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Old 07-10-2006, 06:15 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lewster
What power utility do you guys use? I haven't seen 110 VAC for years. The last time I plugged in my Fluke RMS multimeter, it read between 119-121 VAC .
So, Lewster, what have you to say about the previous post?
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Old 07-10-2006, 06:26 AM   #30
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30 amp service

This morning I am having an electrician install a 30 amp outlet to plug my trailer into without using the adaptor. It will have its own circuit breaker in the basement of our house. Want to plug in from the driveway when not in campground. Costing me $400. About 20 feet of line from the box to the new outlet. Is this a worthwhile thing to do? Or am I wasting money?

Larry
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Old 07-10-2006, 06:48 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry2952
That would be true, if you were not an electrician, which I am. The rule of thumb is that you should never load a circuit in excess of 80% of its capacity. I like to use 75%, but then I'm a cautious person.

In addition, should voltage be 110 volts there is a proportional decrease in the capacity of the circuit. Your formula does not allow for voltage fluctuations, which I'm sure we've all experienced.
don't forget when calculating motor loads you would use a multiplier of 125% of full load current (FLA) for the inrush start up of an inductive load such as a motor when considering your wire sizes!
ampacities for 14ga thhn is25a, 12ga is30a and 10ga is40a @86deg fahrn.

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Old 07-10-2006, 07:08 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickleton
This morning I am having an electrician install a 30 amp outlet to plug my trailer into without using the adaptor. It will have its own circuit breaker in the basement of our house. Want to plug in from the driveway when not in campground. Costing me $400. About 20 feet of line from the box to the new outlet. Is this a worthwhile thing to do? Or am I wasting money?

Larry
If that includes trenching and pipe work installation, its a fair price. If it's just a cord plugged into an outlet on the house, it's a rip-off.

What benefit do you get from going to a 30-amp from a 20-amp if it's just parked? I can see the expense if someone were living in it and wanted to run multiple appliances.
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Old 07-10-2006, 07:20 AM   #33
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30 amp

I thought it would be a safe thing to do, having a dedicated outlet for the trailer, and spending some time in the driveway with Air Conditioning. A newbie here, so we spend time hanging out in it. No trench or piping. Just adding a circuit breaker and line to an outlet.

Thanks for input
Larry
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Old 07-10-2006, 07:22 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crowbar68
don't forget when calculating motor loads you would use a multiplier of 125% of full load current (FLA) for the inrush start up of an inductive load such as a motor when considering your wire sizes!
ampacities for 14ga thhn is25a, 12ga is30a and 10ga is40a @86deg fahrn.

crowbar
Your information is very misleading. MOHOs must comply with NECA. 14 gauge is 15-amp, 12 gauge is 20-amp and 10 gauge is 30-amps. Your disinformation could burn up a MOHO.

Once again. The wire may be able to handle the amperage you stated but the outlets are not. Your calculations go right out the window on a 100° day when the temperature behind the aluminum skin reaches 140°.
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Old 07-10-2006, 07:26 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mickleton
I thought it would be a safe thing to do, having a dedicated outlet for the trailer, and spending some time in the driveway with Air Conditioning. A newbie here, so we spend time hanging out in it. No trench or piping. Just adding a circuit breaker and line to an outlet.

Thanks for input
Larry
A single pole 30-amp breaker, outdoor oulet box and cover comes to about $50.00 in parts. If you think $350.00 in labor to drill a hole in your house, run some romex and hook up an outlet is fair, go for it.
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Old 07-10-2006, 07:34 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry2952
Your information is very misleading. MOHOs must comply with NECA. 14 gauge is 15-amp, 12 gauge is 20-amp and 10 gauge is 30-amps. Your disinformation could burn up a MOHO.

Once again. The wire may be able to handle the amperage you stated but the outlets are not. Your calculations go right out the window on a 100° day when the temperature behind the aluminum skin reaches 140°.
i was hoping you would bite on that info. i'm mearly pointing out that the wire sizes used for the breakers are more than AMPle to handle the load (125%). you should not upsize your breaker. but you knew that! and don't forget to derate. that's neca
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Old 07-10-2006, 07:37 AM   #37
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Oh Boy

Wow, thanks for the info. I will ask him to break down the cost. I remember him saying that the wire alone would cost $100. Hate getting ripped off. He has not showed up yet. So you that a dedicated service is not really needed.

Larry
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Old 07-10-2006, 08:09 AM   #38
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dedicated circuit

a dedicated circuit is nice. it just depends how much you use it in your driveway. i have a 20a single pole for mine w/ no trouble. i just run my ac and a few lights. it is not a dedicated circuit but i'm not running anything substantial off of it out of my garage. there are similiar threads that talk about this. if you run microwave, blow dryer and ac w/ other things who knows! $400 does seem pricey,but it is east coast.

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Old 07-10-2006, 08:27 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverback
Back home again and catching up on posts. We lost WiFi access so I wasn't able to report on the campground voltage. It stayed a steady 110 VAC everytime I measured it. Ken
Just a thought, take a look at the device you used to measure the voltage with. Some of the low cost devices have a variance factor of up to 10%. Consider that into the equation as to what your real voltage was at that site.

Also be aware that obviously running on auto will increase the run time since the A/C unit is not running at its peak effeciency. That means depending upon the line and its connections, you will be building more heat that could cause a weak breaker to trip.

In my days with my SOB I used to plug into my 20 amp service in the garage at home. I used one of those adapter plugs to mate the 30 amp trailer plug into the outlet. Normally I ran the A/C on high but for some reason this time I ran it on low speed. The A/C unit had some long run times and coming out into the garage I found that the adapter had begun to melt down from the heat generated though that adapter.

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Old 07-10-2006, 09:01 AM   #40
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Melting adapters mean you are way over the limit for that device. You really need to put in a 30 amp RV plug box so you do not have to use a cheap adapter. If the lines feeding the outlet are the proper size and not servicing anything else you might be able to get away with just replacing the box without putting in a dedicated line and a new breaker down stairs. To do it per code, you would need to do the whole thing right. Unless you know what you are doing, it is good to hire a professional. That said, there are alot of home repair rip of artists out there. Hard to tell the difference unless you check the better business bureau or can get some personal references.
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Old 07-10-2006, 12:05 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightdi
Melting adapters mean you are way over the limit for that device. You really need to put in a 30 amp RV plug box so you do not have to use a cheap adapter.
Oh I realized that. I think the AC unit was rated at 13 amps, that adapter I think was rated at 15. My point really was the fact that running the unit up on high really caused more cycling of the compressor, which in turn allowed that adapter to cool off between cycles. Running at low didn't allow that to happen which ultimately caused a melt down. Weak breakers exhibit a similar tendency in that a long run time on low might cause enough heat to cause that breaker to pop, whereas on high, the compressor cycles thus leading to less heat build up.

Granted I don't do this anymore. Thanks for the reminder though.

Jack
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Old 07-10-2006, 12:41 PM   #42
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i agree, i think the circuit breaker is doing its job. you probably need to go to a 30amp breaker.
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