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Old 02-06-2014, 07:32 AM   #547
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Love that paneling.

It is amazing that you can do all of this beautiful work, in spite of the pain.

Congratulations on your admirable determination and perseverance in the face of such adversity.


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Old 02-08-2014, 12:28 AM   #548
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I've learned a lot about chronic pain since I injured my back 29 years ago. There were some bad periods then until I built my body so it was strong enough to handle it. When you work with paper all the time plus phone calls and such, it is easy to get flabby. Weak muscles can't work well to compensate for a back injury, so physical therapy was what worked for me.

But I also learned to ignore most of the pain by keeping occupied and going into educated denial. I observed how my back was working, but ignored as much pain as a I could. I also made changes—cross country skiing was out because if I fell on my back, I would seriously aggravate it; being aware of that, I skied with too much caution and fell a lot. I had been very good at it, but I had become too scared of injuring myself. This was one fear I couldn't work around. I miss racing through the forest on narrow steep trails on cross country skis—a thrill I can't put into words. Somehow I never ran into a tree—it was probably the craziest thing I ever did and I'd do it again and again if I could. I stopped backpacking because of my knees, so I lost another contact with the wilderness. These 2 things were rough to give up because being in the wilderness is an amazing experience, one that everyone should have. It puts "civilization" into perspective. But there are other thing to do—I learned how to play pickup volleyball with people half my age and then when I got past 50, started remodeling.

So I compensated pretty well and remodeled 2 houses plus working and then retiring and doing a lot of traveling. But gradually in the past year the pain increased. Denial wasn't working too well and Ibuprofen helped a little, but I avoid it because of the side effects. Eventually I couldn't take the sharp spikes of pain and inability to walk far or stand for long. That's when I saw orthopedists.

So the challenge of chronic pain was not withstanding the pain itself, but what to do about it. Eventually the pain became too much and I had to change direction—actually see a doctor or 2. People tend to think you have to ignore pain, stop "complaining", and then you can do anything. I can't imagine how anyone can ignore stabbing pain plus the constant pain that wears down a body and leads to exhaustion. I can understand how people get addicted to legal and illegal drugs because otherwise there is no peace—every movement can result in sharp pain that makes you catch your breath and cry out. When there is no alternative to drugs so strong that you can't function and have to live inside a dark little place in your head, what can you do? Not a road I want to go down, but I can see how tempting it is and cannot criticize someone who gets lost in this journey. So I learned you have to look for simple, conservative solutions and keep at life while being careful. A balancing act where you often fail. It helps a lot to have a good spouse so you don't turn inward—Barb helps keep me in the world and helps when I'm struggling.

Pain is a great teacher, but one I'd prefer to do without. Wrestling a chainsaw or using a snowblower isn't usually recommended treatment, but it makes me feel whole. Millions of people have to deal with pain and some have it much worse than me. The emotional and physical pain of dying for months from cancer is something I can't imagine and I know that's far worse than any of my experience. It is almost fruitless to measure pain mathematically, but the pain specialists try. They know it is completely subjective. They use a 1-10 scale—it should be a logarithm.

I think about this a lot trying to find the graceful way through it. I try to not scare Barb (she's always watching to see if I'm ok) and actually ask her for help when I really need it. Just another test for living. Otherwise life is pretty good—try being homeless or losing your home or being chronically hungry—lots of existential pain there. Writing about it helps me understand it and I hope it doesn't appear narcissistic, but it is therapeutic. If it helps others understand their pain, so much the better. My pain is nothing compared to what some others face; they are heroes.

We made to Santa Fe today. It was 9˚ in Pueblo when we drove out of town and 20 miles south it was 32˚. That was the border of a cold front and the trip was pretty windy with nasty crosswinds as we drove 75 mph down I-25. We stopped in Las Vegas (the NM one, not Nevada) and ate lunch at the Spic and Span. Very local place. Great beans, very good if unusual quesadilla, but the tortillas had too much gluten (thus, glue) and the rellenos were weird. Still a good stop for lunch, but hard to find—we are never sure where we are in Las Vegas. We have a suite for a very good winter price. Huevos rancheros in the morning at Zia. Yum. And it is supposed to get warmer for several days. I look forward to laziness and food and dinner tomorrow with a friend (once our realtor, she remains a friend now that we bought elsewhere).

