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Old 12-13-2014, 03:51 PM   #57
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I don't remember seeing it mentioned here yet, but an oddity to me was the time zone for Newfoundland. It is a half hour ahead of the Maritime provinces. It doesn't cause any problems that I can remember. It is just unusual - to me , anyhow!

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Old 12-13-2014, 08:59 PM   #58
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We are planning to go on the early caravan 2015 May-June. We have bikes and I generally take them with us unless there is little possibility they can be used. Would it be worth while to haul them up there?
No.....not many opportunities to bike....
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Old 12-14-2014, 11:48 AM   #59
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I don't remember seeing it mentioned here yet, but an oddity to me was the time zone for Newfoundland. It is a half hour ahead of the Maritime provinces. It doesn't cause any problems that I can remember. It is just unusual - to me , anyhow!

Dan
Don't worry, it's unusual to the rest of Canadians as well.
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Old 12-14-2014, 03:23 PM   #60
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Newfoundland time is 3 1/2 hours later than in Colorado. You lose time going there and gain it coming back. Your birthday will come sooner in Newfoundland and if you leave that day, you can have a longer birthday if you drive really, really fast. When in St. John's, you will be roughly 2,000 miles from Europe and we would be 4,000 miles from home. The furthest east you can go in Newfoundland is south east of St. John's. There are some WW II concrete bunkers there, never actually needed. I could not see Ireland from there, but it was cloudy. I don't recommend driving further east as Airstreams really don't float for long. You could try to snag an iceberg, but it will take you south and not east and will get smaller and smaller. Sometimes you'll see a small one ("bergybits" locally) and they may come to shore, but the big ones—as large as a good sized building—seemed to stay out to sea.

The weather in Newfoundland can be quite nasty. Rainy and windy and late snows are not unusual. Bring warm clothes and rain gear. It is like coastal New England, but worse. When we were there, they had a big storm in the east and by the time we got there, most had melted, but a highway worker strike meant supervisors did the plowing and it was not as good as normally. The telephone workers and some fishermen were also on strike, fairly normal for Canada. But the phones worked and the roads did get cleared well enough.

We didn't have a bug problem, but we were there pretty early. I imagine that like Alaska and northern Canada, some days you get them and other days you don't. I understand black flies can drive people nuts. We have them in the Colorado mountains too and they never have bothered me much. They will buzz in your ear and then you learn just how fast you can run (same for mosquitoes, but you just run into more of them). Neither of us have been bit by them, but others have.

Unlike the US, 4 lane highways are uncommon. You'll find them near large cities like Quebec and Montreal, but most of the TransCanada Hwy is 2- and sometimes 3-lanes. When we were there we experienced very little traffic, so it is not a big deal.

We took a ferry named after a famous Newfoundland premier, the guy who guided Newfoundland into Canada after WW II. I can't remember his name and the ferry appears to have been retired. It was an enormous ship and I think it held 2,500 passengers. It was pretty empty although the vehicle deck seemed packed. There were ice flows on the Bay of St. Lawrence—they were melting fast, so they posed no danger. We had a peaceful crossing both ways, but storms can come up and make the crossing nasty. They can also cause vehicles to dance around and cause damage to them. This doesn't happen often and Dramamine won't help them but a patch may help you. By the time we got off the ship, it was dark and we missed the exit for all the motels and drove and drove until we stopped at Stephensville late that evening and found a room. I have no idea where CG's are, but they must be somewhere. Traditionally people have camped in provincial gravel pits, but I don't know if that is still permitted.

After Stephenville, the next big town is Corner Brook. It is a good place to get provisions. There's an old hotel in town that is interesting to see and you can drive to the top of a big hill and see the entire area. One of things you will see on the harbor is a paper mill and the nasty stuff they dump in the water. I don't think pulling a trailer to the hotel or hill is a particularly good idea. After Corner Brook, the next big town is Gander and then St. John's. There are also a lot of trees and water. As said before, you have to drive off the TransCanada Hwy to see much of the province.

Gene
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Old 12-14-2014, 03:39 PM   #61
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Nice post, Gene. Here's your ferry guy:

Joey Smallwood - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-14-2014, 03:47 PM   #62
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Nice post, Gene. Here's your ferry guy:

Joey Smallwood - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aage,

That's him.

