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Old 12-30-2014, 10:57 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by mefly2 View Post
temperatures cold enough that although you have de-iced for visibility, your defroster will not keep the windows clear
This situation is exactly why I carry an old-fashioned felt blackboard eraser in the glovebox of each of my vehicles. Best thing in the world for clearing condensation off the inside of windows and windshield while driving. Absorbent, easy to grip, doesn't leave much in the way of streaks…
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Old 12-30-2014, 11:05 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
This situation is exactly why I carry an old-fashioned felt blackboard eraser in the glovebox of each of my vehicles. Best thing in the world for clearing condensation off the inside of windows and windshield while driving. Absorbent, easy to grip, doesn't leave much in the way of streaks…
Good idea, Prot-

but not just condensation to contend with around here ... actual frost - that must be scraped off of the inside of the windshield ... (this on a late model jeep with apparently poorly engineered defroster vents)... very scary for all involved. I just waited until the snow drifts allowed pulling off and then parked!
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Old 12-30-2014, 11:10 AM   #17
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Good idea, Prot-

but not just condensation to contend with around here ... actual frost - that must be scraped off of the inside of the windshield ... (this on a late model jeep with apparently poorly engineered defroster vents)... very scary for all involved. I just waited until the snow drifts allowed pulling off and then parked!
The felt eraser works for that, too, just turn it over and scrape with a back edge of the wooden grip. It will remove frost while not damaging the glass.
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Old 12-30-2014, 11:20 AM   #18
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I used to think I was as good a winter driver as anyone out there. I'd been doing it for 30 years without an incident, including two years in Iceland. Until two days before Christmas eight years ago. I was driving between Buffalo and Sheridan, WY on I-90 in my 1999 Dodge 2500 4WD truck. I had no trailer, and the bed was empty (ie: running light). It was cold, with intermittent snow pack. Just inside of the Sheridan County line, the road cleared up and I sped up to almost 60 mph and turned the 4WD off. The conditions looked good. Then I hit some black-ice. I couldn't see it. The truck fish-tailed and went off the side of the highway. I did my best impression of Evel Knievel off of a 10-foot box culvert. When I landed, the air-bag went off, the truck broke in half, and I broke my back. All in about 3-4 seconds.

Since then, I am even more cautious with winter driving. I'm clearly not as invincible as I thought. Now, as I finish writing this, I have to take off to Sheridan again....on snow-packed roads.
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Old 12-30-2014, 11:33 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by mefly2 View Post
Good idea, Prot-

but not just condensation to contend with around here ... actual frost - that must be scraped off of the inside of the windshield ... (this on a late model jeep with apparently poorly engineered defroster vents)... very scary for all involved. I just waited until the snow drifts allowed pulling off and then parked!
That was a given for anyone owning an old VW aircooled car. The ice scraper was kept on the sun visor.
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Old 12-30-2014, 12:19 PM   #20
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Scary pulls with "Daisy"???...going downhill in the mountains of PA with the trailer plug coming loose and the AS brake not working...it wasn't real pretty after that. And my initial tow home from picking up Daisy in Bend, OR, and getting caught in a blizzard where you couldn't see the road. Fun times....
Stay safe out there throughout 2015. jon
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Old 12-30-2014, 12:29 PM   #21
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"Gearheart: That was a given for anyone owning an old VW aircooled car. The ice scraper was kept on the sun visor."
*****
Scraping the inside windows on my 1956 and later the 1964 VW bug was thought to be what everyone had to do back in the 1960's. The vacuum windshield wipers in the 1956 created odd driving habits, as you had to let off the gas peddle to create the vacuum to get the wipers moving.

Camping was laying the driver's and passenger's seats back as far as they would go. Almost like a 8 foot Airstream, had they decided to make one.

The "bug" was great in snow, ice, mud and if the tires did not touch the ground... the smooth bottom would be a snow board and you would steer with the front wheels once the snow thinned out.

