Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-13-2009, 12:45 PM   #43
Rivet Master
 
1984 31' Excella
Norfolk , Virginia
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 667
Images: 11
Programs

Try this view on for size:
The states are cutting the budget in areas that are used by people who can afford to pay for the freebie. If you look carefully you will find that the programs that receive the smallest, if any cuts are those that amount to welfare. Politicians have realized that the people who put them in office are the "underdog voting blocks" so they cater to these blocks. Literal translation: buying the next election. Regan did it with the firing of the Air Traffic Controllers. They were replaced with those that were not in the "majority" at that point in time. I was at the Mike Monroney Aeronautical Academy at a technician’s school when the first three classes of replacements arrived. Regan won the next election.
Those of us who are independent thinkers, who don't tend to vote in blocks are going to continue to loose control over the budgets and government due to the fact that we vote “all over the map” thus negating our power and appeal to those running for elected positions.
Take Mark Warner for instance, when he was elected Governor of VA the state was in “dire straits”, according to him. To cut back and save money he immediately closed Division of Motor Vehicle offices that were in districts that voted for the other guy.
The department that builds highways here have such quality people making decisions that we can't even get interstates built that won't pool water.
Maintenance.....
Hurricand Isabel flodded the Midtown tunnel because the locking hole cover for the flood gate stob had been welded in place AND it had been so long since any maintenance/testing had been performed the tunnel flooded.
Just last week the Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel West bound tube flodded for the same reasons. A maintenance worker stated on a TV interview that it had been 5 years since he has seen the pertinant pumps even turned on to check to see if they still worked.
You want to make a difference, simply email or write your representative repeatedly telling him what you want him to do. He works for you.
Get several friends to do the same.
Beginner
__________________

__________________
Beginner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2009, 01:20 PM   #44
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
This thread has evolved from one about rest stops to the entire transportation system and its history. Freshair's post about the '50's made me try to remember how we travelled back then. I don't remember any rest stops except on turnpikes. The first ones I remember where on the NJ Turnpike and they all seemed to be Howard Johnson's. There was a gas station with higher prices than anywhere else. After slowly getting through NYC, we'd need a bathroom break at HoJo's and get gas on US 1 in Delaware or Maryland. All the other states followed NJ's example (probably actually pioneered by the Pa. Tnpk. which was started before WW II). There were few 4 lane highways in those days except for the NE. Most traveling was on two laners which meant following 18 wheelers for miles looking for a safe place to pass, and then after a mile or so, ending up behind another truck.

On a trip west in 1959, after traveling the midwest turnpikes to Chicago, it was US 30 west. There was less and less traffic, fewer trucks, endless corn and wheat fields, and eventually mountains with 10 mile grades. I had a license by then and my father would let me drive in the morning (he felt it was safer) and I could go 75 mph. What freedom! Rest stops—I don't remember any.

We'd stop for meals and at a Stuckey's in between a lot of the time. Bathroom, candy (chocolate covered pecans) and my mother could look at thousands of cheap earrings. Otherwise, we'd just drive and drive, but in the more populated parts of the country, driving close to 400 miles in a day was a chore with traffic and two lane roads.

Eisenhower's genius in pushing the interstate system was promoting it as a defense system to sell it to Congress. He had been impressed with Germany's autobahns and realized that the US needed a modern system and that the US was becoming auto and truck based for transport. The slow collapse of the rail system made good highways an imperative. Even going back further, when the automobile was beginning to become popular, America's road system was nearly nonexistent. Dirt roads and mud were the rural roads. The AAA and other auto clubs became lobbyists for a road system and I think it was the AAA that began numbering roads and putting those numbers on them. Maps were poor or nonexistent and interstate travel was difficult. People trying to drive crosscountry in the early 20th century, besides having many tools, axles, tires and extra fuel, sometimes had to drive across fields in the west. We had a pretty effective intercity trolley system up until the 1920's, but autos started to dominate. Small towns had been connected by a far larger rail system than we have now. If GM and others had not promoted roads over rail, it still would have happened. The open road meant freedom of movement for Americans. Through our history, we have moved—averaging 20% of people move each year.

As a country we are dependent on a good highway system. That's not going to change. Changes will be slow and require massive amounts of investment. Improved freight and passenger rail, improved fuel economy everywhere, alternative propulsion systems. Arguments how to pay for it will never stop. Fees, taxes, private vs. public investment all are involved. The things that benefit the entire society usually get paid for by public investment. If tolls and fees finance roads, we all pay it anyway though that tends to weigh most heavily on those with the least disposable income. In many countries the rail system is gov't owned and supported—those are the countries with the best rail systems. If they can do it, why can't we? Is the US gov't more corrupt than other industrialized countries?

