Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-01-2012, 11:19 AM   #1
New Member
 
1976 31' Sovereign
Durango , Colorado
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2
Non ducted VS Ducted

I have a 1976 31' that I am restoring to live in. I live in colorado and would like to use a non ducted electric heat but want to see if it will give off enough heat? If so how many BTU should be required to keep it warm in the middle of winter?

Thanks
__________________

__________________
ianburnett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 11:47 AM   #2
Rivet Master
Airstream Dealer
 
Inland RV Center, In's Avatar
 
Corona , California
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 16,499
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianburnett View Post
I have a 1976 31' that I am restoring to live in. I live in colorado and would like to use a non ducted electric heat but want to see if it will give off enough heat? If so how many BTU should be required to keep it warm in the middle of winter?

Thanks
Non ducted heating is not a very good idea.

All the copper tubing and and the 3 water tanks, must have a small degree of heat forced on them. Black, gray and fresh tanks.

Your Airstream was designed that way.

To defeat that system, is asking for freeze ups, big time.

Andy
__________________

__________________
Inland RV Center, In is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 12:07 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
Lumatic's Avatar

 
1971 25' Tradewind
1993 34' Excella
Currently Looking...
Estancia , New Mexico
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 6,642
Images: 16
Blog Entries: 1
You are talking about permanently installed electric heat? I think you will need 30 to 40,000 BTU. That much juice may require an electrical system upgrade. You know, of course, electric is significantly more expensive than propane for heating purposes.
__________________
Sail on silver girl. Sail on by. Your time has come to shine.
Lumatic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 12:24 PM   #4
Rivet Master
Airstream Dealer
 
Inland RV Center, In's Avatar
 
Corona , California
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 16,499
Images: 1
One watt is equal to 3.4 btu's

30,000 btu's would require 9,000 watts.

9,000 watts would require about 75 amperes of AC current, at 120 volts.

That is with absolutely nothing else turned on. No lights, no Univolt, etc.

The city power cord is rated at 30 amperes.

30 amps at 120 volts AC is only 3,600 watts.

Then the fuse panel would also have to go.

Then there is the fire hazard, by having that much heat without any degree of forced air distributing it.

Without forced air being directed to the duct system, a freeze up would most likely happen.

Furnaces really are a very cheap source of considerable heat.

Andy
__________________
Inland RV Center, In is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.