Never found myself stuck. You would dress INSIDE as if you were outside in the Winter months. No power. No heat. No Air Conditioning. The seats were mostly frame and springs. ... and today they are expensive antiques. Imagine that.
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Old 12-30-2014, 12:38 PM   #22
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OMG....1958 VW 111, with the "Option" group of white walls, leatherette. No radio, no fuel gauge, weighed 1620 lbs, cost $1620.00. My first car, waited three months for it to come in. Sioux Falls, South Dakota, never got stuck, never got warm in the winter. 2/60 A/C. That is two open windows and 60 mph.

I think I need to get another one.....although maintenance is high, changing oil and adjusting valves every 3,000 miles.

Thanks fro the memories....
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Old 12-30-2014, 02:20 PM   #23
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timhortons... I have an easy one for SWIM to attempt. No, not Independence Pass, Colorado but:

Royal Gorge Park, Canon City, Colorado
Royal Gorge Bridge aka 3A Road
Pulling a trailer: I do not think it is allowed. Park it in the Parking Lot.
Driving a vehicle: 4 out of 10 Loose Boards for drivers, 6 out of 10 for passengers

There is a cost to drive across the Royal Gorge Bridge. I remember it being East to West and one way. Call to see if it is open since the big forest fire in the area that burned out some structures and may have affected the suspension bridge... but come one... do not weasel out on this just because of a few technicalities.

It is rather exciting to drive across, knowing that below you is a railroad track that looks like some scratches into the mountain AND a river to add. But, the real entertainment is for the pedestrians that get to walk across the bridge.

When you are crossing the speed limit might be 5mph to avoid pedestrians that are trying to look confident that this thing is going to hold up with YOU and vehicle approaching. So... for their entertainment... lurch your vehicle by applying the throttle just enough and let off. It will cause a real odd sensation... like this bridge is not safe. The pedestrians will be immediately out of the middle of the road and grasping for the handrails on the side.

Works every time. There is also a viewing area on the West side you can watch the commotion on the bridge. The crossing is worth every dollar it costs to maintain the bridge. I do believe it is the highest suspension bridge in the world. Even higher than those reported in Texas and Kansas, which I believe are wild exaggerations.

I, of course, have not attempted the "lurch factor" into crossing this bridge that swings around in a brisk wind. I recall it must have been read... some where.

For those cheapskates that do not want to pay to cross with a vehicle. Park in the lot at night. Sometimes there are private parties or weddings going on and it is all lit up. Take the entire family across the bridge. If you think it was SCARY to cross by foot during the day... you had better be prepared for a night crossing.

Pedestrian crossings: 6 out of 10 Knee Knockers during daylight, 9 in the dark


The last time I drove over the Royal Gorge bridge was in 75 when the road was still a two way gravel county road with no fees whatsoever. Crossed from west to east in my old 62 F-100 Ford pulling our Teton Camp trailer ,with the wife and son in the cab with me . There were a handful of walkers on the bridge that were quite "scared" when crossing in granny low with the engine idling , I abruptly pushed in the clutch and slapped the brakes on . The old deck went into wavy motions that much resembled an earthquake . And the wife was not very happy about the abrupt stop to take some pics either. A short time later it was turned into a three ring circus to reach deep into the touristers pockets.
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Old 12-30-2014, 02:36 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by Thalweg View Post
I used to think I was as good a winter driver as anyone out there. I'd been doing it for 30 years without an incident, including two years in Iceland. Until two days before Christmas eight years ago. I was driving between Buffalo and Sheridan, WY on I-90 in my 1999 Dodge 2500 4WD truck. I had no trailer, and the bed was empty (ie: running light). It was cold, with intermittent snow pack. Just inside of the Sheridan County line, the road cleared up and I sped up to almost 60 mph and turned the 4WD off. The conditions looked good. Then I hit some black-ice. I couldn't see it. The truck fish-tailed and went off the side of the highway. I did my best impression of Evel Knievel off of a 10-foot box culvert. When I landed, the air-bag went off, the truck broke in half, and I broke my back. All in about 3-4 seconds.

