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Old 01-20-2014, 07:00 PM   #29
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You wiil miss another good historical stop if you bypass Ft MacLeod. It is not a busy city and has lots of parking and easy to get around.


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Uncle Bill here again with another quick question...I am still planning on my trip to Alaska by entering Canada thru Montana, passing thru Lethbridge. I have seen with Google that I can make a by-pass around Fort MacLeod by taking RT 23 north and then turning on RT 519 west until I come back to RT 2. Is this a good idea? And, then my next question is about Calgary. I want to get onto RT1 west in that area heading for Lake Louise. Is there a good by-pass around Calgary to avoid potential traffic?
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Old 01-20-2014, 11:39 PM   #30
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We also want to do it all, flightseeing, boat trips, ferry to Juneau, etc. We will probably drive both ways. We have lots of time May 15 to maybe mid Aug.

I really appreciate all the advice and suggestions every one has. The more I read on AirForums and the MilePost the more excited I get.
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Old 02-02-2014, 08:57 PM   #31
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Happy Camper on the Alaska Highway

We reside in Anchorage, have made the trip for both work and pleasure. Traveled roads on the east and west side of the Rockies and have made the trip in winter and summer season. Its a long ride, some tiring stretches, occasional road repairs w/seasonal weather blockages, minor mechanical problems like tire flats, occasional rain, cool evenings, animals on the road, flying gravel in places, and some concerns about finding fuel in remote spots. Minor headaches.

Beautiful, gorgeous. Two words you'll utter someplace along this stretch of road. You might also say something like "will we ever get there".

Preferences: For me, the west side of the Canadian Rockies offered the best camping experiences, scenery and contact with the local culture. The roads on the east side of the Rockies are familiar, easy to travel high speed highways from Great Falls to Edmonton/Whitecourt BC. The scenery is mostly of the prairie. Eastern Montana I found to be about the same....windy. These areas are populated by diverse people, very nice people. All of whom I initially thought suffered from a similar disability.... having one leg shorter that the other. I came to realize that it's symptomatic of their climate, that is, having to perpetually lean into the wind.

Plan on seeing BC, it will take time. BC's huge, beautiful and offers awesome camping. On the west side of the Rockies you can head north in BC via several routes of which the Kootenay Lake valley, the Osoyoos/Penticton/Kelowna area (awesome wine and fruit country) and Frasier Valley routes are all my preferences..each special, unique.

If you can make the time to take the ride (long ride) over the Chilcotin area from Williams Lake to Bella Coola, worth every minute.

Eventually, anyway that you decide to go north west of the Rockies, you'll make it to bustling Prince George. I recommend that you keep your eyes straight forward and bypass the Prince. At Prince George you'll have to decide to head over the Yellowhead hwy to Smithers and up the Stewart/Cassiar Hwy or head straight up the John Hart Hwy from P.George to Dawson then on to Whitehorse via the Alaska Hwy.

Beautiful country, acceptable paved roads either way but I would make sure that you try both routes during the round trip.

The are many beautiful sites between Dawson and Whitehorse including Toad River, Muncho Lake, and Liard Hot Springs. Near Liard is buffalo country and often they're right in the middle of the road. It may be hard to believe, you'll probably think I'm nuts, but in early spring or late fall and through our northern winter nights (even as big as they are) its difficult to impossible to see a buffalo standing in the middle of the road. Remember, I warned you.

I thought the Cassiar route to be the most interesting to me. However, in terms of topography, scenery, wildlife, and people both routes from Prince George to Alaska are worthy.

Via the Cassiar route you can turn off and visit both Prince Rupert and Stewart on side trips.

The BC provincial parks are excellent. I suggest you camp at the Meziadin Lake Campground (beautiful), drop your camper and drive down to Stewart (check your fuel in Stewart) and Hyder for a day trip. On your way to the Alaska Hwy from Meziadin be sure stay at the Boya Lake campground, too. North of Boya you might see some small camps of morel mushroom hunters.

