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Old 09-06-2015, 09:36 PM   #15
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Glad they are ok. Inspecting tires at every stop is the best way to prevent problems. I am always finding screws and nails in tires before they go flat. Just paying attention to that nail head in a tire tread or seeing one tire sitting low compared to the others. I see tires running down the road all the time that are about to blow. Feel the tires, you can tell if one is running hot compared to the others. A blind man can tell you which tire is low on pressure. Maybe we need to carry a blind man with us to tell us which tire is low.

Perry
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:04 PM   #16
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Praying for your family.
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:04 PM   #17
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Prayers up!
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:43 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by AtomicNo13 View Post
Mankind survived for a hundred years prior to TPMS.Good tire maintenance, and dilligent observation is the key! Ive not had good luck with TMPS on many different vehicles. Its just a way to alert me that I just suffered a catastrophic failure and something bad/expensive happened!
Sorry about the unpleasant episode, glad nobody got hurt!
Tools, monitors and the like, that provide information of "any" kind promoting safety information, is always a 100 percent winner.

Motor vehicles today, are increasingly including such equipment, that airplanes have used for decades.

Unfortunately, a few folks consider those things as a waste.

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Old 09-07-2015, 10:03 AM   #19
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Hope all goes well for this guy. For the rest of us we should remember that heat kills rubber. As tires roll down the road they get hot from the friction of flexing. In the south part of the country the road is hot enough to cook on and the air is not much cooler by mid day. We cruise along in air conditioned comfort without a thought as to what is going on outside. My parents used to get up at the crack of stupid and be on the road by 4:00 AM. It was cooler then and we kids would sleep in the back seat. We had no air conditioning. By 2:00 PM they were done and would find a place with a pool to relax and stay cool. Driving during the cool of the early morning made sense for them. It still does.
Slowing down also reduces stress on tires and gives more time to deal with things that go wrong.
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Old 09-07-2015, 10:16 AM   #20
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What brand of TPMS do you use? Any problem getting a signal inside TV?
The TPMS I use is the Tire Minder. I run it on all 10 tires. It has helped me several times. Once on the TV and twice on the trailer. Two of those was low tire pressure (a screw in the front streetside trailer tire, and a nail in the front curbside TV tire), and once with high tire temperature on a rear curbside trailer tire that was beginning to lose its tread.

We have a 34' triple axle Avion, and we have no problems receiving the signal from the rear tires. The receiver is on the windshield next to the rearview mirror.

The accident happened in New Mexico, not Mexico. I can't say for sure that the TPMS would have saved him. The story will be in the shredded tire.

I certainly don't mean to be saying "Na Na, I told you so." And I understand the arguments that people have survived for decades without TPMS. But a walk-around would not have told me about the three TPMS warnings I got. I know that because I don't rely on the TPMS alarms to replace a walk-around. I do check tire pressure and temperature and thump every tire each time before I start, and there were no indications. I use the TPMS to check tire pressure and temp and they were all in proper range before the warnings, and there were no dull returns on the tire thumps.

But I follow the old rule "When you die, you're dead a long time." A TPMS seems awfully prudent, I think. I think it's possible that my brother would not have a broken back now if he had had one.

He's a wonderful guy and I love him dearly.
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Old 09-07-2015, 11:35 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtomicNo13 View Post
Mankind survived for a hundred years prior to TPMS.Good tire maintenance, and dilligent observation is the key! Ive not had good luck with TMPS on many different vehicles. Its just a way to alert me that I just suffered a catastrophic failure and something bad/expensive happened!
Sorry about the unpleasant episode, glad nobody got hurt!
Nobody got hurt? He broke his back and may be paralyzed.

