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Old 07-08-2005, 09:02 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrenchBern
...I fixed the entire shroud by using fiberglass cloth and/or fiberglass mat with gorilla glue instead of polyester resins...
I am happy to hear that you had good results with gorilla glue as I would not have thought the stuff suitable for two reasons.

Gorilla glue is a polyurethane based glue. While it is different than polyester resin, it still glue, and glues generally do not stick to plastics for the long haul.

I use gorilla glue a lot for gluing boards together to make large panels. It works well because it expands as it cures, and penetrates into the wood's pores. The foam that seeps out of the joint can be easily scraped off once it totally cures. I would have thought this foaminess would lessen the rigidity of the fiberglas-reinforced repair area.

I used ABS cement to fix my shroud because it will solvent weld with the existing plastic. There is a write-up at my website if you are interested.

Tom
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Old 07-08-2005, 10:39 AM   #30
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TomW: Great website documentation! I'm very glad our shroud isn't in the state yours was in. We have a few holes that range in size from dime to Coke bottle bottom. Nothing near the reconstruction you endured. We do have an eight inch crack to repair.

I guess I don't know what I will use. I already have both ABS glue and Gorilla. I actually like the idea of the Gorilla glue better, but share your concerns about long-term adhesion. I'm not so concerned about rigidity since the shroud is plastic to begin with and is not a hard plastic.
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Old 07-09-2005, 12:06 AM   #31
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sovereignrwe, any type of tape will do. I usually use masking tape or fiber reinforced tape just to match the contour and prevent having to sand the finished side. (I am lazy and don't like to create additional work.
The figerglass cloth and mat was leftover from my boat building days. However it is available in auto stores (like advance store) in small quantities. I also just tried Elmer's glue which appears to be the same as gorilla glue but at 2/3 the price.
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Old 07-09-2005, 09:57 PM   #32
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Fiberglass cloth purchased from Automotive store. Gorilla glue is applied. Metal backed duct tape applied to strengthen topside separations. Plastic-Kote High Temp paint applied in Hot Rod White and Aluminum.

So far so good.

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Old 04-21-2006, 07:56 PM   #33
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I hope I'm not doing anything wrong by digging up this old thread but I find these A/C units very remarkable. With the heat coming on I'm wanting to get ready for it. I learned today that my Armstrong A/C has the option of HEATING the air and not just cooling it. I wondered why my Armstrong thermostat (on the wall to the right of the fridge) had a "heat" selection and now I think I know! I thought someone replaced the thermostat or something. I still haven't tried the heat part yet. I would like to post the question for anyone who knows, If I'm running the coach on a #12 cord from the house, is that eneugh power to run the A/C? I'm worried that a bottle neck in the electicity flow may be bad for the motor? Not sure how many amps it pulls. Sorry I don't have my model number. Also, I read someplace that in a car it was good for the compressor to run the AC for very short times even in the winter to keep everything properly lubricated, you think the same would be true with the Armstrong unit as well?

Thanks in advance for the help! This site is great!

Brian
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Old 04-21-2006, 10:43 PM   #34
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Hi Brian,
I have a 1966 Airstream Overlander that's still operating on the old Armstrong unit. Mine does not have heat capabilities though. The heat option should be an electric heating strip which would be installed on the inside coil and require a relay for control.

The normal power supply should be from a 30 amp service. This would be #10 AWG wire from the house breaker to a 30 amp receptacle, and also a #10 AWG power cord on the RV. Wire size #10 is rated at 30 amps and # 12 at 20 amps. Your AC probably pulls somewhere close to 14 amps by itself. If anything else is running, such as lights, refrigerator etc, this could very easily overload the #12 wire. The larger problem with wire size is the voltage drop that occurs. Simply stated, the smaller and longer the wire and the more the amps, the more voltage that is dropped on the wire. Motors are designed to operate on their rated voltage. If this voltage is low, the motor looses efficiency and excessive heat develops. This is extremely detrimental to electric motors and can shorten their life or even burn up the motor. (The same result happens when electric motorized power tools are used with a long undersized extension cord). That said, I have used an adapter and a standard 20 amp (#12 wire) circuit to check and service my AC, but only for periods not exceeding 20 minutes.

The oil in this type of AC acts as a lubricant for the seals as well as the internal moving parts. Operating the AC frequently will help keep these parts lubricated and is generally recommended.

Good luck and I'm sure you'll get more responses to this.
Calvin
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Old 04-22-2006, 05:48 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by overlander76
I hope I'm not doing anything wrong by digging up this old thread ... I'm running the coach on a #12 cord from the house, is that eneugh power to run the A/C? ...
Nothing wrong with digging up an old thread; In fact, it is preferred. Adding to an old thread gives future seekers less threads to pore through when looking for an answer to their question. Karma to you.