I cannot think of any real negatives about the trip to or from Alaska. Yes, their will be some gravel and wash board roadway, some (several/numerous) road repair construction crews, and the stretch of road between Kluane Lake and Tok is usually a frost heave carnival ride. Plan on 35mph for about 225 miles and then, just when you think the frost heaves are all over and you're just touching 50 mph, you'll see a little orange flag on a piece of wire along side the road. About thirty seconds later your head will hit the ceiling of your cab and you will have bitten your tongue.

Mosquitoes? What mosquitoes? If you are dying to see mosquitoes stop into Pine Lake to camp during a warm weekend. Pine Lake is just before Haines Junction, but be sure to come packing.....you'll need an extra quart of blood.

Since the Alaska Hwy was opened there have been a few (quite a few) Canadians making a good living off of the travelers on the road. These people can come in very handy when needed. They're very nice people but I just wish they weren't so happy when you show up in some remote location with a strange noise in your engine or a thumping tire to fix. If you need help ask, they are very good at towing, repairing and obtaining parts. You may discover, however, that the company towing you owns the only repair shop, is part owner of the local restaurant, the parts house, the wrecking yard, the local lodge, and the town's taxi service and the meter's running.

Make sure you're a member of the best insurance plan Good Sam has to offer, and carry a selection of plastic....don't leave home without it. All Canadians on the Alaska Hwy can convert the US dollar to the Canadian dollar and make change faster than you can choke out, "Your Welcome".

Whitehorse,.... ho hum. Its worth the stop, kinda. It's the center of all in that area and during the summer it is busy. And crowded. And dusty. I say fuel up, load up, have a pizza night, and then head north for the border.

The border is no problem. If you're just traveling through Canada to Alaska don't try to bring bear spray into Canada, they'll confiscate it. Forget the shot guns with bear slugs, you don't need it. If your going out into the bush, on some long remote trip near salmon streams you might want to send a long firearm ahead or have the paperwork completed and fee paid "before". Be prepared to be inspected at the border by authorities. Your pets should have their recent health certificates, but I've never been asked for ours.

Here's a guide that offers some good ideas as you approach Alaska and the border: travelalaska.com

Warning: One of the nasty little head irritations with Alaska roads is the state's practice of repairing roads by oiling/graveling and leaving a mess. Some times a small pool of oil collects and guess who's AS is going to be spackled end to end. It happened once to me. Guess what? Every store in Tok seemed to have cases of pricey tar remover. After two hours or so we were back on the road. Hands smelling a bit like solvent, soap and hydrocarbons. Just saying, watch out for it, drive slower on freshly graveled roads in Alaska, don't haul butt around some other slow moving vehicle, don't pass on bridges to make up time, (or stop on bridges to check out the scenery) and don't be surprised if someone in Alaska calls you on it if you do. Don't get me wrong, its Alaska drivers I'm warning you about.

Alaska may have the worst drivers in north America. They will pass you on a hill, on a curve, on a bridge, across double yellow lines, doing in excess of the speed limit, with cell phone in ear, all while driving a camper and pulling a boat and fish nest blowing in the breeze. Just to get to a fishing hole or a campground as soon as possible. Its weird, stupid. Watch out for stupid. Sometimes, its head shaking unbelievable.

On some Alaska roads they have a posted rule that says something like: "You must pull over if blocking five or more cars". Its the sign right next to "Headlights must be on at all times" sign.

Now pay attention, I'm talking to you:

I love checking out the Alaska scenery, its always different. You will want to check it out, too. You're on your vacation and you'll want to look at the scenery not haul on past. I understand. But, when rubber necking, you'll probably slow down a little (maybe drift a little toward the mid-line) and vehicles will immediately start stacking up behind you. You look behind, see about five cars, and remembering the "rules of the road" you'll decide to speed up. Bad choice.

Now, you might think to yourself that the speed limit is just the upper limit and your right. Furthermore, it isn't Alaska law that you are required to travel at the maximum speed, right again. Unfortunately, more often than not, the fifth vehicle will be the one mentioned above, the one towing the boat. Impatient, tired, irritated...foot to the floor, here he comes in your mirror.

Please pay attention to the rules of the road, even if the Alaska driver doesn't. On the sections of Alaska highway posted 'to pull over when holding up traffic' be assured that there is a very good reason the state posted that warning on that particular section of road. They have statistics to back it up, please don't end up being a statistic.