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Old 02-11-2014, 10:05 AM   #549
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Gene,

Such a mixed bag -- wonderful that your right side has improved (pain wise), but not so good news about the left. I, too, injured my back several years ago; I was moving our wrought iron patio furniture by myself as we had some tornadic winds coming and were advised not to have anything outside which could end up coming through a window. Anyway, in retrospect, I should not have tried moving it all myself (very, very heavy). Now, if I stand too long, or work with my hands/arms out in front of me too long -- as in preparing large meals at the kitchen counter or working at my worktable in my studio, I pay for it later and end up at the chiropractor's office. All this to say, I understand your pain, although I know yours is much, much worse than mine. I'm sorry you are going through this.

Your home sounds as tho it's coming along wonderfully, and you are doing such great work! I truly enjoy reading your thread; I look forward to your new posts.

You mentioned eating Tex-Mex food in Santa Fe, would you mind sharing where? We went through there going to a car show in Pueblo, CO going on six years ago. We stayed at a lovely old hotel downtown (before Airstream, besides we were driving our '36 Ford), and one place we ate, which we just loved was Tia Sophia's for breakfast -- the blueberry pancakes were to die for! We are going to attend the Vintage Trailer Academy in May and plan to drive up to spend a day or two in Santa Fe while out that way, so I'd love to hear of some other great Mexican restaurants out that way! Also, any that you know of in Albuquerque?

Thanks, Gene, and I wish you the speediest recovery.

Deb
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Old 02-11-2014, 12:37 PM   #550
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Thanks Deb for the kind words. Being lazy in Santa Fe helps my back and I hope that it is healing and not just a few days rest that is having an effect. Once back in harness I'll find out. I can understand moving stuff yourself when no one else is around—the job has to be done, and just do it then suffer later.

There are 453 restaurants in SF according to Tripadvisor. We try to eat at one or two new ones every time we are here, so we have to keep coming back. I'll try to remember a few of them.

I love huevos rancheros and chili rellenos. They are my test foods for restaurants. This may color my opinion because some place can make great rellenos and the rest of the food is awful.

We always go to Zia one morning for huevos. Some of their food is a bit weird, but the huevos are good. The interior is a kind of Art Deco with southwest influence. It is on Guadalupe in the Railroad District and has parking in the back. Tecolote is also good for huevos. It is very much a locals place and is on Cerillos. Closed on Mondays as we found out yesterday. So we went to Cafe Pascuals (Water St. at the corner of Don Gaspar). The huevos tasted good, but breakfast for two was $36 plus tip. That included tea and coffee and 2 versions of huevos. It is very small and crowded. We were seated at a table next to the register and two guys were always hovering about and talking loudly, but we had good service. Crowded atmosphere, bad prices, but highly recommended by others. About 10 miles north of town on US 285 is a little place called Roadrunner—across from Buffalo Thunder Casino I believe, and next to Roadrunner RV park. We had really good huevos there last year. Tomasitas (Railroad Dist., Guadalupe) is very popular and there's often a wait. But we avoid it because sometimes it is very good, sometimes not at all.

That takes care of breakfast and some places serve breakfast all day.

We went to Los Potrillos (young horses, yearlings) the other night and it is supposed to be a local place. We were disappointed. The rellenos were undercooked and unexceptional. On Cerillos just past El Rey on opposite side going south. Yesterday we had lunch at Blue Corn Cafe near the Plaza on San Francisco in El Mercado. This place is our default southwest food restaurant when downtown and is usually good, sometimes very good, sometimes not so much. I think we had a chalupa and some other veggie meal. They have another restaurant out near I-25 and Cerillos in a shopping center. Can't think of others now.

After a while, it is time to eat something different.

There are lots of other cuisines in SF. MuDu Noodles on Cerillos always has some good Asian food. Parking is not easy though. Vinaigrette is a salad restaurant and very good, but finding it is a challenge and parking can be even harder. In fact, parking near many SF restaurants is difficult. Jinja Bar and Bistro (Guadalupe going out of town north in a shopping center with movie theater) is a good Asian place, very popular. Chocolate Maven Bakery and Rest. has wonderful chocolate cookies, cakes and more and lunch was ok, but the chocolate was wonderful. Located down a crowded driveway next to an auto repair shop, it is not easy to find. Cafe Cafe for Italian and pizza was good too, though I recall an uninspired interior, but that was a couple of years ago.

