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Old 12-29-2011, 06:46 PM   #1
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Our First Trip - - But Condensation?

We are on our first trip in the new Flying Cloud. We are in Buellton, Ca. at the Flying Flags RV park. Beautiful weather and having a great trip so far. Well, except that the compressor for auto levelling my Suburban blew out and I have to have it replaced Friday at a local dealer.

But, I have a question about condensation. Night time temps are about 35F here. In the am we have quite a bit of condensation on the windows. Our dealer told us the heat pump was the best way to get rid of the condensation. So, I have been running the HP for about 2 hours in the am after we take showers and what not. What do others do?

I hope this picture posts.
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Old 12-29-2011, 06:52 PM   #2
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I don't believe the heat pump will remove moisture any more than the furnace will....which is not at all. With the heat pump, the cold side is outside and the hot side is inside. A/C removes moisture by condensing moist air over cold coils. When on heat pump setting cold coils are outside and your warm moist air passes over the hot coils and no condensation takes place.

Some will say crack a window, and that will work for small condensation issues, albeit wasteful from an energy standpoint.
I choose the small dehumidifer option.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:01 PM   #3
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Being NW Washington State types, we know about condensation, especially with our AS coaches. We use liquid-filled radiators fore and aft to keep the moisture at bay. Propane is a "wet" fuel and we don't use the furnace except when it's chilly enough that our heat strip and the radiators don't get it.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:09 PM   #4
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Being NW Washington State types, we know about condensation, especially with our AS coaches. We use liquid-filled radiators fore and aft to keep the moisture at bay. Propane is a "wet" fuel and we don't use the furnace except when it's chilly enough that our heat strip and the radiators don't get it.
It is true that any fuel which is combusted will create moisture IN ITS EXHAUST. It will not create moisture inside your coach. If it does, you are leaking CO into the the inside of the coach and need to have the furnace checked out.

The moisture inside comes from your body (breath and perspiration), showers and cooking.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:17 PM   #5
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It is true that any fuel which is combusted will create moisture IN ITS EXHAUST. It will not create moisture inside your coach. If it does, you are leaking CO into the the inside of the coach and need to have the furnace checked out.

The moisture inside comes from your body (breath and perspiration), showers and cooking.
Try the PNW some time. At the same time watch the humidity gauge to see whether propane or electric gives lower readings. I've had four Airstreams in forty years, and am not dead from CO, yet.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:17 PM   #6
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Condensation is excessive humidity that condenses on cold surfaces. The humidity is created by showering, cooking, and breathing. Just let it out - crack the roofvent and crack open a window for a few hours. Yes, the furnace will run more while you do that, but it's part of camping when it's cold outside. When it happens again, do it again. On our first trip in a CCD Safari with the aluminum skin interior, the condensation on the walls soaked our bedding. We learned to leave a window and vent cracked. It is not nearly as much of a problem in our Bambi with the "mousefur" on the walls.
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Old 12-29-2011, 07:29 PM   #7
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Try the PNW some time. At the same time watch the humidity gauge to see whether propane or electric gives lower readings. I've had four Airstreams in forty years, and am not dead from CO, yet.

Struggling with the PNW acronym???????? Please spell that one out for me. Passing interior air over a sealed hot gas fired furnace heat exchanger will not create humidity. "Wet" fuels get "wet" by the hydrocarbons in the exhaust combining with oxygen in the air and forming H2O. Gasoline, diesel, natural gas are all wet fuels. If it's happening inside...that's a problem.

If what you say is true, my gas fired furnace in my house would keep my inside air nice and moist and I wouldn't have to run a HUMIDIFIER in my home most of the winter.
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:18 PM   #8
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When you cook on the propane stove you add to the condensation problem because the "exhaust" so to speak is released inside the trailer along with any moisture from the food or water you are heating. Unlike the furnace that gets the combustion air from the outside, then exhausts the spent fuel back outside.
Crack a window and open a vent. Don't worry about the heat loss. The cost of heating the trailer will be a lot less than the cost of removing the mold and other things that will grow in the moisture if you don't expel it. Not to mention the medical bills if you are allergic to this stuff.
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:54 PM   #9
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When you cook on the propane stove you add to the condensation problem because the "exhaust" so to speak is released inside the trailer along with any moisture from the food or water you are heating. Unlike the furnace that gets the combustion air from the outside, then exhausts the spent fuel back outside.
Crack a window and open a vent. Don't worry about the heat loss. The cost of heating the trailer will be a lot less than the cost of removing the mold and other things that will grow in the moisture if you don't expel it. Not to mention the medical bills if you are allergic to this stuff.

Very true. The reason I like a small Dehumidifier:

No additional heat loss with open window.

Consumes only about 200 watts (forget exact number)

The heat created by dehumidifier helps a little with heating trailer, thus reducing the 200 watt "penalty".

Provides variable setting to determine humidity level to my comfort without sacrificing with temperature variances.

Only my opinion and preference.
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Old 12-29-2011, 08:59 PM   #10
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This is the one I chose. Smallest compressor unit I could find. Only 16 lbs. 190 watts. Spec sheet at website.

NewAir AD-250 25 Pint Portable Room Dehumidifier With Automatic Shut-Off - FREE GROUND SHIPPING!

The only thing bad about this unit is it does not have a dehumidistat, so I had to get this:

Dayton 1UHG2 Dehumidifier Control, Plug In 120 V

This made the package pricier than some others, but it is substantially smaller and lighter.
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Old 12-29-2011, 10:03 PM   #11
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We are in Oregon and had tons of condensation our first time out winter camping....the last two times we just cracked the fantastic fan...and voila...problem solved! No condensation during the night...even with crock pot going, kettle and showers in the a.m....worked like a charm for us.
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Old 12-29-2011, 10:26 PM   #12
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We use a Soleux dehumidifier... its very quite and keeps everything very dry while warming the air. There are settings so it doesnt dry the air so much that you feel uncomfortable. This is the answer to winter camping.

Love your flying cloud... sure is a beauty!

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Old 12-29-2011, 10:45 PM   #13
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We are also in the PNW (pacific northwest). It can be very damp here. We have not any condensation problems in the three years we have been streaming. We do however always have the vent in our bedroom open at least a crack. Also I keep the window near the stove open a crack, and one of the front bedroom windows open slightly. Always use the fan in the shower, and generally use the fan over the stove. We have plenty of blankets for cold nights. Turn the heater off at night and turn it on early in the am-then hop back under the covers until we are heated up. We have been very cozy and hope that you will find your way to deal with this.
PS the reason that we keep several windows open is that a coworker and husband of my sister died from cobondition (sp) in there trailer. Needless to say we are a little overboard.
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Old 12-29-2011, 10:53 PM   #14
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We have the exact same trailer (nice outfit) you have and have been camping in AZ the last two months, similar overnight temps lately. We have not had a condensation problem. The condensation is from cooking, bathing, and simply breathing. We like to do all of these.

Minimize the moisture created by cooking with the range vent open and on, wipe the shower walls down when done, and hang towels outside to dry.

Keep the bath and shower vents open, and crack open the two roof vents an inch. Keep the trailer temp down at night and use an extra blanket. That should do it, if not also crack a window or run a roof vent fan on low.

I am a skeptic about the need for a dehumidifier unless simpler methods fail. And I don't like the noise of their compressor nor the lack of fresh air to breathe.

Don't fret over the small heat loss as that will be nothing to the costs of not ventilating. Your stick built house doesn't condensate for many reasons, mostly the much greater volume of air inside and more ventilation than you may realize.

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