I see the ship was decommissioned in 2011. The Wikipedia entry has a mistake in that it says Newfoundland was a Dominion before 1949. My understanding it was a Dominion (like Canada) before the Great Depression, but the Depression was so devastating that the Dominion was broke and became a Crown Colony until they joined Canada as a province. Now Canada is called a Confederation.

For people not familiar with Canadian nomenclature, the chief executive of provinces and territories are premiers; the chief executive of the country is the prime minister. The national legislature is parliament, not sure on the provinces. I believe the national parliament has a House of Commons and a Senate. Senators are appointed and don't have much power. Districts for Commons are called Ridings. Another chance for Aage to educate me for whatever I got wrong.

My father was born in Canada although he left when he was one. That makes me half Canadian and must account for me liking Canada so much. I think I'm too old to apply for dual citizenship—I'm too late by 53 years. I also like red a lot.

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Old 12-14-2014, 05:49 PM   #63
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Gene, I don't believe that there was any change in the title that Newfoundland bore until Confederation. It was a Dominion, IMHO.

However (and perhaps this is what you are referring to), the following quote may clarify the issue for you:
By the 1920s and 1930s, Newfoundland was almost $40 million in debt, and on the verge of economic collapse. A commission recommended that Newfoundland should be "given a rest from party politics" and be administered by a special Commission of Government. Chaired by the governor it would consist of three people from Newfoundland and three from the United Kingdom. Backing the recommendation was the United Kingdom, who agreed to take on Newfoundland's debts. This commission of government began on February 16, 1934, and governed the island until it entered Canada in 1949.
One other point that I would add about how the Canadian political system differs from the US. While in the US there is a separate election for the President, here in Canada, the man or woman who is the head of his or her political party becomes the head of the Federal government (the Prime Minister) if that party commands a simple majority of the elected members.

My apologies for going so far off-topic!
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Old 12-14-2014, 05:57 PM   #64
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My apologies for going so far off-topic!
Talk to a mod about that, but knowing the country you are visiting is important.

I learned about the (perhaps) Crown Colony from information I read when we visited Newfoundland. Maybe it was a de facto Colony. What was interesting was that I didn't know it was independent of Canada for years.

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Old 12-14-2014, 06:48 PM   #65
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Newfoundland has an interesting history regarding its sovereignty, etc.. I'm almost finished with the book "Don't Tell The Newfoundlanders," which describes in detail how they got railroaded into confederation with Canada.

Long story short, and pardon any mis-naming of exact terms...they went into great financial despair during the depression and lost their self-governance, but were supposed to regain their (self) responsible government when they were financially sound.

Then, as they were becoming financially sound, England did not give them back their responsible government, and instead, Canada and England conspired to get them into confederation with Canada.

Canada wanted the natural resources in Labrador. Canada also did not want Newfoundland to join the USA, as some Newfoundlanders wanted to do.

Lots of lying and dealing behind closed doors, and voila...Canada got Newfoundland.

Class over...
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Old 12-15-2014, 12:56 PM   #66
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No matter where Newfoundland went, it costs the receiving nation money. The US has a lot of states that get much money from the federal government; Canada has some provinces in the same situation.

But, regardless, you can help by spending money there to help out the natives. A fascinating place with the friendliest people in North America. Maybe you can adopt a Newfie. And when you go and then return, you won't often meet other people who have been there.

Gene
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Old 12-15-2014, 01:46 PM   #67
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Not only won't you meet any or many people who have been there, you probably won't meet anyone who even knows where it is.
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Old 12-15-2014, 05:46 PM   #68
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Not only won't you meet any or many people who have been there, you probably won't meet anyone who even knows where it is.
And if they do, they've seen it on a map of the Atlantic Provinces where it is in an inset in the corner and looks about the same size as PEI.

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Old 12-16-2014, 08:07 AM   #69
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I am amused with this fine history and geography lesson. During the thirties most were in the same boat. With the prosperity that comes with offshore oil not to many will have to be adopted as this poor island is suffering about as much as Alberta. Btw Alberta is the second province from the west coast.
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Old 12-16-2014, 08:51 AM   #70
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I was wondering when someone from "The Great White North" and in particular...the true Eastern Canada (not Montreal as some think) would reply. That being said...this is why we all travel....to see, learn, and enjoy all that is out there!
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