As for Albuquerque, what I can remember is a restaurant called Church St. Rest. (at least it was on Church St.) in Old Town and a block north of the plaza. There's also a restaurant in the Indian Cultural Center (used to be an Indian school) just north of I-40 where we had a good breakfast last October. Pretty vague I know.

Looking through a restaurant list, I notice some old favorites have disappeared, so they may be gone. The Shed has been recommended, but we haven't gotten there yet. There's a place called the "Bang Bite Filling Station" that I think is a burger joint and thus I'll never go there, but what a great name. You will not starve in New Mexico.

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Old 02-11-2014, 01:15 PM   #551
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Thank you, Gene, that list will be printed off and placed in our Albuquerque file to use while out there.

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Old 02-11-2014, 01:49 PM   #552
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Thanks Deb. Not a very complete list. I just looked on TripAdvisor to find an Italian place for today and didn't really find anything appealing. Cafe Cafe had some bad reviews recently, but we may go there anyway.

I forgot to mention El Farol. It is the oldest bar in town and features tapas. We've had some really good meals there, but haven't been there in several years. I had a run in with a cop about whether I was parked illegally (no signs, curb "painted" for no parking with faded paint and snow covering the curb). He backed down but was a real jerk. So be careful where you park—there's a public lot nearby. It is a funky place with music at night and many quirky rooms besides the bar. Everyone should go there once anyway. It is on Canyon, far up the road past about a million galleries where you can spend tens of thousands of dollars in minutes.

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Old 02-15-2014, 11:18 PM   #553
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405 miles from Santa Fe to our new house—seemed like forever. First thing, about 10 miles north of Santa Fe, we stopped at the Roadrunner Cafe for the best huevos rancheros of the trip. I didn't get an afternoon nap. Napping on our Santa Fe break became a guilty pleasure I was getting used to. Barb did a lot of the driving while I read a lot or stared into space. We stopped to see a friend about the middle of the trip, catching up and getting a break.

We got to the new house and quickly discovered the freezer had suffered a stroke. After stumbling around unloading the FJ, I had to come to attention. The compressor was limping along, the new fan was fanning and the temp inside was 56˚. We leave the house at 50˚ when we're away, so the freezer was warmer than the house. Nothing much in the freezer that couldn't take it— we keep things like granola and nuts and dried fruit in it—keeps better that way, but can warm up for a while. A little but of ice cream was lost, but maybe that's a good thing.

I played around with it for a while and got the temp down to 26˚ in about 6 hours. The next day it stayed in the 20's and even dipped a little lower, but never 0˚. I think the compressor has something like congestive heart failure. This means a new freezer is likely, not a welcome expense. We were offered a chance to buy a large hand made cabinet with lots of southwest inlay—beautiful, and half the original price. But that's still a thousand bucks and a freezer is more important. We've been told that since people change their kitchens frequently, they don't make fridges and freezers to last more than 10 years, or less. They used to last a lifetime. Now we expect the fridge to die soon. No doubt the dishwasher, oven, cooktop and microwave are all in line at our kitchen hospice.

Came back to the old house and were greated by about 6 to 8" of frozen slush—bounced up the driveway and fortunately the truck is well above the center. Haven't seen 50˚ for 3 months—snow has been frozen for so long it won't melt much and just absorbs a lot of water and packs very hard. Went out woodcutting this afternoon and got enough piņon for the rest of the month, but cutting wood in deep semi-frozen slush is difficult. Barb carried the wood through the forest to the truck—that may have been worse than using the chain saw. Will go back soon for the rest of that dead pinõn tree, but we have to find some more for March. We cut some juniper a while back and it burns too fast and doesn't put out the heat the piņon does, but I haven't found any more piņon easy to get to. The best thing was though my back hurt, it was not nearly as much as even a few weeks ago. Tomorrow I put together a plow blade for the riding mower and see if it can push all that slush—I think the wheels will spin, but I'll try. Got a few buckets of ashes to spread on it to melt some if nothing else works.

Back to the new house Monday and find out how the sickly freezer is doing and maybe going freezer shopping that day. Hope to finish the basement room this coming week, bring the combination weight machine and start using it. Remodeling exercises you, but weight training makes big muscles to make remodeling easier. Been skating by too long and muscles are now slush. We've got about 3 or 4 projects going at once—makes for crazy time. We plow though it all.

Next trip is to see mother in law in mid-April, but Airstreaming in 3 months away when we celebrate 28 years together. 30 gets ever closer. But winter will return.

