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Old 10-10-2013, 09:03 AM   #1
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Voltage in RV parks

Anyone had any issues with high voltage in RV parks? I've been to a few that had up to 136 volts and was wondering of the adverse affects on my rig.
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Old 10-10-2013, 09:11 AM   #2
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120v is a nominal value. All that's guaranteed is 60Hz frequency. National Electrical Code (NEC) calls for 120v ± 5%, which equates to a range of 114v to 126v average over the area supplied by the source. The closer you are to the power company substation, the higher it will be.

136v probably does no harm, except to protect you from the effects of brown-out during peak load times. Some cheap clocks and some electric motors might run a little fast on 136vAC, but…
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Old 10-10-2013, 09:19 AM   #3
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I have had problems with shore power being wired incorrectly. I carry a inexpensive polarity checker that I plug into the rv power post before I plug into shore power that diagnoses the most common problems.

You can also buy a surge protecter.
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Old 10-10-2013, 09:27 AM   #4
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120v is a nominal value.

The closer you are to the power company substation, the higher it will be.
No, the location of the sub station has nothing to do with it. The voltage is set at the local transformer (in my case on the pole serving my home). The transformers have various taps so they can be set close to the nominal 120 volts that is preferred, no matter how far from the substation which provides the higher distribution voltage.

Sorry, just a minor quibble.
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Old 10-10-2013, 09:28 AM   #5
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High voltage

I have a voltage regulator but it shuts me down anytime it exceeds 132 volts.
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Old 10-10-2013, 09:42 AM   #6
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Sorry, just a minor quibble.
No sweat. Appreciate the correction.
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:00 AM   #7
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I purchased one of these to monitor the voltage when using generator power.

It just plugs into an unused outlet.

However, I just leave it plugged in, and have developed the habit of checking it when on shore power just to make sure we are inputting an acceptable level.

They are cheap, but I did confirm it's accuracy with a good VOM meter.







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Old 10-10-2013, 10:17 AM   #8
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High voltage

Sorry but the question was " can high voltage damage my rig? "
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:27 AM   #9
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Yes, it can.

If it is overly high. Thus the suggestions to monitor it.

As mentioned above, anything over 5% above 120 volts, or 126 volts, is not in compliance with NEC.

And thus, probably beyond the design specifications of most appliances meant for use on 120 volt systems.


I would unplug it before it explodes in a great ball of fire. (just a joke)


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Old 10-10-2013, 10:31 AM   #10
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I took the prevailing consensus advice and bought surge protector to protect from high - low voltage and open neutral - cheap insurance arguably
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Old 10-10-2013, 10:44 AM   #11
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Old 10-10-2013, 11:04 AM   #12
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It is confusing though

I have heard ac called 110, 117, and 120. The transformer, is on my property, and my house is the only tap, gives me a consistent 122.
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Old 10-10-2013, 11:56 AM   #13
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Sorry but the question was " can high voltage damage my rig? "
In case you have not figured it out yet, asking a question on the forums is like the guy who went to the store for a quart of milk and came back with a puppy. ()
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Old 10-10-2013, 01:34 PM   #14
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On the high voltage question, I would not be happy to run that higher voltage for very long, as it would be tough on the converter/charger, any plug in stuff such as Televisions or microwaves, and so on. 136 volts is pretty darn high. I lived in a home with 126 to 128 volts all the time and had no problems, but it was on the upper edge of what I am comfortable with.

BTW the history of US voltage is interesting. Edison (who was using DC) needed a high voltage generator to push the current through his carbonized bamboo (and silk thread) filaments on his original incandescent lamp. The one they built in their shop came out as a 110 volt generator. It was a pure accident of their construction and windings. That is the origin of the 110 volt system here in this country. Edison then not only had to build the lamps, but the generating and distribution system to enable him to sell them. So, he made the bulbs (to operate on 110 volts) , and then built the electric companies too. The original Edison Electric DC power companies supplied 110 volt DC current, not AC. AC came along with Tesla and George Westinghouse. The superior distribution of AC power, using transformers, won out, but the voltage remained 110 volts for all lamps.

Edison also had to develop the metering system to pay for power, the screw socket to hold the bulb, and the switches to turn them on and off, as none were available or in use when the lamp was developed.

Over the years it was found that slightly higher voltages allowed the power companies to deliver more power on the same wires. The "standard" evolved from 110, to 112, to 115, to 117 to 120 where it is now. So, now, we have a 120/240 volt system which has been pretty much what has been used since about the early 1960's.

End of today's lecture....lol. Quiz on Monday.

As someone else posted + or - 5% is a reasonable deviation from the 120 volt standard, but over or under that, things start getting a bit iffy as to how the equipment connected works.
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