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Old 03-06-2008, 03:03 PM   #15
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Seems you could take the hit on tires, brakes and maintenance or go ahead and get the new truck you want.

Since you do a lot of miles and hope to upgrade in a year or two. I'd go get the Dodge. Sure you'll take an initial hit but towing with an oil burner sure is nice. Hills don't matter. More miles between fill ups and I think you can add an engine brake on Dodges so you're brakes will last longer and going down long steep grades will lose it's excitement.

Get what you want and you'll be happy longer.,
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Old 03-06-2008, 05:00 PM   #16
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I paid 30k for the silverado, it is one year old, my wife totalled our honda accord last Feb and i had to get something to replace it. So at the time there were no rebates, i will only get 16k for the trade that is black book. But it has 27k for miles and needs brakes and tires already, i tow quite a bit and will be going cross country april 15th or so. I know i'll take a beating but it is a great price on the dodge. Most likely we will get a bigger AS to spend winters in FL, nothing is set in stone though.

Rebee, could you tell me what mileage you get while towing? Thanks

By the end of this trip i will have close to 50k miles and it will be worth that much less, i mostly only use it for towing. So i'm figuring i will just get 5 years out of it if i'm lucky, diesels do last much longer. For the extra 13 i'd have a much beter towing machine. It's also a 2500 and my silverado is a 1500.
I'm just curious how you could need brakes at 27K? I've got a '95 Chevy Silverado with 150,000 miles on it and I'm still on the original rear brakes - having replaced the front discs once at about 85,000 miles! I don't use it for towing. My '03 GMC dually has over 50,000 miles on it with no readily noticeable signs of brake wear - and, for the record, the original set of dual tires. I will admit that I'm on my third set of front tires - but that's due to a weird wear pattern characteristic of the dually. The last set of front tires I put on will probably last over 100,000 miles. The dually tows about 50% of the time.
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Old 03-06-2008, 06:57 PM   #17
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My six-speed 2WD Quadcab longbed averages:

Solo
17-19 in-town
22+ highway (66-68 mph)

Towing (62-63 mph)
13 towing back roads
15+ on Interstates

(I've never run a full day on the Interstate for fuel mileage without going through major citiies (Dallas, Austin, San Antonio), but I imagine I'd hit 16 on a full day of cruise control.

I haven't seen better than this on a 30+ foot trailer, conventional or fifth wheel though I have seen as high as 18 on a small rig.

A Silver Streak trailer has more frontal area than an Airstream that is "squared".

My truck has a bed topper (truck roof height), and the Hensley Hitch puts the trailer waay back there. The "gap" between truck and trailer is right at five feet. (The rig is a bit over sixty-two feet). That "gap" represents at least one mpg I'm betting.

I always drive for economy, rarely get above 2,100 rpm (maybe three/four times in a typical 900-mile month around town).

I shift progressively (1600 on the one/two, 1700 on the two/three and use 1800 for fourth & fifth, then 1900 when I drop it into OD), downshift through fourth, sometimes third (always trying to keep from stopping, the BIG penalty on city mpg in a four-ton pickup) and only use the throttle to move between the gears as I consider the trans my speed apportioner.

In town, on the highway or anywhere else I keep the engine in the 1600-1900 rpm range exclusively.

The price differential -- on fuel only ($3.60 D vs. $3.00 G) -- means I easily beat my 2001 1/2T Dodge in fuel economy savngs; nearly $90 month at 1,000 miles.

The 2003/2004 CTD is generally regarded as having the best mpg of post 2002 CTD's.

My only change from stock is an Amsoil Eaa air filter, a Rokktech muffler with Aeroturbine resonator. All else is stock.
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Old 03-06-2008, 07:03 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Cracker
I'm just curious how you could need brakes at 27K? I've got a '95 Chevy Silverado with 150,000 miles on it and I'm still on the original rear brakes - having replaced the front discs once at about 85,000 miles! I don't use it for towing. My '03 GMC dually has over 50,000 miles on it with no readily noticeable signs of brake wear - and, for the record, the original set of dual tires. I will admit that I'm on my third set of front tires - but that's due to a weird wear pattern characteristic of the dually. The last set of front tires I put on will probably last over 100,000 miles. The dually tows about 50% of the time.

