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Old 01-20-2004, 01:24 PM   #15
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whe do not have that big problems here in the netherlands
if parts fall of and give damage to others insurance pay's
I do not need a insurance on the trailor
when trailor in behind the car
car insurance covers the trailor as well
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Old 09-22-2004, 08:17 AM   #16
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Shroud reconstruction

Quote:
Originally Posted by tcwilliams
I'm lining up possible repair techniques for my A/C cover.
Quote:
Originally Posted by InlandRV
Some repairs create a "liability" problem.
A mere seven months later, I have completed repairs to my air conditioner shroud. Scratch what I said about making new plastic. There was no reason to as it is already available commercially as ABS Cement. “Cement” is somewhat of a misnomer since when this stuff is used, it does not glue plastic parts together, it solvent welds them together. There is effectively no bond line for separation to occur.

Keeping in mind what Andy said, I decided there were two challenges to this project: Fill the existing holes, and strengthen the entire shroud. While I have tons of step-by-step pictures for anyone who is really interested, the pictures below show the shroud before the repair, the inside of the shroud reinforced with ABS Cement-impregnated fiberglass mat, and the completed shroud painted in it’s original color.

Edit - There is a picture of the cover installed in the photo section.

Ultimately, the only “flying debris” issue of concern is the small amount of Bondo used to make the patch lines look good. But the since the amount used was so small, I see no associated safety hazard for anyone traveling behind me.

Although I did not weigh the shroud before or after the repair, I was careful to not glob cement or mat on unnecessarily. The shroud does not appear to be unusually heavy.

Tom
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Old 09-22-2004, 11:31 AM   #17
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Tom, excellent work! A true labor of love. Thanks for the information about the repair method and materials. I thought that stuff was irrepairable. Nick
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Old 09-22-2004, 11:46 AM   #18
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Tom.

Looks great.

But........you still have a plastic cover.

Andy
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Old 09-22-2004, 11:47 AM   #19
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To the Obewon of Schrouds

Tom, you did an excellent job! With the cover in the condition that you started with its amazing, it looks damn fine and well crafted. Congrats on a job well done.

The cover on mine is not filmsy as its a good 1/4" thick fiberglass. After all these posts about being so thin, I was pleasently surprised. It is also secured with 13 screws around its base. The issue with this one is that the surface has deteriorated and the fiber is slightly exposed. My intent is to encapsulate it with a couple coats of the proper paint and change the color, maybe a metalic pewter. A premium grade automotive paint appears to be the best choice for fiberglass.

There was one chunk missing from the end sidewall that I think was a result of being smacked by a tree limb. I chose the 'battle scar' approach for it's patch. However I may follow through with a continuious aluminum strip riveted in place along the entire end to unify. Doing fiberglass work does not excite me. Besides, I like the battle scar, demonstrates character, kinda like hail dents and rivets in holes where old accessories were removed.

My AC unit is a DuoTherm Brisk Air XL Supreme. I ran it for a few hours and all worked well. The patch jobs present (PO) on 2 of the lines appears to be OK. I did a rub on the name plate and came away with the serial and unit numbers but have no clue as to where to find out more specs on this unit, its age, and the care and maintenance for it. Any comments in this direction would be appreciated.

Again Tom, fine looking effort.
Ed
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Old 09-22-2004, 12:26 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Inland RV Center, In
But........you still have a plastic cover.
Au contraire!

With the fiberglass mat used in the reconstruction, I have a part plastic, part fiberglass cover.

It's...it's...a Frankenshroud !!!


Tom
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Old 09-22-2004, 12:40 PM   #21
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Stronger, faster.....
It's the six million dollar shroud..... (insert six million dollar man music here)

Sounds better than Frankenshroud, but with Holloween coming, I guess it is OK for now. :P
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Old 09-22-2004, 12:40 PM   #22
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Here's the real deal. Bought it from Andy, assembled, painted and installed it myself. Heavy duty stuff.
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Old 02-13-2007, 10:51 AM   #23
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This post is almost 3 years old and I found it both informative and amusing. I applaud TomW for his re-creation. GREAT JOB! Thanks to balrgn, I have a replacement shroud for my Armstrong at a VERY affordable price. I plan on reinforcing it by using one or more combinations of the following:

1. Riveting aluminum
2. Fiberglassing mat (resin and/or cement)
3. ABS cement
4. Fiberglassed wood?
5. Good paint

P.S. Follow me at your own risk. My insurance agent says I have flying plastic coverage.
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Old 10-27-2012, 04:23 PM   #24
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Eight years later

Back in post #16, I showed a picture of my Overlander's rebuilt A/C shroud.

After ~35,000 miles of Airstreaming, the shroud had to be removed for a motor replacement:

Adventures of a Curious Fellow: Yet Another A/C Repair

Attached is an image of what the shroud looked like before being repainted just a few days ago.

All-in-all, I am happy with how it has aged. While the Bondo popped off long ago, the shroud is still structurally sound.

Tom
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Old 11-18-2012, 04:28 PM   #25
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Armstrong AC Shroud.

I have purchased a shroud for the Armstrong Airconditioner on my74 Airstream and woud sure appreciate some advice as to how it shoud be attached. Are the 4 screws attaching the shroud to the squirrel cage frame sufficient to combate wind resistance, If not, what else should I do? Also should I rivet or screw the two pieces of the shroud together at the aluminum moulding. Sure would appreciate some advice.
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Old 11-18-2012, 04:40 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by October View Post
I have purchased a shroud for the Armstrong Airconditioner on my74 Airstream and woud sure appreciate some advice as to how it shoud be attached. Are the 4 screws attaching the shroud to the squirrel cage frame sufficient to combate wind resistance, If not, what else should I do? Also should I rivet or screw the two pieces of the shroud together at the aluminum moulding. Sure would appreciate some advice.
Fasten the 2 halves together with pop rivet at the seal where the molding will hide the rivets.

The shroud is held in place with 4 screws using fender washers underneath them.

Do no seal the bottom of the shroud to the roof.

Andy
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Old 11-19-2012, 06:02 PM   #27
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I've just purchased a 2005 Safari Bambi and it too has cracks in the AC cover. Having used Epoxy in boat repair and building, I believe cleaning the inside of the cover, patching with an epoxy fiberglassed patch at the cracked areas will work very well. It adhers to just about everything. If the cracks can be pried open, put some resin in there before the patch. Interlux brighsides, commonly used on boats, has many colors and is easy to apply a very nice, long lasting finish. I plan on doing it when warmer weather returns, next year. good luck
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Old 02-07-2014, 09:59 PM   #28
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Reviving an old thread here. I had small cracks and have "made my own" glue as in the past (like Tom did), but the stuff you can buy at store works just as well.

An ever stronger glue :

Jamestown distributors (and others stores) sell West Systems G-flex epoxy which works the best for repairs that need some flexibility. I used it for the cracks and bonded fiberglass cloth on the underside. Its stronger than ever and cost less than $30.

I already had some Interlux marine paint so used that to paint- should be good for another 7-10 years or so.
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