Although a 10 gauge wire is preferred, a 12 gauge wire should be sufficient to run just the air conditioner. But only do it if you have your voltmeter pugged into an outlet in your Airstream. Five or ten seconds after the initial startup, do NOT run the air conditioner if the voltage drops below 115 vac. In a perfect world, you would like to see 120 vac. But if your house is supplying good power to the 12 gauge cord, you will probably see 117-118 vac.

Tom
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Old 09-15-2006, 11:47 AM   #36
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Working Armstrongs

Hey all,
I am new to this forum and new to Airstream.

Can anyone tell me what a fair price would be for a working armstrong with shroud?
-Bren
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Old 09-15-2006, 08:11 PM   #37
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Hi, Bren,

Welcome to the forums.

To answer your question, it would depend. I would want to stand in front of it and feel it blow on my face, and then I would want to look at the shroud very critically.

I have no idea what I'd offer for one, but I do have a Carrier V on one of my trailers that worked for 25 months that now won't start the compressor.

I have an Armstrong on the other trailer that seems to have worked since 1979, including some years of living full-time (#1 PO) in the Arizona desert. #2 PO let it rest for the next ten years, and I've exercised it since.

I'd also want to know if it were exactly the same A/C. Airstream seems to have used, um, maybe three of them?

So, while I can't tell you what I'd pay for an old air conditioner, I can tell you what I won't ever pay again for a new one: $786.

Good luck,

Lamar
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Old 09-16-2006, 11:21 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SafeHarbor
Hi, Bren,

Welcome to the forums.

To answer your question, it would depend. I would want to stand in front of it and feel it blow on my face, and then I would want to look at the shroud very critically.

I have no idea what I'd offer for one, but I do have a Carrier V on one of my trailers that worked for 25 months that now won't start the compressor.

I have an Armstrong on the other trailer that seems to have worked since 1979, including some years of living full-time (#1 PO) in the Arizona desert. #2 PO let it rest for the next ten years, and I've exercised it since.

I'd also want to know if it were exactly the same A/C. Airstream seems to have used, um, maybe three of them?

So, while I can't tell you what I'd pay for an old air conditioner, I can tell you what I won't ever pay again for a new one: $786.

Good luck,

Lamar
Thanks for the info.
I got cought in a weird situation where I had a great AC that blew cold, but would not run off my generator (Honda 3000is) overload when trying to start up everytime.
I switched it out for a penguin which doesn't seem to blow as cold. Not sure whats up there, but I think I got taken to the cleaners price wise...Live and learn...The installer dosen't seem to know much about professional installs as they left screws on top, old materials from the removal of the last unit and daubs of caulking all around the area where the old unit was. (thought it'd be commonplace to smooth that stuff over for appearances)
Plus after requesting numerous times to store the old unit in a safe place, they threw it out in a pile.

I am trying to move into the DIY arena, but still learning...(rant over - thanks for listening)

Either way, I have the "armstrong" with a shroud that looks like its in good condition. Not falling apart, etc... I would like to sell and re-coup as much as I can for the cost of the penguin.

I really wish in hindsight I could have stuck with the old unit as it really blew cold and strong.

Well, see ya at the rallies...
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Old 09-16-2006, 06:17 PM   #39
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I have a 69 airstream with a armstrong tac-110, 210 series D air conditioner....I fired it up after 20 years of sitting....it kick on for a second or two and shuts down.....wall mounted thermostac....I was planning to just buy a newer unit....but after reading all the emails, maybe I should try and repair this one...............not sure if a recharge would work, or last since it has been sitting so long, but fan runs, it sounds like it kick in....and then kick right back out......................any ideas out there if you were me..........
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Old 09-17-2006, 05:59 PM   #40
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Hi Safety6761,
You need to check the unit on top and see exactly what it is doing. I don't remember seeing a low pressure cutout switch on my 1966 Overlander. The compressor will have an overload device that would sysle power to it if the rotor was locked up. You can check this by measuring the amperage draw of the compressor or checking the refrigerant pressures. Before you apply power, I reccommend that you do a good visual inspection of the wiring connections, capacitor and contactor. Good luck,
Calvin Cole
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Old 09-20-2006, 06:22 PM   #41
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Wishing I lived closer to Austin. Have a buddy in Austin that could store it for me, but getting it to Iowa for my parents would be tough, or expensive.
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Old 11-12-2006, 12:21 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thenewkid64
The condensation "should" drain out of a small black tube that sticks out of the belly just in front of the wheels on the roadside (oppisite the door).

Good luck!
I have rain water collecting inside the condenser tray on my 89 sarfari and there is a drain line on the interior of the a/s that runs from the condenser tray along the roof and down behind the cabinets to the outside.


Question 1. is it normal for rain to collect in the condensation pan?


Question 2 Does the description of the drain line sound like the original set up?

air conditioner is an Armstrong unit. Thanks for the advice. Carl
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