The drum brakes in the back are probably alright, but the front discs need to be done before we go on the trip out west. The brake disc has groves in it, probably some piece of junk made in china. The guy who will do the work told me that the replacements would be better. Also on the 1500 model they use cheap general tires, three flats so far and they don't wear well. I also have a 98 dodge ram 130k miles, it doesn't have the power, but i have only changed the brakes once. I have only had the front end aligned once, the chevy front end is already out of whack. The dodge took much more of a beating and still runs great. On the new 1500 model, i think GM uses cheap break parts and cheap tires. JMO
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Old 03-06-2008, 09:02 PM   #19
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We have a 2005 Dodge 5.9 Cummings, short wheelbase, 2WD, with camper shell. On the highway, not towing we get 20-23 mpg, in town not towing 17-19 mpg, towing we will average 15-16 mpg. We traveled 13,000 miles last year with the trailer and kept very accurate records. We have friends with 3/4 ton gasoline trucks and our diesel milage is better than theirs. After having towed with a diesel it would be very difficult for me to go back to a gasoline truck.
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Old 03-06-2008, 10:37 PM   #20
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A couple of thoughts for you.

If you change your tires on the Suburban to 245/70R x 17" Load Range "D" Light Truck tires you should pick up 1 mile per gallon both towing and solo. As well handling and performance will both improve.

I would not assume that the 5.3 will have any less durability than a diesel as most gas engines seem to still be running when the rest of the truck has worn out. If your brakes are worn out already you likely have a brake control problem. I have found the brakes on our Diesels do not last as long as the brakes on our gas trucks. This would make sence considering the extra weigth to stop and the lack of engine brakeing.

Another thought is that the current deisel trucks really are somewhat dated and much better engines will be available in soon. In fact the 3.0 Litre in the M class and Jeep Grand Cherokee is available now. If you want better fuel economy that is a better way to go. These are runing in the high teens towing 30-34's and high 20's solo.

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Old 03-06-2008, 11:13 PM   #21
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07 5.7 liter Tundra four wheel drive towing ~ 14 MPG
03 7.3 liter Ford E 350 diesel towing ~ 13 MPG
Difference: Tundra tows where Ford can't because of X4 and gearing. Gets hot but compensates by pulling uphill really solw. Big plus, it's comfortable., smaller fuel tank seems like we save money when we fill up, but we're not. Negative eats tires, 35,000 or less.
Ford more power goes up hill faster but engine and tranny can get hot but never quits because of the jet engine sounding cooling fan that kicks in. Negative is that it's loud so we wear ear plugs. Cost $ 144.00 to fill tank. Positive, good tire milage. 80,000 plus
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Old 03-07-2008, 06:09 AM   #22
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Hi Tinsel

What size tires do you have on your Tundra there might be a tire you can use that will last longer.

When you say it gets hot. is the coolant temperature rising on hills?

Andy
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Old 03-07-2008, 09:34 AM   #23
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'A couple of thoughts for you.

If you change your tires on the Suburban to 245/70R x 17" Load Range "D" Light Truck tires you should pick up 1 mile per gallon both towing and solo. As well handling and performance will both improve.

I would not assume that the 5.3 will have any less durability than a diesel as most gas engines seem to still be running when the rest of the truck has worn out. If your brakes are worn out already you likely have a brake control problem.'

Hi Andy, If i don't buy the new truck i will put on Mich 245/70r 17 load range E. They cost more but i don't want any flats if i can help it. I didn't know going to a higher rated load range would get better gas mileage. I learn something everyday, thanks.

The reason i was even thinking of a new truck right now is we are going on a big cross country trip out west. After reading a bunch of threads here, i am getting nervous that i will have problems going up some of the mountain passes with my 5.3 silverado and my 23 fter. It has 315hp with 338ftlbs T.

Now i'm wondering if dieasel is as dependable as a gasser, after reading lots of threads here. I would imagine the 5.9l is much more dependable than the ford for sure.