As for rest stops, we all agree they are a necessary thing. The best thing is to complain to state governors and legislators.

Gene
__________________

__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2009, 03:00 PM   #45
Rivet Master
 
Mikethefixit's Avatar
 
1977 27' Overlander
Trotwood , Ohio
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 2,153
Send a message via Yahoo to Mikethefixit
News Flash
The State of Ohio has discontinued trash collection for all state parks.If you go in to use a state park facility you have to take your own trash bags. YOU CARRY IN YOU CARRY OUT.is their slogan.
This does not apply to those area's used by campers. Trash collection will still be provided.
I have not heard of any rest area's being closed but I suppose that's next.
__________________
Roger & MaryLou
___________________
F350 CREWCAB SW LONG BED
7.3 liter Power Stroke Diesel
1977 27ft OVERLANDER
KA8LMQ
AIR # 22336 TAC- OH-7
May your roads be straight and smooth and may you always have a tailwind!
Mikethefixit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2009, 04:28 PM   #46
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Last week we stopped at a small rest stop along the Rio Grande in NM. The trash contained (just a 55 gallon barrel with no top) was overflowing and trash was all over the ground. Cutbacks? Sloppiness? Don't know, but NM does have a lot of small rest stops and we appreciate that.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2009, 04:58 PM   #47
Rivet Master
 
SilverRanger's Avatar
 
2005 19' Safari
1968 24' Tradewind
Rural , Delaware
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikethefixit View Post
News Flash
The State of Ohio has discontinued trash collection for all state parks.If you go in to use a state park facility you have to take your own trash bags. YOU CARRY IN YOU CARRY OUT.is their slogan.
This does not apply to those area's used by campers. Trash collection will still be provided.
Mike,
Delaware State Parks (for whom I worked for for 30+ years) did the exact same thing several years ago (except we provided the bags). I'll admit, at first I was skeptical but after the first year (learning curve for the public and staff), it actually worked and saved the taxpayers a significant amount of revenue. I realized it would be inconvenient for the customers and, from an enforcement perspective, I anticipated an increase in littering and dumping. There was some, but it leveled off as people became educated.

That being said, I'm concerned about the closing of rest stops. After a little one hour nap, I'm usually good for 6-7 more hours of driving time.
__________________
2005 Bambi
1968 Trade Wind
2007 Ford F250 4x4 Crew
WDCU
SilverRanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-13-2009, 10:41 PM   #48
2 Rivet Member
 
SilverAvion's Avatar
 
Freeport , Maine
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 65
Images: 1
where is the money for the rest stops? in these economic times, hard decisions are being made. choices between emergency services, education, and dollars to promote tourism are all being looked at. frankly, it is easier for local politics to cut funding which is seen as benefiting transient tourism, rather than the local fire department.
is it short sighted? yes. but its also a reality.

perhaps more states should look at toll roads as a way to maintain facilities for travelers. a use tax on travelers and commerce is easier to stomach for local politics, and fair as well.
__________________
SilverAvion is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2009, 08:35 AM   #49
Rivet Master
 
richinny's Avatar
 
2011 34' Classic
Westchester Cty.NY , / Miami FL
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 3,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverAvion View Post
perhaps more states should look at toll roads as a way to maintain facilities for travelers. a use tax on travelers and commerce is easier to stomach for local politics, and fair as well.
tourism is big business. if you discourage tourism tax revenues lost from that industry will outweigh any tolls collected on the highways. unless you have a totally electronic way of collecting tolls, they are a poor choice for collecting money. maybe something as simple as donation boxes would go a long way.
__________________
Ricky
2012 F150 Super Crew 5-1/2' bed Ecoboost 4x4 3.73 elec. lock diff. Propride hitch
give life. kidney & pancreas transplant 9/9/06
Ingrid-my unofficial '"World's Oldest Streamer" 1909-2008 R.I.P.
richinny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2009, 09:56 AM   #50
Rivet Master
 
SARGE/AF's Avatar
 
1996 34' Limited
1976 31' Sovereign
1983 31' Excella
Greeneville , Tennessee
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 516
Images: 2
I agree with GeneEd, this post has grown, I also too was thinking back when I was younger because we did so much traveling and to think of it I really dont remember that many rest areas. There was however Howard Johnsons, Skellys, along with many resturant chains that had a place to pull into just about every 10 miles for trucks & campers/travelers, but those days of places like that are gone.
But in all the posts here I keep seeing the same thing, we as travelers need to start calling, writing, all politicians to keep areas open and available for use during travels. At the same time suggestions should be made on how to keep these areas funded without the cost resting completely on only a few, namely persons of a county being taxed to maintain that area(s) when it is used by the national population.

