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Old 05-16-2006, 10:27 AM   #29
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- If it is cool outside, use the furnace! Warmer air holds more moisture without condensation. The furnace's heat exchanger prevents any combustion byproducts from entering the coach - so you will not pick up moisture from the LP gas. You should still leave a window cracked open to vent humid warm air for drier cool air... until someone comes up with a small ventilator with an air-to-air heat exchanger for RV's.

- If it is warm outside, use the air conditioning. Moist air passing over cold A/C coils will condense the water which runs overboard through a drain tube.

- If it's too cool for the A/C and too warm for the furnace... open windows and use your fantastic fan. But, if the cool evening air is humid and produces condensation, it will get wet inside too. You could bring a small electric dehumidifier and run the drain tube outside.

- The packages of dessicant mentioned earlier may help during periods of storage, but I don't think they can handle the volume of water produced in an occupied trailer.
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Old 05-18-2006, 03:26 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2airishuman
this issue is particularly hard to deal with in mild temps...50-60s because it's just a little too cool to open all the windows...but not cold enough for full furnace use... and not hot enough for full a/c use, or a fully drying sun in the daytime....
I have actually run the air conditioner and the furnace at the same time to dry things out when it is too hot/cold for either one alone. It works.
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Old 05-18-2006, 04:00 PM   #31
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Hello Dan... sorry to disagree with you BUT it does help during periods of occupation by people .. we have used it both for storage and for use and it does make a great difference.. Annie
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Old 05-18-2006, 07:43 PM   #32
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Depends

Has anyone suggested a 110v dehumidifier?
Cost a bit, but will surely solve your wetness problem while you're plugged into a campground.



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Old 05-18-2006, 10:15 PM   #33
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yeap that could work if

[quote=artlink]Has anyone suggested a 110v dehumidifier?
Cost a bit, but will surely solve your wetness problem while you're plugged into a campground.

We were plugged up but we're not just battiers and fan and LP
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Old 05-19-2006, 10:16 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Canoe stream
Do you use the AirDryr for storage? It appears to be a heater only and would not remove humidity.
We need to be clear about what we mean by "humidity". For those who have not studied elementary physics, here is my basic understanding of the matter:

1. When physicists and weather forecasters describe the amount of water vapour in the air, they are usually talking about "relative humidity." This is the percentage of water vapour which is in the specimen of air, compared to the maximum that the air could hold, AT THAT TEMPERATURE. So, if the air inside your Airstream contains one pint of water (dispersed as a vapour), but that if you leave a few wet towels about, it could ultimately hold a maximum of two pints, then the "relative humidity" of the air is 50%. It is high "relative humidity" that makes us feel uncomfortable, rather than the AMOUNT of water vapour in the air. For example, at high "relative humidity", sweat will not evaporate off our skin.

2. The warmer the air, the more water vapour it is capable of holding, as described by dmac, above. Thus, if air in a closed container, like an Airstream with its windows shut, is heated, then it is capable of holding more water vapour. From 1, above it follows that merely by warming the air, the relative humidity goes down. (Because the water vapour stays the same amount, but the capacity for holding water vapour has increased.) That's how a mere heater can reduce "relative humidity", without reducing the water content of the air.

3. Conversely, if the air is cooled, the "relative humidity" is increased. Ultimately, if the air is cooled sufficiently, the "relative humidity" reaches 100%, and the air is holding the maximum possible water vapour at that temperature. This is called the "Dew Point". If the temperature goes lower, water falls out of the air as "condensation", on the coolest surfaces around.

4. "Relative humidity" is measured by devices called hygrometers. I set the air conditioning for my indoor swimming pool at about 65% relative humidity, on my consultant's recommendation for a level that humans enjoy. The simplest hygrometer is the "wet and dry bulb" hygrometer, and you can make one at home. Take two identical glass tube type room thermometers. Wrap a piece of absorbent cotton round one bulb, and dip the rest of the cotton in a saucer of water. The water will wick up the cotton, and evaporate if the relative humidity is less than 100%. To evaporate, the water takes heat from its surroundings, and cools the bulb. The greater the difference in temperature between the wet and dry bulbs, the lower the "relative humidity." This is calculated by a simple formula.

5. How does this load of waffle affect our damp friends? Well, understanding what is happening is part way to solving any problem. The advice given in the previous posts is excellent, but remember that heat is your friend in lowering "relative humidity". Allow an air flow from a low intake to a high outlet, but experiment by keeping the temperature up to a comfortable level with an electric fan heater with an adjustable thermostat.( Mine was about $12 from Wal-Mart). On hot nights we have taken the opposite route, shut all the windows, and run the A/C for a couple of hours to dry the air (ear plugs!), and then just cracked the bathroom vent open to allow a little circulation. We also use fitted covers outside some of the large windows to reduce condensation caused by the poor insulating value of glass.( The temperature of the air close to the glass easily drops below the dew point of the air inside the trailer, and so condensation forms.) These are canvas covers with camping mat foam liners, fitted to the outside window surrounds with press studs. We use the drying crystals when the trailer is stored, with the containers sitting over the sink and shower outlets, with a few drops of cooking oil in each trap to stop condensation of the water in the traps.
Nick.
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Old 05-19-2006, 11:13 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by Angel73
Can someone pls tell me How to stop this problem.Every morning when we where camping in the A/S we all wake up damp to the point we had to take thing out to dry for the rest of the day.I had forgot about the problem until i was telling the kids we could go camping in the tent for this summer.While the A/S was getting redone.
Then they said whats the differences mom we still get up wet every morning..So i was hoping someone could tell me ,How to stop or prevent this problem