OK, Ok, enough with the "heads up" warnings, already.

Most of Alaska is a beautiful, scenic place. It's not for everybody but I love it here. You'll find BC, the Yukon and Alaska intriguing, a bit sparse in places, on the wilder side. Bring a sweater, light gloves, and a hat, even in summer.

Have a good trip, maybe we'll cross paths. We're pulling a Safari, wishing the best.
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Old 02-02-2014, 09:53 PM   #32
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Outstanding post! Thank you for that. Many times I've driven to Smithers, BC, but not further. Someday I will.
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Old 02-02-2014, 10:34 PM   #33
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Hi, on my trip to Alaska, two years ago, I was told by two border guards that you can bring Bear Spray, but no guns and no pepper spray.
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Old 02-02-2014, 11:48 PM   #34
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Lots of really good advice, thank you. We have spent time in Prince George and Prince Rupert a couple of years ago but never north of there. We are sort of leaning toward going up the Cassiar/Stewart Hwy and then returning down through Prince George. The more we read and hear about the adventures of other Airstreamers the more excited we get. We will be leaving our home, Olympia, approx May 15 or even a few days earlier.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:07 PM   #35
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WOW, Great Information

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Originally Posted by kcbwil View Post
We reside in Anchorage, have made the trip for both work and pleasure. Traveled roads on the east and west side of the Rockies and have made the trip in winter and summer season. Its a long ride, some tiring stretches, occasional road repairs w/seasonal weather blockages, minor mechanical problems like tire flats, occasional rain, cool evenings, animals on the road, flying gravel in places, and some concerns about finding fuel in remote spots. Minor headaches.

Beautiful, gorgeous. Two words you'll utter someplace along this stretch of road. You might also say something like "will we ever get there".
My wife and I are planning the big trip this summer, June - August. I appreciate all the info you provided, but I have one more request....Not wanting to drive with a lot of back-tracking we would like to have a good plan on big steps to sight-see from. Our rough route would take us from Tok to Homer, then Homer thru Anchorage and Denali to Fairbanks, next from Fairbanks back to Tok. On the way back to Canada a side trip from Whitehorse down to Skagway. I have not seen any posting or writing about this level of travel in Alaska. We have not decided whether or not to go via Chicken thru Dawson City and then down to Whitehorse. That most likely will be decided based on the weather at the time we get back to Tok. Thanks again for all the good info.....Uncle Bill
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:24 PM   #36
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Hi, on my trip to Alaska, two years ago, I was told by two border guards that you can bring Bear Spray, but no guns and no pepper spray.
You can actually take a long gun thru Canada. We took a shotgun with us on our last trip. You cannot take handguns.

You do have to fill out the paperwork, and pay the $25 fee (that's really what they are after), and the key word to use for the reason for taking the gun is you are "transporting" it to Alaska, and back.

They did ask me where the gun was located, and if it was loaded, but they never looked at it. You will need the paperwork to get into Alaska with the gun (don't ask me how they knew, but they did), and again when you come back thru Canada.

After the fact, and having done it, it's really not worth the trouble. If you are going to do it, it's much better to get the form on the net and have it filled out before you get to the border as it will save you lots of time.
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Old 02-04-2014, 01:25 PM   #37
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Dear Uncle Bill,

The trip you planning is what I think many road tourists take.....similar to distances in BC and the Yukon, its a lengthy prospect between any two points in Alaska. I think the major difference between the Alcan travelers is that some come to Alaska principally to fish then there's everyone else. If you want to fish and you would like some help or background try: Alaska Outdoors Forums
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Alaska Private Anglers Fishing Reports for Alaska King, Silver, and Sockeye Salmon, Alaska Pacific Halibut, Lingcod & Rainbow Trout, Arctic Grayling, and Arctic char.

If your in Alaska to sport fish and your driving, you'll probably be after salmon or halibut which will cause you to spend most of your time near the coastal areas. Which means Valdez, Seward, Deep Creek/Anchor Point, (Kenai Peninsula) and Homer, even Kodiak via ferry. I know of travelers that spend their entire Alaska summer on the Kenai Peninsula roadway, following the fish runs ....and have been doing it for years in a row.