Sarge
__________________
SARGE/AF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2009, 10:17 AM   #51
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Something in Sarge's post reminded me how little rest stops in small towns seem to be harder to find. Sometimes it's at a park along the highway, or in a really small town, a few picnic tables and an outhouse in a few hundred square feet near the town road junction.

Then there's the small town free RV stop—a dump station and a place for a few RV's to overnight. Paonia, Colo., had one until last year until they decided to use the land for a new library and they didn't replace the RV facility. Delta, Colo., has a dump station that would be hard to use for anything but a Class C; it's part of a parking lot and probably once was big enough for a few overnighters. Neither of these are (or were) easy to find.

Maybe the formal rest stop on interstates grew out of these small town rest and RV stops. Once a limited access highway was built, no one saw the small town ones, and once people had less need for the small town ones, they tend to disappear. They even disappear in my county which doesn't have an interstate. Things we used to take for granted as a service to the public now seem to disappear, become commercialized, or have fees and more fees. Didn't most state parks have no fees not long ago? Now it costs more to reserve an RV site than the entrance fee to the park.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2009, 09:04 PM   #52
Rivet Master
 
SilverRanger's Avatar
 
2005 19' Safari
1968 24' Tradewind
Rural , Delaware
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,475
"Didn't most state parks have no fees not long ago?"

Our state parks have been charging fees as long as I can remember. I haven't looked at recent demographics, but our largest parks located near the coast are heavily used by non-residents. The money goes toward maintenance and improvements. The entire park system is between 65-70% self supporting, with the remainder coming from the resident taxpayers (no sales tax in Delaware). Compared to nearby private campgrounds, the fees are very reasonable. In some cases, less than half of what they charge.

On a recent trip to the south, other than catnaps at a rest stop and a Flying J, we stayed exclusively at state parks. All were top notch and reasonable, costing between $14-$18 per night for full hookups. We also scouted some private campgrounds, and in terms of aesthetics, quietness and cleanliness, they just didn't compare. From now on, whenever possible, it's state parks for us.
__________________
2005 Bambi
1968 Trade Wind
2007 Ford F250 4x4 Crew
WDCU
SilverRanger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2009, 06:51 AM   #53
Rivet Master
 
SARGE/AF's Avatar
 
1996 34' Limited
1976 31' Sovereign
1983 31' Excella
Greeneville , Tennessee
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 516
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrawfordGene View Post
Something in Sarge's post reminded me how little rest stops in small towns seem to be harder to find. Sometimes it's at a park along the highway, or in a really small town, a few picnic tables and an outhouse in a few hundred square feet near the town road junction.

Then there's the small town free RV stop—a dump station and a place for a few RV's to overnight. Paonia, Colo., had one until last year until they decided to use the land for a new library and they didn't replace the RV facility. Delta, Colo., has a dump station that would be hard to use for anything but a Class C; it's part of a parking lot and probably once was big enough for a few overnighters. Neither of these are (or were) easy to find.

Maybe the formal rest stop on interstates grew out of these small town rest and RV stops. Once a limited access highway was built, no one saw the small town ones, and once people had less need for the small town ones, they tend to disappear. They even disappear in my county which doesn't have an interstate. Things we used to take for granted as a service to the public now seem to disappear, become commercialized, or have fees and more fees. Didn't most state parks have no fees not long ago? Now it costs more to reserve an RV site than the entrance fee to the park.

Gene
Your dead on Gene with the rest stops, but I also remember that these small towns also took care of these pit stops and there was always some small & Pop business having something there, coffee, sandwiches, drinks, nothing major. I remember that dad would not unpack anything, it was either the snacks we carried in the truck and when we afford it you got to buy 1 drink and sometimes a sandwich. I worked at mowing lawns and my sister did babysitting to help pay for the trips and extras (mostly extras).
In my 22 years of driving truck and 2 million miles I stayed in rest stops mostly and carriered food with me first in a cooler with ice then when they came out with the 12V coolers. Most of us old time drivers did just to avoid the truck/tourist stops poor food and high prices especially after about the mid 90's.
The state parks did not used to be a place you wanted to stop poor maintaince, lack of services, but the last 10 years or so they have much improved and now they are actually just as nice or better than private parks and they dont violate your constitutional rights by telling you how many kids you can have.

