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Old 08-25-2007, 06:55 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by romap
So, with all this about what is a safe speed, is there a cut and dry chart to look at that states what the safe speed vs weight is for the common Goodyear Marathons (which seem to have blowout issues if improperly inflated/loaded)?

I tend to keep it between 60 and 65, but must sometimes go faster for short spurts. Inquiring minds need to know.

I feel comfortable towing at 70 if the conditions exist, but I am concerned about the tires.
All I know is that since I've kept it at 65 and lower (like you, a few short spurts), I've had ZERO tire issues. Tire pressure remains at around 64lbs, cold. Prior to that I had one sidewall bubble and two blow outs. I'm a believer.
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Old 08-25-2007, 04:53 PM   #44
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:19 PM   #45
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Having never towed anything before, when coming home, the fastest I felt safe at was 55 - 60. Maybe when there is a little more experience, I might go a little faster - but I definately did not drive the way I normally do (hey, that might be a good thing!)
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:53 PM   #46
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siding with Kevbo... or his alter ego

it's a Hemi dude! Word has it that the Mercedes V8 SUV with a 19' Bambi made 143mph before the camper started to lift off... now that's aerodyanmics! And I thought 105 was excessive...
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Old 08-27-2007, 08:57 PM   #47
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Hey we're towing our Airstream's<>right? Let's give all the wannabe's time to gawk" ......... Just returned from the hill country of western PA. 60-65 was plenty quick enough. After all it's supposed to be fun not stressful..and half the fun of Stream'n is the journey.
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Old 08-30-2007, 08:09 PM   #48
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I have found that right around 60 mph, with a plus or minus of 5 mph works out best for me (19 ft Bambi and Ford Ranger 4x4).

Of course, I do have the advantage of my Ford Ranger having a "built-in automatic overspeed detection and notification system". On my Ranger, 65 mph is about exactly straight-up on the speedometer, and as the needle gradually creeps to the 65 mph vertical (as it will sometimes do on long straightaways) anyway, the instant the speedometer needle hits a true vertical my "built-in automatic overspeed detection and notification system" goes off and I hear a voice in my ear (coming from the passenger seat) saying "going a little fast aren't we?"...

You see, on my Ranger the way the instrument panel is configured the passenger can see the whole speedometer and readings.... Next time I buy a truck I am going to check and make sure the instruments are recessed enough so they cannot be read from the co-pilots seat.

Not that I want to go much (if any) over 65, but co-pilots don't always need all the information... :-)

regards, Dave
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Old 08-30-2007, 11:11 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wagnerda
On my Ranger, 65 mph is about exactly straight-up on the speedometer, and as the needle gradually creeps to the 65 mph vertical (as it will sometimes do on long straightaways) anyway, the instant the speedometer needle hits a true vertical my "built-in automatic overspeed detection and notification system" goes off and I hear a voice in my ear (coming from the passenger seat) saying "going a little fast aren't we?"...

You see, on my Ranger the way the instrument panel is configured the passenger can see the whole speedometer and readings.... Next time I buy a truck I am going to check and make sure the instruments are recessed enough so they cannot be read from the co-pilots seat.

Not that I want to go much (if any) over 65, but co-pilots don't always need all the information... :-)

regards, Dave
Hey! I've got one of those, too!

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Old 09-01-2007, 09:29 PM   #50
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"Is it a good idea to drive 75 MPH on the interstate while towing? no. Is it acceptable? I think it depends on the conditions. I think it is safer to go with the flow when the interstate isn't crowded than it is to become a road hazard. When the interstate is crowded, I think slower is better.

It is neither good nor acceptable. It is no adequate defense to a jury of your peers as no insurance or highway engineering study will support it. "Going with the flow" is the lazy way out. Learn to see those packs of idiots coming in the rearview and back out of the throttle to avoid being the centerpoint of jam. It's only a question of finesse. Be the shepherd, not the sheep. The driver, and the driver ALONE is responsible for his vehicles actions, not the herd.

Consider this, 5 MPH on a 400 mile trip will save you more than half an hour of drive time. That last half hour is the most fatiguing. You avoid that last half hour of driving fatigued and you arrive much less irritable and you spend half an hour less behind the wheel driving in an irritable mood. So is it better to take roughly 6-1/4 hours to travel 400 miles at 65 MPH or add 5 MPH and get there in roughly 5-3/4 hours at 70 MPH.


Again, a poor understanding (however common) of vehicle dynamics and driver fatigue. One will not find studies to support the above contention, the opposite in fact. The driver moving at 65 is far more relaxed over the course of a day of handling a rig than at 70 mph and above. The time savings is so ridiculously small (as in above quote) as to further heighten the advantages of the lower speed.

Braking distance, reaction time, and evasive manuevers are far more easily acccomplished at a reasonable speed. 70 mph in the least-roadworthy vehicles out there (all RV's) is foolhardy at best. As an old driver once said to me: "Up to 70 you drive the truck, after 70 it drives you". As a former truck driver I can assure you that it is a far more roadworthy vehicle than any RV save a big dollar NEWELL or the like. Our limits are lower.

I think we all want our rigs to perform at their best; we sweat the details of tires, rigging and TV concerns and -- hopefully -- we practice some emergency manuevers at highway speeds (fast lane change to avoid big debris, say) to gauge what might happen IF . . . but I hope we don't throw it out the window, all of it clean out the window, over a few minutes of time.

Best if we trip plan with stops in mind, keep them short, and maintain a nice steady pace if we have to cover a lot of ground in one day. That is the mantra of the trucking industry, of the successfull owner/operator: Keep the left door shut and the truck between the lines. What seems simple often isn't.
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Old 09-01-2007, 10:51 PM   #51
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What's the hurry??

