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Old 02-10-2012, 10:49 AM   #15
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Lots of good posts here, and I pretty much agree with all of them.

The only thing that I might add is that rv fridges seem to have a hard time keeping cold when the outside temperature is real high. To help with this, and no matter what type of fridge you install, I would install some additional insulation around the fridge so that it will cool better in hot weather and also use less energy to keep cool (ie less propane or less battery).

Dan
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Old 02-10-2012, 11:08 AM   #16
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Good points

Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokelessJoe View Post
Musicmaster,

If you’ve spent any amount of time on these forums you’ll know that you need to consider the difference between opinion and experience when shifting through the advice.

Many of the opinions given here so far are based on bias and conventional thinking and many of the points offered –about weight, resale, power draw, el cheapo renos, etc. – are just conjecture or plain wrong.

Whether you can use a 110 v. fridge depends mostly on how you plan to use the trailer. If you’re going to be mainly in the boonies then 110v is probably not so workable. I think you already knew that when you posted.

I opted for a small, very light, 8.6 cubic foot LG household fridge for my remodel. I’ve used it for 5 years without a hint of a problem.

Attachment 150663

The idea was put into my head by Andy Thompson, the long time Airstream dealer at London, Ontario, when he opined that a household fridge like this is a perfect size for trailer living and could easily be powered by a 1500 watt inverter.

His said it was well built but lighter than an RV fridge and cost 75% less. It could be repaired anywhere by pretty much anyone – no tricky LP or 12v systems. You could actually throw it out and get a new one if it ever broke down.

The fridge normally operates on shore power but when I am going overland for any serious amount of time, or dry-camped overnight, it operates perfectly off of my battery pack.

Attachment 150664

Sergei

See my main thread here:

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f227/contemporizing-1976-argosy-d-opinions-please-18448.html#post182701
I'm also in the middle of a rebuild and had considered another fridge so that we would have more capacity. Sergie, that LG that you have looks nice a testament to it's durability is the amount of time you have had it and it still works well. I think you do put some miles on your trailer. Unfortunately I think you might have a hard time replacing as I did not find that it is still readily available.
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Old 02-10-2012, 11:51 AM   #17
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fridge

I've got a Fridgedaire in mine, so far its working good in my 68 Ambassador. But, It'sonlymy first time out with the trailer. I live in it full time for 6months out of the year, with full hook ups, so thats not a problem for me. Its only a couple months old, so can't say how long its going to last. I've had 2 fridges go out in my house in 2 years. And it sits still. Go figure. Guess it depends on how you'll be using your trailer for you though.
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Old 02-10-2012, 03:53 PM   #18
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While it is rare that we spend the night at a location without electricity, we do make stops during the day while traveling and it is in this situation where we most often depend on the propane fridge. Our fridge cools well and so there's no stress about the food if we stop for errands or coffee or sightseeing or whatever in the course of a journey.

Sergei's setup is unusual in many regards and his success with a household fridge is due in large measure to an unusually large and well designed battery and inverter system.
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Old 02-10-2012, 04:05 PM   #19
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SilverHoot,

Appliances, AC plants, etc. seem built to have a 15 to 20 year useful life so I won't need to worry about replacement unless I'm unlucky and it breaks down.

This currently available LG is bigger than mine, 10.6 cubic feet, but the exact same weight - 69 pounds - and dimensions.

Refrigerators | LG GR-349R Bottom Freezer Refrigerator | LG Electronics Canada
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Old 02-10-2012, 05:48 PM   #20
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Jammer,

I think all the colour photos make my outfit look more exotic than it is.

My battery set up is pretty much the standard stuff that many other owners have: a couple of AGM’s and a charger/converter. The inverter is just an everyday Canadian Tire (like AutoZone in your country) model.

I guess the real reason that I got a regular fridge is that I don’t have propane. Why pay for the extra fanciness?

I’m just saying that people who want to consider the household fridge option shouldn’t be deterred by the traditionalist naysayers and the misinformation about stuff like weight and current draw or the attitudes about cheapening or ruining a trailer experience.

I think the household fridge option has attractions like serviceability, contemporary styling, size, weight and price among others.

A quick search on Amazon shows an equivalent to my fridge is $700 so my set up is less than half the cost of the standard RV way. Most of the other fridges listed are under $500, so, with inverter, that’s a quarter the cost.

I installed my set up for a practical reason rather that to save money but this comparison shows another legitimate reason to ask if you must have a 3-way fridge.

Unless one is primarily a boondocker, going household is a valid option that can also give more style, size and performance for less money.

Plugging into the inverter is basically the same as turning on the gas.

Sergei
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Old 02-10-2012, 06:19 PM   #21
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I would go with a good RV type fridge. The inverter idea is good, but what about a stop over on the way to your vacation. What if you have truck trouble and have wait to have the truck fixed? Will you ever go to a Nascar race and boon dock ? Even if you have a generator I would not want to run it 24/7.