I have been to Big Bend and there were a couple pretty good grades and i did just fine, but have never driven up some of the huge ones out west. The engine seems very very strong compared to my 98 dodge, brakes well too. One other problem i have with the diesel is i drive fast, i get 11.8 and above gas mileage towing going 75++. Most of the time i'm passing big rigs except on grades. In the city i drive slow in case i need to brake. It was the highest rated truck for gas mileage at 22 hiway. At 55-60 i would get great mileage, but that isn't happening soon. thanks George
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Old 03-07-2008, 11:14 AM   #24
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Quote:
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I have a 2007 silverado with a 5.3l. I was thinking of getting a dodge ram megacab with a diesel 2 wheel drive, 3.73 gears. It is a 2007 with a 5.9 l, i was wondering what kind of mileage i would get when towing and without towing? The price is great, for a brand new slt, it's 28.700, I wonder if i could get better than 11.8 average miles per gallon towing that i get with the silverado. Thanks for the help.
You would get better milage but you are going to have to to do the math. The cost of diesel is above premium gas. A diesel for towing unless you really need the power does look that great right now.
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Old 03-07-2008, 12:57 PM   #25
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01 F250, 2wd, 7.3L diesel: 17mpg hi-way towing 1969 Sovereign 31' at 60mph ;17mpg not towing anything hi-way at 70mph. I tow at 60, for tires and wind-effects, and drive at 70 when not towing, 'cause I can.
cheers, bill b.
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Old 03-08-2008, 06:58 AM   #26
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The "D" range tires will give you a little better driving feel than the "E" range. Your rims are rated for 50 PSI so don't run more than that in them even though the tires are rated for 65. The advantage here is that the 245's have less rolling resistance than the stock 265's and the LT configuration has a stiffer sidewall.

Here in Canada we have had high fuel prices for many years so very few of our customers have ever towed with big block engines. Over the years we have towed with hundreds of Suburbans like yours and our customers go everywhere with their 34' Airstreams. The big hills out west will mean you downshift once in a while but there are none that you cannot climb with plenty of margin. Make sure you downsift going down as well. If you are using the brakes going down a hill then you are in the wrong gear.

I am a bit like you and I tend to drive much faster than I should. We have a Duramax Diesel for towing fifth wheels (somehow putting an Airstream on it is like putting a lift kit and off road tires on a Ferrari). After spending some time on the test track with it however I don't like to drive it 75 solo as I know it has no margin for evasive maneuvers and the stopping distance gets really looong.

When I look at it logically once you are over about 65 MPH towing you just about break even on extra time in gas stations vs time saved on the road. Still sometimes when I am out there with the 300C and a 34 I can't resist a little "show and tell". Here is a picture of an Airstream larger than yours at the top of the biggest hill I have found.
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Old 03-08-2008, 07:02 AM   #27
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It is hard to read the sign with the picture at that size. That is Independence pass in Colorado which is the back way into Aspen. The pass is 12,100'. The Airstream is a 1987 25' loaded for travel with water etc. The car is a 1987 Oldsmobile 88 with a 3.8 Litre V/6. The car ran much better at that altitude than I did.

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Old 03-08-2008, 07:53 AM   #28
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It is hard to read the sign with the picture at that size. That is Independence pass in Colorado which is the back way into Aspen. The pass is 12,100'. The Airstream is a 1987 25' loaded for travel with water etc. The car is a 1987 Oldsmobile 88 with a 3.8 Litre V/6. The car ran much better at that altitude than I did.

Andy

Wow, that makes me feel a little better! Like you said i'll just have to go a little slower up the mountains. I decided last night to keep this truck and wait for a couple of years to see how the new trucks coming out will do for mileage.

I did visit the dealer and they told me my rims will take a E rated tire fine. I also called Michelin and asked them the same question, they said you will have no problem with the factory wheels for that truck, with 80lbs or pressure. I will order 245/70r/17E LTX AS kind of expensive but i'd rather be safe than sorry. I'm thinking of getting new tires for the AS too, it seems like a lot of people have had problems with the goodyear tires. I have 15k miles with them though with no problems. They still look like they are in great shape. Here is the dealer with the new 2007 with 5.9l if anyone is looking for one. 28,700 seems like a great deal.

Arrigo Dodge Chrysler Jeep - West Palm Beach area Dodge Chrysler Jeep dealer in West Palm Beach Florida. Stuart Jeep parts dealer. Jupiter Jeep dealer cars parts, Wellington Jeep Dodge Chrysler dealer cars parts, Lake Worth FL Jeep Dodge Chrysler dea
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