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Old 07-22-2005, 01:20 PM   #1
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Leveling strategy

I just had an idea on how to more easily level my trailer when parked at home. I want to check it out with the all knowing forum first. I park my 25' CCD at my house and use it as an additional living space. I call it the silver room.

Unfortunately there are no really level spaces to park. Up to now leveling has involved bulding a series of ramp from leveler blocks and repeated attempts to back on to them. It takes a while. The problem with the leveling is that I need to raise both sides of the trailer enough that I can lower the front to compensate for the fore and aft slope of the parking space. Then I have to have the street side higher than the curbside to level left to right.

Anyway, here's the idea. What if I park the trailer where I want it, jack up one side, slide in the leveler blocks and lower the trailer on to the blocks. Then repeat for the other side. I think I'd get those between the wheel expanding wheel chock devices just to make locking the wheels a more sure thing. Is there a flaw to my plan?

Thanks,

Cam
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Old 07-22-2005, 01:35 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hit'the'road
I just had an idea on how to more easily level my trailer when parked at home. I want to check it out with the all knowing forum first. I park my 25' CCD at my house and use it as an additional living space. I call it the silver room.

Unfortunately there are no really level spaces to park. Up to now leveling has involved bulding a series of ramp from leveler blocks and repeated attempts to back on to them. It takes a while. The problem with the leveling is that I need to raise both sides of the trailer enough that I can lower the front to compensate for the fore and aft slope of the parking space. Then I have to have the street side higher than the curbside to level left to right.

Anyway, here's the idea. What if I park the trailer where I want it, jack up one side, slide in the leveler blocks and lower the trailer on to the blocks. Then repeat for the other side. I think I'd get those between the wheel expanding wheel chock devices just to make locking the wheels a more sure thing. Is there a flaw to my plan?

Thanks,

Cam
What if you built wider leveling blocks to make backing up onto them easier?

Bill
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Old 07-22-2005, 01:47 PM   #3
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Sounds like trouble to me. You would be jacking it up, letting it down, needed more or less and jacking it up. And that doesn't take into consideration the damage you may do by jacking up the whole side.

Here's an easier way. Figure where you want to park. Get a 10 foot 2x4 to put side to side. Put on end where the up hill tire will be and put a level on the down hill end and then level the 2x4. Measure the distance from the ground to the bottom of the 2x4. Now figure how high you need the whole thing to go up. Say it's 4 inches. Build a set of 2x12 blocks for each side to get the heights you need. One will be the how high you need it and the other how high you need it plus the down hill measurement. Divide the heights by 1.5, that's how many blocks up need. Make one long enough for both axels plus about two feet for comfort. Now make each one 6 inches longer until you have the right number. Now all you have to do it put them in the same place ( or leave them there). Use the distance between the center of the tires to place the blocks. You should be able to back up right onto the blocks with some practise. Cover the blocks with outdoor grass carpet and it all will look pretty.
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Old 07-22-2005, 02:54 PM   #4
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I use 2X8 planks on top of each other and secured with screws. The base plank is 6" longer front and back than the one on top of it and the top is slightly longer than both tires on that side of the trailer. The ends were cut with a slight slope. I just back onto them where my driveway is sloping down and it levels it just fine.

You didn't say that it was parked on a concrete, asphalt, gravel driveway or on the grass. If it is on gravel or grass, I would dig down on the high side and place landscape timbers or railroad ties as a border for the higher area. This way it would be easier to park the trailer level.
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Old 07-22-2005, 03:32 PM   #5
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Building the ramps you need is probably the way to go. I think jacking it up would be difficult because you would have to jack it up much higher than it needs to be lifted, because of sag when you get the wheels in the air. Also, I don't think you should jack up an AS if you can help it at all! Leveling out the ground would be even better.

With practice you will have no problem hitting those ramps perfectly. My husband backs the trailer up into it's spot after a trip and usually has the tires in the same depressions they left from last time! I don't know how he does it, but it's just practice practice practice!
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Old 07-22-2005, 08:33 PM   #6
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Great advice

Thank you all for the great advice. I'll have to put my engineering skills to work and see if I can build a more permanent ramp set up. The trouble with the little yellow blocks is that I sort of have to redesign it every time and I still can't get it high enough for the fore and aft slope. I don't want to go any hight on those little block because it just doesn't look like a safe/good idea. I may be getting back to you all with more design questions.

Thanks,

Cam
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Old 07-23-2005, 05:07 AM   #7
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roto chocks

Ramps are the way to go rather than jacking up the trailer. However permanent ramps may be dificult if the ramps are higher than the clearance under the trailer.

When you go to purchase the wedges for between the wheels. Look at the RotoChock. We purchased a pair two years ago and for ease of use and security they are the best. I can't even remember where the ramp chocks are. Google rotochocks and you will find them online.

Mark
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Old 07-23-2005, 06:42 AM   #8
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TEE HEEE

Re-build your driveway - sorry I could not resist

glad we have a fairly level one - just gravel sure wish it was paved.

No help from me I;m afraid - just sympaty - as I know what it is like to sleep on a slant
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Old 07-23-2005, 08:58 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjoandall
Ramps are the way to go rather than jacking up the trailer. However permanent ramps may be dificult if the ramps are higher than the clearance under the trailer.
Mark
Excellent piont, I missed that. If the clearance is OK have a concrete guy come and built you nice level ramps
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