You will be back tracking between Homer and Anchorage. As a point of reference its about the same distance (in terms of time on the road) to drive Sterling-Homer as it is Sterling-Seward. When we travel Anc-Homer its a 5 hour drive for us. We prefer to break up the drive and avoid hwy traffic by leaving early (by noon if possible) and on the way, stopping at one of the campgrounds for the night. Other than on the major holidays, you can just about always find a good campground spot for the evening. That's excluding the campgrounds that sit right on the Kenai, or Kasilof Russian Rivers in the middle of the sockeye run. Do yourself a favor, don't get caught on a Friday afternoon driving through Anchorage and fighting the hwy traffic south (or north) in the evening rush hour period. Its a grind on Friday afternoons and the later it is in the day the more hectic it gets.

In mid-July, the sockeyes are running. People all over south central load up there dip nets and fishing poles and drive, non-stop to the Kenai area (or north to the the Copper River) fish for hours straight thru and then, bleary eyed, turn around and drive all the way back to Anchorage. Do I need say more?

Anc-Homer with a side trip to Seward is a scenic, stunning drive. But, the Seward hwy is the only route from Anc to the Kenai Peninsula so you will be back tracking all the way from Homer to Palmer/Wasilla 'Y' where you make the choice "to take the Glenn Hwy toward Tok or the George Parks Hwy (Denali) and parts north to Fairbanks".....there's no driving around it.

I recommend the travelalaska.com alternate hwy recommendations as they highlight less traveled destinations. For instance, you might consider driving to Valdez, hop on the ferry to Whittier, Seward or even Homer and drive back up to Anchorage. That's the only way I can think of reducing any back tracking on the Kenai Peninsula/Seward hwy. Be sure to check the ferry rates (could surprise you) and schedule before you lock onto this idea.

Its quite a haul to Denali Park from Anchorage, about 6 hours for us to do it. On the way, don't miss Talkeetna, its still an Alaska adventure. The area immediately outside the Park is referred to by some as "glitter gulch" for its touristy traps. But, in the main, the Park remains a unique experience albeit much more tourist refined than even 10 years ago.

Its only 2-3 hours north from Denali Park entrance to Fairbanks.

You might want to consider the Denali Hwy (Paxson-Cantwell) to hook up with the Parks Hwy. Gold country, remote camping, pretty quiet, scenery, and most tourists miss it.

Your enjoyment of one route or another may be tied to our weather. Rain (not just cloudy) can inhibit activities, reduce sight seeing. Seward and Prince William Sound are frequently overcast and, boy, can it rain. However, a sunny day in Seward is not to be missed. Gorgeous. The driest months in south central Alaska are May and June.

When visiting the Kenai Peninsula, I suggest you think about orienting yourself near Sterling and taking day trips to Seward and the Kenai area. We often stay at one or another of the state campgrounds but there's several nice private campgrounds, too. If your interested, let me know and I'll pass along some places we've tried.

Homer, Kachemak Bay and the Spit .... a different place altogether. We love it enough to have kept a boat moored there. We frequently kick off our summer season with the Shore Bird Festival in Homer. To get away, we'll hang out in Homer, breakfast at the Two Sister's Bakery, walk the beach. Maybe walk the harbor floats or take the boat out to fish a bit and, if we're lucky, have our fresh halibut prepared at Captain Patties. On occasion, we have a pint at Homer Brewing or tasting at the Bear Creek Winery or take a dinner cruise to Halibut Cove. We might send friends on the fast ferry over to Seldovia or one of the many coves for the day or on a Kayak tour across the bay. Homer's a photog's heaven. There's numerous places to camp in the Homer area, even on the spit beach. Did I say its beautiful?

Fairbanks. Busy Fairbanks is located in rolling hills and much like Whitehorse is the jumping off point to the greater interior and full of tourists trying to find something to do. The views are panaoramic, but not much in the way of grand scenery. The rolling hills leading into Fairbanks go on and on...a whole lot acreage, with these little stick trees. There's some decent camping along the way.

Made me chuckle: Between Denali and Fairbanks you'll drive by Skinny Dick's Half Way Inn. Last year there was a forest fire outside of Fairbanks that some locals referred to as the Skinny Dick Fire. Watching one of the local news casts, a reporter in his "get the hot news moment" pointed the mic at a firefighting official and asked "how far has the fire burned"? Without missing a beat the fireman, turning his head away with a wry smile said, "its about half way in".

