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Old 11-03-2011, 04:49 PM   #15
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One of the problems with space heaters I have had is the temperature controls do not keep an even temp during the night. Go to bed, its perfect, wake up during the night and its way too warm inside. Our winter trips last six months.

The Dyson is expensive but so is the furnace in our Airstream. They don't give propane away either, usually electric is included with hookups. If this thing kept a set temperature as claimed, I would consider it as good as the Airstream central heat (which is good) and buy it. Might give it a try unless someone has experience otherwise?

doug k
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Old 11-03-2011, 05:29 PM   #16
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Many of the small cheap space heaters have theromostats on them. It is not perfect digital proportional control though.

Perry
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Old 11-03-2011, 06:50 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
Our winter trips last six months.

The Dyson is expensive but so is the furnace in our Airstream. They don't give propane away either, usually electric is included with hookups.
Two comments,

1. As idroba points out, all resistance electric heaters give you the same amount of heat per watt-hour of electricity. You do have a choice of how it's delivered, by radiation (glowing coils), natural convection (oil filled radiator) or forced convection (Dyson or $14.95 fan-forced heater from Wal Mart).

At home, our baseboard hot water heating system is inefficient until the weather gets pretty cold, so we use a few of the oil filled radiator type electric heaters in the fall, and they work well for us. In the trailer we use the Wal Mart $14.95 fan-forced heater--which takes up a lot less space--and it also works well for us.

I really don't see any reason to spend $400 on an electric heater unless you are really taken by the styling. I doubt it will do a better job of distributing the heat than a $14.95 fan-forced heater.

2. We have found that most monthly campsite rentals meter your electricity use and bill for it in addition to the space rent.
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Old 11-03-2011, 07:05 PM   #18
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The campsite here in Tucson does not meter electric.

No doubt any resistance heater will provide heat. It's the consistent and comfortable temperature we're looking for. Four winters camping with various cheap heaters (motors don't last the season) have not provided even nighttime temperatures. A radiant heater does not evenly heat the trailer.

Otherwise it would take more than style to spend big bucks on a heater.

doug k
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Old 11-03-2011, 08:33 PM   #19
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Using electricity for heating is kind of like burning bird's eye maple wood for heat.... note that an electrically driven heat pump will use 2 or 3 times less electricity to deliver the same number of BTUs into the trailer...

However, since we're not full-timing, a small electric heater is perfect for our Airstream

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Old 11-03-2011, 09:11 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barts
Using electricity for heating is kind of like burning bird's eye maple wood for heat.... note that an electrically driven heat pump will use 2 or 3 times less electricity to deliver the same number of BTUs into the trailer...

However, since we're not full-timing, a small electric heater is perfect for our Airstream

- Bart
Are you saying I should not be burning birds eye maple for heat? Next thing you'll be telling me to stop using 20 dollar bills in the bathroom...
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Old 11-03-2011, 09:45 PM   #21
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This heater is a rip off IMO. It is probably about 1,500 watts, but the specs don't even list the heating output. The safest, quietest, most reliable and most even heat are the oil filled heaters. If you find that there are cold areas with the oil filled heaters then you have air leaks that need to be plugged or need more insulation in the walls, ceilings or windows. My second preference would be a small ceramic style heater. Their biggest advantage is that they are small and light and blow hot air where you can feel it. They are typically 1,500 watts also. Both of these heaters are less than $50 as stated earlier.

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Old 11-03-2011, 10:00 PM   #22
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When it gets cold enough to need a heater a heat pump is worthless. They spend more time defrosting etc than they do heating. I have a SEER 16 unit at home and still have $400 utility bills in the winter. When it is in the 30's you are pretty much running on heater strips anyway plus you have the additional expense of defrosting the thing. Maybe if you lived in a very dry climate they would work well but here in Alabama I have seen heat pumps freeze up at 50F because the humidity is 100%. Propane is probably the better deal for heating in this part of the country.