Sarge
__________________
SARGE/AF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2009, 06:53 AM   #54
Rivet Master
 
SARGE/AF's Avatar
 
1996 34' Limited
1976 31' Sovereign
1983 31' Excella
Greeneville , Tennessee
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 516
Images: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverRanger View Post
"Didn't most state parks have no fees not long ago?"

Our state parks have been charging fees as long as I can remember. I haven't looked at recent demographics, but our largest parks located near the coast are heavily used by non-residents. The money goes toward maintenance and improvements. The entire park system is between 65-70% self supporting, with the remainder coming from the resident taxpayers (no sales tax in Delaware). Compared to nearby private campgrounds, the fees are very reasonable. In some cases, less than half of what they charge.

On a recent trip to the south, other than catnaps at a rest stop and a Flying J, we stayed exclusively at state parks. All were top notch and reasonable, costing between $14-$18 per night for full hookups. We also scouted some private campgrounds, and in terms of aesthetics, quietness and cleanliness, they just didn't compare. From now on, whenever possible, it's state parks for us.
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXX

The state parks did not used to be a place you wanted to stop poor maintaince, lack of services, but the last 10 years or so they have much improved and now they are actually just as nice or better than private parks and they dont violate your constitutional rights by telling you how many kids you can have. We like to use state parks as much as possible too.

Sarge
__________________
SARGE/AF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2009, 07:44 AM   #55
Rivet Master
 
codybear's Avatar
 
1964 22' Safari
SACRAMENTO , California
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,562
Images: 315
Blog Entries: 2
Hi,
We're on the road to N.Y. and have had good luck with all of the rest stops we've visited w/our safari including: CA, NV, AZ, NM, all through Texas: Amarillo, Odessa, Junction, Corpus Christi, Mt. Pleasant, Little Rock, AK, and here in Tennessee. clean facilities.
__________________
codybear is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2009, 07:35 PM   #56
Rivet Master

 
Southwestern , Ohio
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,669
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverRanger View Post
On a recent trip to the south, other than catnaps at a rest stop and a Flying J, we stayed exclusively at state parks. All were top notch and reasonable, costing between $14-$18 per night for full hookups. We also scouted some private campgrounds, and in terms of aesthetics, quietness and cleanliness, they just didn't compare. From now on, whenever possible, it's state parks for us.
This may be true in the south, but in the upper midwest--Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota, for example, state parks are not economically attractive for a one-night stay. The reason being that in addition to $20-25 for a water-and-electric or electric-only camp site you have to pay $10 or $15 each day for a non-resident vehicle permit just to get into the park. Bringing the total to $30 - $40 for a one-night stay, more than nearby private campgrounds.

For a longer stay you may want the state park for its surroundings, in which case the fees may be worth it. In some states you can also buy an annual vehicle permit for $40-50 which may pay for a longer stay.

Actually, in the states I mentioned, we have found that the best deals in price and ambiance are numerous municipal and county parks, which typically run $15 a night for a tree-shaded water and electric spot--some right on a lake--with no additional vehicle pass fees.

And speaking of small towns--we took US 2 back to Minnesota from Bozeman and Glacier NP last year, a thousand miles or so of two lane road, and had a ball. It seems like every little town had a town rest area or park right on the highway. As a rule they had nice rest rooms, picnic tables, and many had dump stations. All for free. I don't know who maintained them--the local chamber of commerce, I suspect--but we sure appreciated them. And we went out of our way to buy gas, food, or groceries in town to help in some small way to make their hospitality pay off.
__________________

__________________
Nuvite-F is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Save money By Buying an older AS purman General Repair Forum 19 06-17-2009 07:53 PM
Be on the alert at Florida rest-stops !! Paul Ouellette On The Road... 12 12-21-2007 01:36 PM
Rest Stops janetb On The Road... 16 11-22-2007 09:37 AM
Rest Stops Minnie's Mate On The Road... 32 02-13-2007 08:26 PM
sleeping at rest stops Tin Hut Our Community 23 08-26-2003 11:12 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:58 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.