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Old 02-16-2014, 12:42 AM   #554
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Hi, I can't go back a forth like you can. We have about 900 miles between us. We have been doing things around our old house and I have to take a trip soon to get some things done at the new house. I needed to have my furnace repaired/updated and that cost me quite a bit. I had to move a large cabinet to uncover the floor hatch. Today I moved it back. We also re-located a huge framed mirror. I have a bracket that I made so the mirror won't fall off of the wall and it also puts a nice tilt on it. Maybe I could put a snow plow on the front of my new "Powermover". It's pretty heavy and has five wheels. I have to take care of business up North, finish my washer/dryer install, buy and install some other odds and ends, and bring a small U-Haul trailer loaded with stuff with me. Hoping to make my trip next week. Had plenty of things that had to be done around here and seeing my Dentist on Tuesday will hopefully be the last so I can go.
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Old 02-17-2014, 08:06 AM   #555
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Bob, nice to know we are not the only crazy people who have 2 houses to take care of and dentists to see. Life is full of things, big and small, to take care of. I need to call Dish and cut back on the costs of all those worthless channels—pay for 20 to get one you want. But every call to them takes an hour. I have to deal with the freezer issues today—buy the almost cheapest because they don't last and I really don't need a digital readout on the outside of the door. I've come to realize the repair guy is going to say it isn't worth repairing, so why I am having him look at it? I got the snow blade put together and had to try it out. The snow is like wet cement, wetter every day, and partially frozen, so I got stuck in the driveway and it took me an hour to get out. Why did I do that to myself? I now need to buy chains for the tires.

But I only have to drive 85 miles between houses, so that's better than 900. It is warm out (late January thaw) and I can watch the amazingly boring Olympics later.

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Old 02-22-2014, 12:24 PM   #556
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The freezer is fixed! A blocked filter was keeping refrigerant from flowing to the coils properly. It works better than it ever has and I hope it keeps working and working. I think in a few years it will die and we'll replace both the freezer and fridge (they are both uprights and distinct—that is no freezer in the fridge and vice versa).

I got the snow blade assembled for the lawn tractor (I thought it was a riding mower, but it is apparently the tougher "lawn tractor") and it sort of works. Kind of clunky, but cheaper than a plow for the truck. But the snow was so heavy, wet and semi-frozen that it didn't work well and I got stuck in the driveway. I shouldn't have even tried it, but I had to. I got out after about an hour. I may need chains for the wheels and hope to find cheap ones.

The basement room has been almost finished for a month. Finish work is the slowest and thus, tantalizing because you can I see the light at the end of the tunnel, but the tunnel seems to get longer as you work. All the trim work is done except for some shoe molding. Since the floor is uneven, the 1 x 4 I use for baseboards (pine finished naturally with 3 coats of polyurethane wet sanded smooth to have a slight sheen) shows dark voids between it and the tile. So we got some molding to nail to it and we can bend it to be more or less flush to the tile floor. A cross section of it would be a 3/4" high, 1/4" deep rectangle with the upper outside curved. These milled moldings are expensive, but I didn't want to take the time to make something like I had done with ceiling molding.

I made a simple threshold for the new door even though it doesn't actually go under the door—used an extra piece of the laminate in the hallway, cut it to fit and locked it into the hallway floor. Kind of works and I may replace it with something better later. Bifold doors on other end of room plus all the trim around them are installed, but a few things left to do there (mainly knobs and some adjustments then paint them). Various trim pieces have to be polyurethaned.

Next we have to start preparing for the upstairs hallway. Finishing 1 x 4 we use for trim (baseboards, ceiling molding, etc.) and sanding doors and possibly polyurethaning them outside or downstairs to avoid the odor in our living space. We've cut up the bargain beadboard (oak veneer at half price and pre-finished) into thirds because that's how we'll use it and it gets all those 4 x 8 sheets out of the way and begun staining and polyurethaning the caps for the beadboard.

But we have another project —kitchen cabinet doors and drawers. We have the new doors for 2 upper cabinets getting glass installed. We pick them up Monday; already checked and they fit perfectly—they should. The cost far more than they should, but we wanted to open up some of the cabinets with glass and display our dishes. We finally found a paint color that worked to paint the rest of the doors and drawers to get rid of the too white melamine and it is grey with some blue in it. It works with everything else and adds color to the room. Grey doesn't have to be dingy. The best way to finish it would be to spray, but taking off about 30 doors and removing about 20 drawers (yes, this is a big kitchen!), is too much, so we are going to try a small mohair roller cover to get a smooth finish without brush strokes. Then we can paint them in place. We found some old timey drawer pulls in brushed nickel (matches ceiling lights and switch plates and the far-in-the-future fridge and freezer) and bargain cabinet knobs (simple, cheap, matches).