Since then, I am even more cautious with winter driving. I'm clearly not as invincible as I thought. Now, as I finish writing this, I have to take off to Sheridan again....on snow-packed roads.
Back when I lived in Cheyenne in the mid seventies , we embarked on a peaceful winters journey west on 80 with Soda Springs Idaho the destination . Was passing through the rail siding of Chrystal about 55 mph at night and the road looked clear through the blowing snow , but felt a bit strange so I eased off the throttle of the 230 CID inline 6 , 3 spd standard trans in the 67 Malibu station wagon and watched in disbelief as the speedometer instantly dropped to about 10 mph . knowing that the rear wheels were now sliding on the black ice , I immediately applied throttle to get the speedometer back to 55 and very slowly decreased speed while easing to the shoulder where the gravel had been slung to regain traction .
Had I had any sense back then I would have turned around and went back to Cheyenne , but instead drove over 400 more miles west .
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Old 12-30-2014, 02:58 PM   #25
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Are we going to talk about dangerous roads in normal conditions, or dangerous things people do on normal roads in bad conditions?

I thought it was the former.

Ken
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Old 12-30-2014, 04:50 PM   #26
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I don't think it's allowed (or at least not recommended) anymore, but the Going to the Sun Highway in Glacier National Park was a bit of a challenge driving while pulling a trailer back in '69. I was 15 and had my learner's permit. I was Dad's relief driver when he had a bit more to drink than he should have. His tow vehicle of choice was a '67 Olds Toronado and we were pulling a 16' canned ham. A rock slide took out the outer lane at one point and traffic was reduced to what remained of the single inner lane. We had to get so close to the rock wall on the inside lane it took out the rear-view extension mirror strapped to the front fender of the car. Ahhh...good memories of my youth.
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Old 12-31-2014, 11:33 AM   #27
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I have to fix some things, get ready for guests and shovel some snow, so I can't read the preceding 25 posts except I noticed mention by Ken that the thread turned, possibly, into scary experiences instead of scary roads. As the inspiration for this (please sent money), I suggested roads which can include your scary experience or not.

A scary road (I know of many, but must move on for now)—Little Park Road. It starts down near the edge of Grand Junction and climbs half a mile to my house and beyond. It does the climb in 7 miles (plus one flat mile to my driveway). At least one grade is 17%. Lots and lots of blind curves, some nasty drop offs. The good parts are pretty good pavement, some newly done in 2014, excellent views of Grand Mesa, Grand Valley, Bookcliffs and mountains beyond. It starts in a somewhat strange subdivision, rises through public lands (BLM; Colorado National Monument is close or adjacent) with sage—more piñon/juniper forest as you travel higher. Great rock formations like southern Utah. You may meet bicycles on those curves and now that the county allows ATV's on county roads, they may be there too. There are zero passing areas. To me the bikes and ATV's are the most dangerous part of the road.

Not having lived here that long, I have only done the trailer round trip 4 or 5 times. I have also done two round trips with a rental truck. The trucks were the most scary since they aren't maintained that well. I go downhill mostly in 2nd with the trailer. I do not fear this road, but I do respect it. The time I leave or come home when it has (or is) snowing will be the time I am scared. But it is more likely there will be snow on my steep driveway than on the road—the county does a pretty good job keeping it clear.

If I had no mountain driving experience, this would be a scary road. It is also home, so I'm used to it.

Another note—there are scary roads with trailers and scary roads without. The latter would include some Colorado mining roads where only 4wd will get you through. There are back country roads all over the west and elsewhere, but it seems this forum is more about towing, so I'd think those kind of scary roads and associated experiences would be more interesting.

Gotta deal with snow, 9˚ and the rest—maybe back in 2015.

Gene
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Old 12-31-2014, 12:59 PM   #28
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As stated above any road with black ice is entertaining. Driving into a dust storm will make your butt pucker. Some people are panicked on high bridges, especially over water. Driving towards a black storm front, with street lights coming on will make you think twice. But what concerns me the most is ''texting teens'' with a SMASHED FRONT BUMPER. You'd think they would learn from the first time .
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