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Old 05-05-2002, 10:52 PM   #15
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Steve,

I have a 33 year old AS trailer with the original fridge which works great. I sometime wonder if the older ones last longer?

We set the fridge on electric when we put the trailer in the drive way, usually 2 or 3 days before we leave for a trip. Just before we leave, I light the propane. We keep it on propane for the entire trip, even when in a campground with electric. Once the trailer is home and empty, we turn off the gas and let the fridge defrost, wipe it clean, and leave the door open when stored.

I have not measured the internal temprature, but motivated by this thread plan to do so when we next use the trailer.

Jim
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Old 05-06-2002, 07:34 AM   #16
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Returning from first trip of the season

Well, we're back ...

I found that the gas does not work so great on the fridge, and will probable have it checked at some point. Not sure if it is the flume or some other reason. The LP tank was low... But once we arrived at camp and plugged into shore power, the cooling process did start. Well, at a setting of 5 on electric... the fridge got to 40F. The freezer was somewhere near zero... My unit in my house doesnt work this well... Mark up another one for the foresite of those engineers at Airstream to use these great units. I was satisfied with the operation on this trip, but I will plug in before I go on a trip next time.
I guess now, I will do some work with the TV.
New thread.... Antenna wiring?? accessible?

Steve
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Old 05-06-2002, 07:37 AM   #17
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leveling delema??

Well, what I have done. I parked my camper and leveled my TT to the level indications in the frezzer compartment. I then set up my Tamarak level on the front. Now its a nobrainer...

Steve
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Old 05-06-2002, 09:05 AM   #18
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Re: leveling delema??

Quote:
Originally posted by tenrsingr
Well, what I have done. I parked my camper and leveled my TT to the level indications in the frezzer compartment. I then set up my Tamarak level on the front. Now its a nobrainer...

Steve
Great Steve. Sounds like you are getting there step by step. As far as the gas problems, you may have a burner that has a spider web clog. On most RV refrigerators there is an inspection plate that is on the tall round cylinder that houses the burner/heater assembly. If you get that open you can check the burner and see what condition it is in.

Jack
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Old 05-06-2002, 11:05 AM   #19
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I have seen in the Camping World catalog an exhaust fan for a varity of refer's and one specifically designed for A/S trailers. (side discharge I believe) What is the purpose and is a fan of that type necessary? ~~~~~~~ I am getting ready for my first trip and I am nervous about a refer that has no moving parts. I know it works cause I plugged it in and after 4 or 5 hours the inside coils were cold. Even when the trailer was not completely level. Have not used propane yet. Which is another question. Isn't is dangerous to lite the propane on the refer and travel down the road with it the gas going?

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Old 05-06-2002, 01:06 PM   #20
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The 12 volt fans that are sold to go in back of the fridge are reccomended to help with the natrual convection of cool air in the bottom, hot air out the top of the refer flue. By installing a booster fan you help to keep more air moving and increase the efficency of the refer. This fan is very important in hot weather as the ambient temp of the outside air may only be a few degrees cooler that the air in the flue. This condition can lead to VERY poor efficency of the cooling unit. Moving additional air thru the flue can keep your beer cold on a very hot day. Also if your refer is on the curb side it helps to put out your awning as it will shade the side of the trailer and help keep the ambient temp lower.
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Old 05-06-2002, 01:32 PM   #21
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The exterior fan will help in the effeciency of the refrigerator. Obviously it is not necessary since natural convection (heat rising) will draw in cooler air through the side door albeit not as quickly as if you had a fan blowing up the compartment.

The issue of driving with the gas on has lots of opinions. Personally I consider it a fairly safe practice, especially in light of the new POL valves which will cut off the gas if a heavy discharge occurs.

The real danger is the refueling issue when you pull into a gas station. Gasoline fumes can find their way into and around the refrigerator potentially causing an explosion and fire.

I always pull off before fueling to shut down the refrigerator. I do not relight until I'm away from the fuel dispensing area. I do this faithfully. If you don't think you can do this, then travel with the gas off.

Jack
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Old 05-06-2002, 02:07 PM   #22
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Thanks Brett,

As you might have noticed I live in Phoenix, and plan on travelling to Mexico. Outside temps have been known to get to 120+ in June. (Course it's a dry heat ha ha ha) And I do not plan on being in my trailer during those times. However triple didget temps I will encounter. ~~~~ And my refer is on the curb side under the awning. So my awning will have multiple functions. ~~~~

Thanks Jack for the advise on traveling. I have not upgraded my propane tanks. (The current ones are junk anyway) And my fuel tank fill is on the opposite side of my van than the refer, however why take the chance. So it is reasonable that if I travel with the refer on propane and the flame goes out, the gas will be turned off with the new POL valve?