Weather it raining or not we still wake up damp.I even tryed closing the windows and vent one night.Didn't help much..
This is what I use on my boat, over 10 years old and survived Katrina and still works great. I have changed the rechargeable battery now and again. Keeps the boat nice and dry, has 2 blades, can move air in either direction. Looks good.

http://www.marinco.com/scpt/ProdPage...20Recreational
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Old 05-19-2006, 01:21 PM   #36
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Damp-Rid is made of anhydrous Calcium Chloride. From Wikipedia:
"Because it is strongly hygroscopic, it can be used to dry air as well as other gases and organic liquids. In the process, it is converted to a brine as it absorbs the water or water vapor from the substance to be dried:
CaCl2 + 2 H2O → CaCl2·2H2O

The dissolving process is highly exothermic and rapidly produces temperatures of around 60°C (140°F). This can result in chemical burns if humans or animals eat dry calcium chloride pellets."

In this process each calcium chloride molecule entraps 2 water molecules. From High School chemistry...
  • 1 mole of CaCl2 captures 2 moles of water, meaning 111.03 gm of CaCl2 captures 36.04 gm of water
  • a 4 lb container of CaCl2 captures 1.28 lb of water, or about .15 gallons of water
A person exhales and perspires about 1 qt of water per day, plus moisture from showers, cooking, washing dishes, etc.

I would be surprised if Damp-Rid makes a significant difference in an occupied trailer.
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Old 05-19-2006, 04:17 PM   #37
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Dan, It does make a big difference, we use it in our Argosy and also in our 30ft fifth wheel. We don't have any moisture in the windows or anyplace else, we use two packs near the front and one in back. Marvin
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Old 05-19-2006, 10:31 PM   #38
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We have a 60 tradewind ,we use it alot ,never have we had this type of problem .how many people have ?,I wonder with their airstreams ,It sounds like these poor souls are taking a shower while they sleep.Great information on the humidity info nickcrowhurst by the way.I can only remember getting wet camping in a tiny backpack tent .

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Old 05-19-2006, 11:07 PM   #39
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Hummm

Am not sure, but it sounds like its a on going problem for alot of us tho.....am going to get the damp-rid tomorrow and anything else i can find or people reccomend...that may help.....We tryed everything before i decided to ask here.And with new floor and soon new paint ..i don't want to take anymore chances with the moister problem.Plus we're tired of waking up wet.....If i wanted to be wet i would of stayed in our three room tent .....lol
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Old 05-19-2006, 11:40 PM   #40
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hi angel73

i gotta tell ya this is one of those threads that gives me conflicting thoughts....

-otoh i'd like it to go away ......because it is so (insert your own adjective)

-otoh i'm drawn to it and like others would like to help solve this one little problem for ya....realizing there may be much larger problems

nick has correctly explained relative humidity and dew points....

what you need to remember is.....
1. hot air holds more water than cold,
2. your family inside the trailer makes hot air,
3. the trailer skin in cold....relative to the hot air...
4. warm moist air will deposit water on the cooler skin...
5. so you need to warm the trailer skin and circulate out the moist air...


my belief is that you need to use the central heating......

i've read that you have fears about the propane systems.....

but most of us use the central heating and the propane fridge without blowing up! and we cook on the stoves too!

if your hubbie is fixn' stuff have him make sure these things all work!!

without using the central heat,
your trailer shell becomes like most other primative objects at ground temp....i
t really becomes a big 'ole beer can.

then with people inside you create extra wet air
that is just a little warmer than the metal skin....

so the moist air in contact with the cool skin
causes the water to come out on the structure....
JUST LIKE A BEER CAN only on the inside.....

so the central heating will warm up the trailer structure in a way that small electric space heaters can't....unless you are using 50 of'em.....

so once the trailer walls/frame/tanks/insides are warmer,
moisture will be less likely to condense on the walls
while you guys are inside......

ever seen a warm kettle sweat?
no of course not....so warm up the kettle!

you will still need to open a window and vents for circulation and to vent out the gallon of water you guys are making inside....

don't waste precious money buying stuff that may or may not help.....yet.

>>>try using the central heating if the evenings are still getting cool...
>>>and the a/c in the day time if its hot and humid

like dmreilly10000 reports above some folks have had to run the ac and the central furnace at the same time.....(on the newer ones this isn't possible because the thermostat is all one unit for both)

but just try the furnace first....

cheers
2air'
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Old 05-20-2006, 12:47 AM   #41
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I support everything 2Air says in the above post, although I do find a fan heater useful. I should explain that my use of a fan heater in the night, rather than the furnace is because my wife wakes up every time the furnace fan blows on with the thermostat, even with ear-plugs! I tried to add this on edit yesterday, but I was too late.
Nick.
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