Perry

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Using electricity for heating is kind of like burning bird's eye maple wood for heat.... note that an electrically driven heat pump will use 2 or 3 times less electricity to deliver the same number of BTUs into the trailer...

However, since we're not full-timing, a small electric heater is perfect for our Airstream

- Bart
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Old 11-03-2011, 10:15 PM   #23
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Perry

I don't think that your heat pump is working properly. I live in VA and my heat pump is only an 11 SEER and my highest electric bill last Jan was $350.

Heat pumps are much preferred over electric resistance heat. The problem that you and most folks have is that the emergency/auxiliary heat is electric. The best system is to get a high SEER heat pump with propane backup heat, not electric.

Dan
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Old 11-03-2011, 10:51 PM   #24
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Long ago (in about 1990) I was taking an HVAC course in architorture school and working 60 hours/week or so. Since the boring prof really didn't teach much that wasn't in the reading, I dozed off from time to time. He caught me napping once and, being the schmuck he was, tried to trip me up with a question on the reading.

Prof: "Mr. Boyd, which is more efficient, gas heating appliances or electric?"
Me: "Hmm... do you mean total energy cycle efficiency, or just just the appliance itself?"
Prof: "Total efficiency."
Me: "Definitely gas."
Prof: "You should do the reading if you're going to sleep in class Mr. Boyd! Electric heat is highly efficient."
Me: "You should read the entire chapter and include the generation efficiency and transmission losses."

I have wondered which he hated more, me, or giving me an A in the class.

It's much less of a stark comparison when comparing gas heat to a good heat pump, but the lukewarm air from the vents of a forced-air heat pump system isn't very satisfying, and can't hold a candle to waking after hitting the snooze bar and hearing the lovely "whump" of the gas burner firing, about to warm up my living space.
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:18 PM   #25
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That's what I'm looking for Mr. Boyd, a satisfying heat. When I go to bed and set the heater at 65, it will be 65 in the Airstream all night long. I've never experienced that with cheapo box store heaters. Instead they seem to have thermostats that allow large and uncomfortable temperature swings during the night.

Six months of this in a not-so-cheapo Airstream and I'm ready to spring for a better heater. Wonder if the Dyson will do it, or is poor temperature control the nature of portable heaters?

doug k
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Old 11-03-2011, 11:28 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
That's what I'm looking for Mr. Boyd, a satisfying heat. When I go to bed and set the heater at 65, it will be 65 in the Airstream all night long. I've never experienced that with cheapo box store heaters. Instead they seem to have thermostats that allow large and uncomfortable temperature swings during the night.

Six months of this in a not-so-cheapo Airstream and I'm ready to spring for a better heater. Wonder if the Dyson will do it, or is poor temperature control the nature of portable heaters?

doug k
Part of the "lumpy" temperature control of small space heaters relates to the fact that the heater output is very near the thermostat, which is a very poor layout when the total size of the heating appliance is a very small fraction of the size of the volume to be heated. It's much better to have a thermostat near the air return (in a forced-air system) or at least as far as possible from any of the heat outlets.

While the Dyson's high-tech controls may help smooth this out somewhat, I'm guessing it still can't compete well with a properly laid-out forced-air system with a remote thermostat.
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Old 11-04-2011, 07:18 AM   #27
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The biggest problem with the cheap forced air heaters is that the fan stops running when the heat cycles off so the thermostat does not get an accurate temperature reading.

Perry
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Old 11-04-2011, 07:21 AM   #28
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A ground source heat pump is the way to go for a fixed installation. This eliminates all the efficiency problems with heat pumps due to air temperature fluctuations’.

Perry

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Perry

I don't think that your heat pump is working properly. I live in VA and my heat pump is only an 11 SEER and my highest electric bill last Jan was $350.

Heat pumps are much preferred over electric resistance heat. The problem that you and most folks have is that the emergency/auxiliary heat is electric. The best system is to get a high SEER heat pump with propane backup heat, not electric.

Dan
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