Propane fridge will run for weeks on propane.Inverter will drain your battery in a few hours. How many batteries are you willing to add?

The RV fridges look better in general and fit tighter in the cabinets. Resale is better with a RV type fridge .

I have never had a problem with a RV fridge on two different used campers. Buy a new fridge and it comes with a warranty and then buy a extended warranty if you are worried about it.
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:02 PM   #22
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Is anyone familiar with a Dometic NDA1402 wide by side fridge. I am looking at getting it for my A/S. Only problem is if it will fit through the door. Dometic said it was 26" +/- 1/8". I asked which one, plus 1/8 will not fit and -1/8 will, they did not know. Not a lot of help considering they made it. Any ideas?
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:15 PM   #23
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Acording to this, it is even deeper (29 5/8") than you stated.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...7pJ8Nie7Otps6Q

The doors could be removed to get it in, but it still might not fit.
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:18 PM   #24
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The dimensions given at the RV Fridge Store (Dometic NDA1402 Sidewise Refrigerator - Factory New) show 26-1/16 inches thick. 29-5/8 might include the carboard box it comes in, for an overall shipping dimension.

You might squeeze some extra clearance by bringing it inside with the refrigerator doors off, as stated by azflycaster. In fact, even if you have enough clearance, I'd do that anyway, to minimize the chance of scratching up the doors in the process.
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Old 02-13-2012, 01:42 PM   #25
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Several posts have suggested adding more insulation to the exterior of a household refrigerator to improve it's efficiency. Be aware that many, but not all, smaller household refrigerators use the exterior case as the heat disposal method and must not be installed in an enclosed space (sides and top) and never insulated on the exterior. Only household refrigerators with coils on the back are suitable for replacement in an enclosed space.

Also, if you are looking for an efficient unit, look at he mandatory yellow energy "hang tag" on the one you are considering. If possible find one that has an energy use of 300 Kwh a year, or lower. Many are higher, much higher. Small does not mean energy efficient in many cases. I have seen dorm type little 20" cube units with hang tags showing higher energy use.
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Old 02-14-2012, 10:06 AM   #26
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I'm sorry, I should have mentioned that the measurements I got from Dometic, 29" +/- 1/8" were without the doors.
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Old 04-17-2012, 10:19 PM   #27
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[QUOTE=SmokelessJoe;1105121]Musicmaster,

If you’ve spent any amount of time on these forums you’ll know that you need to consider the difference between opinion and experience when shifting through the advice.

Many of the opinions given here so far are based on bias and conventional thinking and many of the points offered –about weight, resale, power draw, el cheapo renos, etc. – are just conjecture or plain wrong.

Whether you can use a 110 v. fridge depends mostly on how you plan to use the trailer. If you’re going to be mainly in the boonies then 110v is probably not so workable. I think you already knew that when you posted.

I opted for a small, very light, 8.6 cubic foot LG household fridge for my remodel. I’ve used it for 5 years without a hint of a problem.

The idea was put into my head by Andy Thompson, the long time Airstream dealer at London, Ontario, when he opined that a household fridge like this is a perfect size for trailer living and could easily be powered by a 1500 watt inverter.

His said it was well built but lighter than an RV fridge and cost 75% less. It could be repaired anywhere by pretty much anyone – no tricky LP or 12v systems. You could actually throw it out and get a new one if it ever broke down.

The fridge normally operates on shore power but when I am going overland for any serious amount of time, or dry-camped overnight, it operates perfectly off of my battery pack. QUOTE]



Hello Musicmaster,

On a previous moho, I had unsatisfactory cooling with the rv frig and put in a WHIRLPOOL, 9.6 CU FT stainless from Lowes, $450
http://www.lowes.com/pd_267488-46-ET0MSRXTQ_4294789497+4294789094_109_?productId=107 6489&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_qty _sales_dollar|1&pl=1¤tURL=%2Fpl_96_4294789497%2B42 94789094_109_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0|| p_product_qty_sales_dollar|1&facetInfo=9.6

Had to trim less than 1/2 inch from oak cabinet edge. Monitored its power consumption with a "Kill-a-watt" tool and never saw start-up power draw of more than 100 watts. Within 5-10 seconds it settled down to 30-45 watts. Forget the amp draw but it was so miniscule, I knew there was no worry of using it while on road and had plenty of battery storage for extended boondocking, if ever needed. Two good batteries in an AS should give plenty of run time.

One of the electrical wizards here could do the calculation watts/volts/amps to confirm the small amp draw.

I say put it in use it as you want. The first sign of trouble with my current Dometic in the AS...and its gone in favor of the Whirlpool. The stainless was instore and not online...at least locally.

Randy
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Old 04-18-2012, 12:32 PM   #28
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Thanks for the extra info, I'll check it out.
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