We had agreed to do the master bedroom next, but doing the hallway that connects everything on the main floor will get rid of a bunch of doors and other things we have leaning against walls all over the house. The kitchen gets new things periodically as we figure it out. We have started looking at cabinets for the hallway to the garage from the kitchen—cheap birch production cabinets painted with that same grey/blue and the same knobs and drawer pulls for the kind of stuff a mud room requires seems like a good solution. We have a 8' 6" space presently filled with melamine shelves there we want to turn into a mudroom with a 4' bench, places to hang baseball caps and a few coats, leave boots and muddy shoes. Maybe I'll put in a tile counter top, or just buy a cheap Formica one to get it done fast. So there's another project that makes a big change fairly fast and doesn't cost much. Birch cabinets cost half what oak does and we couldn't match the oak color in the kitchen easily. The bench would be far enough away from the kitchen oak to be something different like naturally finished maple. So maybe the mudroom area goes before the hallway while we prepare for the hallway and start ordering paneling for the bedroom.

Meanwhile, winter has disappeared and it is more like early spring. We need more winter because we need to have lots of snow to have water all year, but warm weather brings out home buyers and we definitely need them to show up. I try not to worry about selling the "old" house, but I do.

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Old 02-22-2014, 12:48 PM   #557
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Sounds like your pain level is under control.


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Old 02-22-2014, 01:17 PM   #558
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Maggie, every day is different, but I try to keep going, however slowly it is. Without Barb helping, I'd be taking twice the time to do anything, and I'm not so fast anyway. I will go back to the cyst doc eventually, but still hoping it heals more. I suspect it won't. Once I get all the exercise equipment to the new house, I can start building up those elusive muscles again. That may help.

Being lazy today is helping—spending time on the Forum allows some rest, but I plan to wash windows and cut firewood at the "old" house this weekend.

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Old 03-05-2014, 11:05 PM   #559
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The basement room is finished! That took all winter and more. Looks good, will bring combination exercise machine tomorrow and put it back together and we must start exercising again. Flabby old guy after months of not doing weight training plus some aerobics. That should help my back too.

After about 6 or 7 weeks, the cyst draining has had good results on one side, and not so good on the other, but still a little better week by week. I go back to the cyst doc next week and I think the best thing is to get left cyst drained again and hope it works better this time. If not, then I think I look for neurosurgeon, not an orthopedic one. Some days I can put in 6 hours remodeling, other days less. If I stay seated on a small bench, I can cut firewood, so I did.

Having a need for a quick project, we decided to make a mud room. The hallway between the kitchen and garage had pantry closets on one side and ugly white melamine shelves on the other. We took out the shelves and we're saving them for use in a workshop closet someday. We got some cheap birch cabinets and installed them—paint and nice hardware will make them look fine for a mudroom. I'll create a tile countertop with a southwest design mostly from leftover tile and then build a maple bench next to it. That provides a place to sit while getting off muddy boots, or a place to put down packages going in and out. The counter top will be home for some kitchen machinery that doesn't get used too often and would clutter the kitchen proper. Also a good place for keys, gloves, wool hats and mail. Some hooks above the bench (because I hate hanging up a coat in a closet) and more hooks for baseball caps. We'll paint the cabinets the same bluish grey as we will paint the cabinets in the kitchen. Some left over beadboard from the basement room ceiling will be backing the bench and adding some interest because of the texture. We're kind of figuring this out as we go along, but it's coming together and we're recycling stuff, doing it cheap with some special things (cabinet hardware, maple bench and some for hooks, cool receptacle plate). Next the short hallway which connects every first floor room—new doors, beadboard, paint, moldings. Then the bedroom.

The first part of winter was really cold and we had periods of much snow, but the past 6 weeks or so have been the opposite—warmer than normal, some snow, some rain, some dry (always lots of dry here). Feels like early spring, but the mountains and Front Range are still deep in winter. Until that breaks, house inquiries are usually slow in western Colorado. We hope for snow for the water we need, and early spring for the house buyer we need.

Photos later.

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Old 03-06-2014, 06:49 AM   #560
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