Hi all!

My hubby drives very carefully and very cautiously. He is the best driver I have ever known. We live in California and the tow speed limit here is 55 and that's where he keeps it. Being a retired Police officer who has seen it all, he makes more sense than most. First off, obey the law and don't sweat the guy behind you. Why risk an accident by speeding? Really, what's the big hurry? Why put more stress on your Airstream and tow vehicle??!! Our Ford F-350 weighs 7,500 lbs. and the Safari 28W weighs 7,300 lbs. Stopping distance increases with speed. We want to get there in one piece. Why speed to save a few minutes? So far so good. I wish you all great times in your A/S's and most of all safe times.

Best,

Shirley, 2005 Safari 28 W and Ford F-350 Crew Cab
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Old 09-01-2007, 11:06 PM   #52
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I think we all want our rigs to perform at their best; we sweat the details of tires, rigging and TV concerns and -- hopefully -- we practice some emergency manuevers at highway speeds (fast lane change to avoid big debris, say) to gauge what might happen IF . . . but I hope we don't throw it out the window, all of it clean out the window, over a few minutes of time.


Hi, REDNAX. I agree with most of what you said except for the "fast lane change to avoid big debris;" I personally, from experience, believe you are safer to just run over whatever is in the road than to try and dodge it and lose control of your vehicles [tow vehicle and trailer] and / or run into other vehicles causeing a bigger mess than running over somethings like a tail pipe and muffler or a drive shaft. I have actually run over a tailpipe and muffler on the freeway; It made a lot of noise, but suffered no damage. I have run over a drive shaft on the freeway and got a flat tire from it; Not a big deal. And finally I have run over a 2"X4" on the freeway, while driveing a motorcycle; We [the motorcycle and I] left the ground a few inches, for a few feet and kept on going. My theory, is basically, to not panic.
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Old 09-02-2007, 12:15 AM   #53
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I, too, sir, agree that sharp swerves are to be avoided. The reason I mention practicing a double lane change at speed is to know what the heck it feels like and how much distance it takes.

My parents, in 1997, were northbound on I-25 out of Walsenburg, CO with their Silver Streak behind their Suburban at 55 mph. Pops had to swerve into the left lane to avoid a 40' 6x6 some lousy truck driver failed to secure and that was laying athwart the striping. He almost made it but the rear tandem tire caught it, the trailer flipped one way and the truck rolled twice in the air the other way (hitch broke) before landing upright. The propane system went (on a Silver Streak the gas is enclosed in black iron under the enclosed belly) and the trailer exploded/burned. The Suburban was rebuilt and ran another eight years (amazingly).

I'll put my old man up against anyone in a driving skill contest. His record since 1939 speaks for itself. His gentle swerve still did not save him, nor would driving over that wood have been any better. The witnesses attested the accident to the CO Hwy Patrol who themselves expressed their humility at being able to have done the same.

One needs to know ones own limits, one needs to know ones' rigs limits and one needs to be traveling at a reasonable speed.

(And now you know why I bought a Hensley Arrow the day after I bought the trailer. Skill, luck and experience are not a substitute for eliminating chance).
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Old 09-02-2007, 06:07 AM   #54
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Driving aware

[quote=REDNAX]I, too, sir, agree that sharp swerves are to be avoided. The reason I mention practicing a double lane change at speed is to know what the heck it feels like and how much distance it takes.
[/quote

Couldn't agree more!!! I firmly believe that a very large portion of our winter driving accidents here in Buffalo are made worse by drivers not knowing how their vehicles will react in such conditions. After the first Major storm every year my wife and I go to a very large open parking lot and re-learn our winter driving skill's<><><><> BE SAFE...............BOB
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Old 09-02-2007, 09:11 AM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REDNAX
...
Braking distance, reaction time, and evasive manuevers are far more easily acccomplished at a reasonable speed.
...
I think we all want our rigs to perform at their best; we sweat the details of tires, rigging and TV concerns and -- hopefully -- we practice some emergency manuevers at highway speeds (fast lane change to avoid big debris, say) to gauge what might happen IF . . . but I hope we don't throw it out the window, all of it clean out the window, over a few minutes of time.
...
Good discussion by all. Going faster complicates things, whether it's 15 mph in a parking lot or over 50 on the highway.

I haven't heard anyone talk about practicing stops. How short of a space can you haul that combined 7-15k lbs of TV/trailer to a complete stop? What if it's on a corner?

Safe towing speed? There is no speed without risk (even zero), but your ability to react to situations decreases with speed. Your tolerance for risk will determine your comfortable towing speed, which I suspect will be significantly reduced if the tail ever wags the dog (with or without an accident).

I feel that people towing with marginal setups can go as fast as people with great setups, but probably cannot swerve, accellerate, or stop as well. I hope I'm not around the marginal TV if they run out of luck and can no longer control their path. They say "the fall doesn't kill you, it's the sudden stop at the end".

I guess I am just feeling a little depressed. I have showed my wife pics of Airstream accidents and now she says she doesn't want to drive...I can understand why.
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Old 09-02-2007, 12:07 PM   #56
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Another factor to consider:

Just as important as your towing speed is how close you follow the traffic in front of you.

A normal distance between yourself and the vehicle in front of you are going to be different with and without a trailer. I see many people on the road pulling a trailer keeping the same distance as if they didn't have the trailer. I do my best to stay away from them. And I back off farther from someone in front of me if they're tailgating the vehicle in front of them.

Also, keeping your distance can give you additional reaction time to avoid those things laying on road.

My wife knows I'm not happy about certain traffic when I start this unique twitch I have.
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