Its warmer in Fairbanks in the summer and colder in the winter than Anchorage. Nice museum at UAA and "they" say there's some other passable local attractions....but, I am having trouble remembering one. I'm starting to yawn thinking about what to do in Fairbanks. The visitor's bureau talks up the northern lights, ice sculptures, and the dog sled races, but you won't see them in the summer. You might get a glimpse of a stern wheeler on the river, they might even be worth a cruise. And the Arctic Circle? Its 200 miles farther north, up the Dalton Hwy.

There's a lot of touristy talk about gold mines in the Fairbanks area. Gold mines are all about heavy equipment and moving earth in a big way and there's nothing pretty about a gravel pit. But, it is fun to have a small gold pan with you as there are locations in Alaska that you can try recreational panning for gold on public lands. You will likely find some color.

http://www.alaskacenters.gov/upload/...ning-in-AK.pdf

If there's not already, some worn-out Fairbank's miner will eventually figure out how to charge tourists and wanna-be gold miners for the privilege of working his claim. Until then, as the miner who won the state lottery said when asked what he was going to do with his lottery winnings, "I guess I'll just keep mining until its all gone". I don't know of any working gold mines that will allow you to camp, much less pan for gold on their claim in the Fairbanks area. I've crossed that idea off my bucket list.

I never think of Fairbanks as compelling to visit by itself. It has a strip mall, "one shabby boom to the next boomtown" feel. To me its a Costco parking lot via a chain linked fenced main roadway, the end of the rail line, and the interior airport terminus on your way to go hunting or travel to an interior village.

Because I had never been there before, I thought Fairbanks was 'sort of' interesting...the first time. For me, its a place to work or, with my family, to pass through on my way to someplace else. I guess the cultural center and museum(s) are about it. I'm probably going to get some local heat for saying this but buy fuel, pick up some fresh bread, and (since you're already there) check out a museum then head out of town.

The Alaska you came to see is on down the highway.

I've not traveled the Top of the World Hwy. Looking at the map, appears you could reduce the backtracking by driving that way.

Best to you, Uncle Bill. Have good trip, take your time, you're going to love it.
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Old 02-05-2014, 04:46 PM   #38
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Drew at Peculiar.....Jack at West Plains...we are going with the WBCCI caravan to Alaska this summer...happy to meet area Airstreamers...I went to high school at Raymore in '55 and '56. rjackgar@hotmail.com
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Old 02-06-2014, 04:57 PM   #39
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I traveled the TOW last summer, but I was coming from Fairbanks, heading south. I was on my motorcycle, but was dreaming of pulling our AS through there. It's just absolutely beautiful country.
As it's been mentioned, I would definitely try to travel the Cassier one way, I thought it was much more scenic, and saw 10 times the number of bears vs the Alaska Highway, on the way up.
The small side trip over to Hyder Alaska is worth the time also. The changes in scenery and climate are dramatic in a very short distance.
I would also stay off the Campbell Highway. I took it, but it's much too rough to pull a trailer on.
Have a great trip!! I'm jealous
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Old 02-06-2014, 08:53 PM   #40
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GettinAway, thanks for the info. We have finally decided to go north on the Cassier, side trip to Hyder. After Anchorage, Steward and maybe Kodiac, then Denali and Fairbanks and then eventually Chicken and then south on TOW. We have about 3 months so we can play it all be ear. We are getting really excited about the trip.
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Old 02-07-2014, 05:59 AM   #41
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Please post a bunch of pictures here.. When I went (just a two week trip total) in late June early Aug, the Mosquitos were pretty bad, my wife lost a bit of her enthusiasm for our future trip, when she heard my stories.
Your pics will rekindle the fire.
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Old 02-07-2014, 07:39 PM   #42
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Please post a bunch of pictures here.. When I went (just a two week trip total) in late June early Aug, the Mosquitos were pretty bad, my wife lost a bit of her enthusiasm for our future trip, when she heard my stories.
Your pics will rekindle the fire.
Hi,
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