Yes we got along for a long time without TPMS. We got along for a very long time without antibiotics, but I'd be dead today without them. One tread separation caught just in time by my TPMS was enough to pay for all I have spent. All was wonderful in St. Pete when I started, and the monitor went off within a 300 yards of the Sarasota pull off.
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Old 09-07-2015, 11:37 AM   #22
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One of the reasons I pull an AS rather than drive a motor home is that I lost a close friend to a front tire blowout on a motorhome. It blew only minutes after they had checked pressures on the tires and started on their way. On a two lane twisting road the left front tire blew. The husband told me that with full right on the steering it was still drifting to the left into oncoming traffic. He threw the wheel to the left and got across the road with only a sideswipe with and oncoming Class C. The passenger's window shattered and a shard went into his wife's brain as her head was against the window in the hard left turn.

I asked a friend who is an auto insurance investigator/adjustor and he said front blowouts are relatively common in Class A's. He recommended air pressure monitoring and (off the record) to never use anything less than a top of the line Michelin tire. He told me that neither he nor any other adjustor he knows has seen a properly inflated and not-overage Michelin blow on a Class A, while every other brand has a host of casualties. He told me that the tires normally on Class A's do not meet the same standards as are required on automobiles because the regulations do not cover them. He also said that Michelin elected to build their RV tires to the same regulatory standards as are required on passenger cars, one of the reasons they are so expensive.
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Old 09-07-2015, 12:02 PM   #23
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Certainly, depending on the circumstances, a TPMS "Might not have helped", but on the other hand, there is a fair chance that it might, so for the relative small investment involved, doesn't the use of one make sense?

I like to do what I can to improve my chances, even without any absolute guarantee!


Brian
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Old 09-07-2015, 12:35 PM   #24
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So sorry to read of your brother's experience. It's a nightmare experience we all fear driving our rigs. We do use the monitors with our diesel pusher and toad. Yes, it's one more monitor, but I'm OK with that.

We recently took a Spartan Chassis Owner's class that included driving instructions. That professional also told us to accelerate into a front blow out. Goes against everything instinctual, but seems to be the thing to do.

Speedy recovery to your brother. Keep us posted on his recovery.

Connie 'n Bruce
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Old 09-07-2015, 12:52 PM   #25
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Been there and done the broken back experience. Sure do hope he comes thru it ok with no lasting issues. I have the TPS system on my trailer and the Jeep GC has a built in monitoring system. Hopefully I will never have to test them in a full blown emergency situation but nice to know they are there if needed.
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Old 09-07-2015, 12:56 PM   #26
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Motorhomes have been notorious for overloading on the front tires. In many cases as soon as you add passengers you are in trouble. Some manufacturers have keyed on axle loads and when weighing is that based on an axle, you may be within specs. It's the individual wheel loading that gets you in trouble on these vehicles and in some cases specific wheel loads have exceeded the load ratings on tires. During a tire safety training session the presenter from RVSEF noted that they have experienced of these situations on motorhomes while at rallys where they provide vehicle weighing services. They use individual scales under each wheel to get a more accurate weight. They weighed my Safari and we were pretty close on all wheels other than the curb side rear tandem wheel carrying 40 lbs more. I never did figure out what that might have been caused by. Each wheel was safely within the tire manufacturers load specs.

So sorry to hear this happening. I know if I had a motor home I'd definitely do a weighing of each wheel separately based on the knowledge I got from that seminar. http://rvsafety.com/weighing/wheel-position-weighing

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Old 09-07-2015, 02:08 PM   #27
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Old 09-07-2015, 02:22 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loden View Post
He told me that the tires normally on Class A's do not meet the same standards as are required on automobiles because the regulations do not cover them. He also said that Michelin elected to build their RV tires to the same regulatory standards as are required on passenger cars, one of the reasons they are so expensive.
Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) apply to all motor vehicles. The FMVSS for tires apply to all tires. However, the standard for vehicles over 10,000 pounds GVWR are different than the standards for passenger cars, just like the standard for trailer tires is different from both. Not better, not worse, just different, and based on the characteristics of the general class of vehicle.

If you want the best tires for a Class A, get tires that meet the standards for passenger buses. A Greyhound bus racks up more miles in a year than an RV does in its entire life, and blowouts on those buses are rare, else multiple-fatality bus crashes would be daily news.
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