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Old 05-06-2002, 02:39 PM   #23
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On the traveling with gas on issue, I do it but I also shut down the gas when pulling into a gas station, I have seen sone of the pictures of folks that did not and most RV's do not look good burnt!

The refer should shut off automatically when the unit goes out. There is a termocouple that will cause the safety valve to close with minimum LP gas loss. So the only worry is if it goes out while towing. I have not ever had one go out while towing, unless I ran out of gas.

There are some states that will not allow you to have the propane on while towing especially those that have tunnels. It is illegal to tow thru most tunnels with the propane on at the tank.
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Old 05-06-2002, 03:45 PM   #24
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Traveling with gas on.

As noted earlier if your flame blows out, the thermocouple should shut off the main gas supply. I have run out of gas while traveling and my refrigerator will attempt 3 times to automatically relight. If it fails, the check light comes on the gas valve stays closed and no further relights are attempted until I cycle the unit off/on switch.

Keep in mind that each refrigerator has it own way of handling either condition based on its vintage and brand. Your's will probably operate differently in some aspects to mine.

While your tow vehicle gas fill and trailer refrigerator are on different sides, the issue of leaving the refrigerator lite should not depend upon this orientation. In many cases you may have gas pumps on either side of your trailer and lots of wind currents picking up gas vapors from others fueling their cars or trucks. This should not be a situation that requires any choices. The refrigerator needs to be turned off. If you can't maintain that disipline, then travel with the gas off.

Personally, I would rather not refuel at the same time another RV is fueling since I do not know what the state of his refrigerator is. Call me paranoid but the only one I can count on is me.

Regards,

Jack
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Old 05-06-2002, 09:55 PM   #25
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I am in the habit of leaving my fridge lit all times, including when refueling the tow vehicle. My old fridge is a pain to light. Someone on the inside has to press and hold the pilot button while I unlock the exterior cover, reach inside the compartment and light the burner with the butane lighter, replace the exterior door and lock it.

The fridge is on the opposite side of the trailer from the truck's fuel tank. I never pull the trailer next to the gas island. I only pull up to the first pump and leave the trailer back away from any of the gas pumps. This practice may just provide a false sense of security. I once witnessed a kid filling a gas can spill gas all over the cement. I backed the trailer out onto the street rather than drive past. That kind of event makes you realize Jack is correct in his post. The safest option is to extinguish the flame before fueling. I'll have to find a way quick and easy procedure to extinguish and relight the fridge from the outside to obtain an adequate level of safety and convenience.

Jim
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Old 05-07-2002, 08:19 AM   #26
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Jim,
I appreciate your candor. You are prime evidance that my paranoia regarding other RV's at gas stations isn't unfounded. It's just not worth the potential of calamity that lurks if you continue to fuel with it on.

On the plus side a cold refrigerator can maintain a fairly safe temperature for quite a few hours. You might consider preloading it the night before you leave. The inherent cold from the contents will also help in maintaining temperature.

Since I have always traveled with the refrigerator on (we always seem to carry some form of ice cream), I'm not sure what the point is when you approach unacceptable temperatures. I would guess a lot would depend upon outside temperatures.


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Old 05-07-2002, 12:27 PM   #27
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I normally only travel 200/250 miles a day, so I don't light the gas on the refer. It stays good & cold for 5 or 6 hours until I reach the next camp ground. I do leave the water heater with the gas on most of the time. I seldom ever stop for gas because I can go at least 350 miles or more on a tank, so I always fill the tank before hooking up & I don't have to stop for gas. I have stopped for gas & forgot about the water heater being on. I won't let that happen again! Jack's right, don't pull in next to another RV pumping gas. It might be me forgetting the water heater was on!
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Old 05-08-2002, 05:29 PM   #28
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Somewhere I read that opening the door of the fridge to see how cold it is inside causes a tremendous loss of cooling. So I can tell what the temps are I installed a remote sensing indoor/outdoor electronic thermometer. The unit is installed by the fridge and the sensor wire runs thru the abck of the fridge where other wires come in. Now I know how hot it is the motorhome as well as the temp in the fridge.

$20.00 at Radio Shack.
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