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Old 09-11-2013, 10:38 PM   #15
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I pretty much agree with alan and Adam (post #4) except
I don't use cc and my tundra has daytime running lights.

Dan
Daytime running lights don't generally include taillights. Turn on your headlights so people behind can see you before they hit you. Especially when towing a silver trailer that turns to dull gray (nearly invisible) in the rain.

Of course, when I'm towing I always have my headlights on anyway, regardless of the weather or time of day, just on general principles.
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:27 AM   #16
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No matter what I am driving or when I always have the headlights on. There are some folks around these parts that won't turn their headlights on till they can't see. They don't understand the headlights are so others can see you not so you can see. Silver and dark colored cars disappear under some lighting conditions but these are the most popular colors even on motorcycles which are impossible to see anyway. I still have not figured out why people that live in the south buy black cars because of the heat.

Perry
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:58 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
Daytime running lights don't generally include taillights. Turn on your headlights so people behind can see you before they hit you. Especially when towing a silver trailer that turns to dull gray (nearly invisible) in the rain.

Of course, when I'm towing I always have my headlights on anyway, regardless of the weather or time of day, just on general principles.
Good point. I will make sure that I turn my headlights on in the rain.

Dan
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Old 09-12-2013, 07:02 AM   #18
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If you're thinking about a friction sway, we discussed those recommendations in this thread. I wasn't thoroughly convinced by the explanations, but they're in there. The basic premise is that a friction sway only resists movement; it doesn't try to push the trailer back in line to straight.

I haven't loosened mine in the rain. I'd have to stop to do it, then stop again after the rain to tighten it again. And I'm more concerned about sway from a passing vehicle or something like that in the rain than not - I might slow down, depending on conditions, but it's pretty much guaranteed at least some people won't.

I don't go as slow as possible in the rain; I pick a moderate pace that still gives me good traction and all, and try not to be an impediment to traffic. I have my headlights on when towing anyway, even in good weather. I want people to know where to look for brake lights.
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Old 09-12-2013, 07:34 AM   #19
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I like our cam anti-sway. No worries about what happens in the rain, snow, or ice.

I slow down enough to be comfortable, but certainly not enough to require the use of flashers.

I suppose my position is this:

Being comfortable towing a trailer comes with experience.

If one has been exposed to towing lots of trailers in varying conditions, one is more comfortable doing so.

If one purchases a trailer, loads all their possessions, and is learning as they go, one will no doubt be apprehensive in less than ideal conditions. For a while.

Trailers are not spooky horses, looking for a way to blow up and unload the rider at anytime.

We brag about how well behaved Airstreams are compared to SOBs, so enjoy the day, slow down a little to allow yourself a little extra time to stop when in traffic and drive until cocktail hour.

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Old 09-12-2013, 07:39 AM   #20
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I should have said......

I go as slow as traffic will allow in the rain. I just don't like towing in the rain.
Last week, one of my camping crew, who lives in the same town as me, broke camp and left before the rain. I was about to leave when the weather got very nasty. His motorhome was getting blown all over and couldn't see his nose. He had to pull over, and wait it out. I spent some quality time with the dog and my mandolin, safe and sound. He made fun of me at first, then realized that we got home about the same time. Had I left with him, the dog and I would have had to get soaked to be in the camper, and I would have been a sitting duck on the side of I 295.
Today I am leaving for a mountaintop weekend. A two mile dirt road up to the top. Reports call for thunder storms. I am worried about traction and getting stuck half way up, and I have to ford a tiny creek. I should be more worried about the crazies on the highway.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:34 AM   #21
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Trailers are not spooky horses, looking for a way to blow up and unload the rider at anytime.
Good point. I was just saying to my wife on a recent trip that you get to the point with towing that you realize the trailer is simply going to follow you. On the interstate, the only thing you have to watch is the longer length while merging, but if you keep the truck between the lines, the trailer will do the same.
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Old 09-12-2013, 08:46 AM   #22
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Friction sway control manufacturers, all recommend that their friction sway control be loosen or taken off when towing in the rain.

Water is a lubricant to the friction pads, which renders them useless, the same as the shoe brakes on tow vehicles do when getting wet.

Andy
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:32 AM   #23
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Friction sway control manufacturers, all recommend that their friction sway control be loosen or taken off when towing in the rain.

Water is a lubricant to the friction pads, which renders them useless, the same as the shoe brakes on tow vehicles do when getting wet.

Andy
So... Is there a detrimental effect? I agree that wet friction pads are not as effective, but I am missing how it would be harmful to leave them tightened or connected.
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:43 AM   #24
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I thought when making a turn or steering correction or the road, the friction sway control resists returning to a straight line. So because of the reduced tire traction on the wet roadway, you could lose control of the rig.

doug
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Old 09-12-2013, 09:57 AM   #25
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So... Is there a detrimental effect? I agree that wet friction pads are not as effective, but I am missing how it would be harmful to leave them tightened or connected.
It can cause loss of control, unless loosened.

Andy
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Old 09-12-2013, 11:45 AM   #26
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It can cause loss of control, unless loosened.

Andy
Andy, I have the Reese Weight Distribution with sway control I bought from you. Is there a way to loosen the sway without changing the weight distribution? Or is this setup not an issue?
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Old 09-12-2013, 11:49 AM   #27
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Andy, I have the Reese Weight Distribution with sway control I bought from you. Is there a way to loosen the sway without changing the weight distribution? Or is this setup not an issue?
There is no need to loosen anything when using a Reese "dual cam" sway control.

Andy
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Old 09-12-2013, 01:04 PM   #28
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Quote: "Friction sway control manufacturers, all recommend that their friction sway control be loosen or taken off when towing in the rain. Water is a lubricant to the friction pads, which renders them useless, the same as the shoe brakes on tow vehicles do when getting wet."

This seems contradictory. If water lubricates the friction pads and renders them useless, then why bother to loosen them in the rain?

Also, cars (and trailers) should not be driven in the rain because the brakes get wet?

Wow.
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