendicular to the movement they damper. In my mind, the 1961-66 shocks appear more effectve at dampening than the 1967+ ones due solely to mounting position. But the 1967+ near horizontal position provides slightly greater interior floor space and may allow for slightly narrower wheel well housings, so I imagine the engineers were overruled by the designers in 1967.
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Old 08-15-2007, 05:45 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 47WeeWind
Hi Andy:

If your "why" addresses the number of variations, I can't answer that either. But if it was asking why the shock absorbers were mounted vertically from 1961 to 1966, its my understanding that shock absorbers work best when perpendicular to the movement they damper. In my mind, the 1961-66 shocks appear more effectve at dampening than the 1967+ ones due solely to mounting position. But the 1967+ near horizontal position provides slightly greater interior floor space and may allow for slightly narrower wheel well housings, so I imagine the engineers were overruled by the designers in 1967.
According to Airstream the vertical versus the horizontal shock performance is identical.

The only difference is the position is must be in to function correctly.

I believe as you do, that the change to horizontal was dictated by space available.

Horizontal shocks useage has reduced the size of the wheel wells.

Andy
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