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Old 03-24-2008, 08:43 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silver&gold
Not saying you need to go to Elk City but if you do you will see wildlife like Yellow Stone. On the river going in there are free camping sites everywhere and they are georgious. Fishing will probably be Chinook Salmon while you are there.
Deb
I was checking out this area on my Delmore Atlas today and I have to say it looks like a neat place. I am really looking forward to seeing that country! Thanks for the tip! Do you think the area there is worth a week?
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Old 03-24-2008, 08:51 PM   #72
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I got the impression that the closure had to do with management of the elk herd.
You know, that could well be. I do know that they close a lot of forest roads between here and Taos during elk mating seasons.


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Old 03-24-2008, 08:59 PM   #73
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Unhappy Starting to worry some

I keep hearing all these stories about heavy snow packs up and down the Rockies. With my early start this year, I am concerned that I won't get to see a lot of areas that I want to get into. Hopefully, this is just me being a worry wart and the high country will be accessible.

My memory from the late 80s is that by Memorial day the lower elevations (below 9K) were clear with snow hanging on above that. To hear people talk there won't be a summer this year
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Old 03-24-2008, 09:25 PM   #74
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The snowpack is pretty incredible this year. Here in the lower Sangre de Cristos, we're running up to 180% of normal. Over in the run-off areas below the San Juans (essentially along the banks of the San Juan River), they're very concerned about flooding once the melt really gets rolling. Same holds true over in other areas: Flooding is a real concern.

But the river rafting outfits are really happy about it!


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Old 03-24-2008, 09:26 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gen Disarray
I was checking out this area on my Delmore Atlas today and I have to say it looks like a neat place. I am really looking forward to seeing that country! Thanks for the tip! Do you think the area there is worth a week?
I think you will want to be there for a week. You might decide to spend even more time in the area.
Have a great trip and keep us all posted.
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Old 03-24-2008, 11:41 PM   #76
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A reprint for Yellowstone anglers,

Troubled waters hit Yellowstone

By Charlie Meyers
The Denver Post

Article Last Updated: 03/22/2008 11:04:50 PM MDT


var requestedWidth = 0; if(requestedWidth < 200){ requestedWidth = 200; } Tributaries at the south end of Yellowstone Lake once produced fine trout nearly every cast. Populations have been severely reduced by lake trout predation and, now, by whirling disease. (Charlie Meyers, Denver Post file photo )



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There's trouble in Paradise.
Literally.
Early results from studies of whirling disease infection in populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout indicate an extreme level of susceptibility that spells trouble for one of the nation's most treasured trout locations.
Nowhere is the concern greater than in Paradise Valley, the spectacularly scenic and fish-fertile reach of the Yellowstone River where it flows from Yellowstone National Park downstream to Livingston, Mont.
Early research reveals that the disease fatal to young trout has made its way into two-thirds of the tributaries that provide the bulk of reproduction for this internationally famous fishing area.
For Colorado anglers who love fishing for Yellowstone cutthroat, both in and outside the park, this news is not good. Worse, lab testing has shown the Yellowstone cutthroat to be six to seven times more susceptible to the malady than rainbow trout.
"What concerns me is the susceptibility level," said Dick Vincent, whirling disease research coordinator with the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks. "That's scary. If they're going to be bothered by such a small exposure, we're in a lot of trouble."
The worry began some time ago farther upstream in Yellowstone Lake, where this celebrated native trout suffers a double-edged attack. Much has been discussed about an explosion of lake trout chewing away at what once was the most remarkable fishery in the region.
Yellowstone National Park officials have removed more than 270,000 lake trout over the past 13 years, 73,000 in 2007 alone, in an effort that has cost $3 million. More recently, the National Park Service has formed a partnership with Trout Unlimited and the U.S. Geological Survey to develop an alternative method to eliminate the illegally introduced lake trout.
At the same time, whirling disease has taken a less-publicized, but perhaps more profound, toll. Dave Kumlien, executive director of the Bozeman,
Chime in With Charlie

Post outdoors editor Charlie Meyers posts entries on this blog devoted to hunting and fishing. Visit it here.


Mont.-based Whirling Disease Foundation, reports that a major lake tributary, Pelican Creek, no longer produces young trout. Similar problems exist in Clear Creek and other tributaries.
"This thing about infection in the Yellowstone River in Montana hasn't really been in the media, but it will cause a great deal of concern," Kumlien said. "This river has a great constituency — anglers, guides, shops, landowners."
By official estimate, the Yellowstone cutthroat now occupies less than 43 percent of its historic range, in large part because of introduction of competing non-native trout and environmental degradation. Like all native trout, including those in Colorado, it is highly impacted by exotics such as rainbow and brook trout.
Now comes this latest threat posed by whirling disease, far greater to cutthroat that cannot be hybridized with more resistant strains.
"There's no way to get that genie back into the jar," said Vincent, who also lamented a general lack of information about the Yellowstone subspecies. Charlie Meyers: 303-954-1609 or cmeyers@denverpost.com
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is really sad!
Don
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Old 03-25-2008, 08:50 AM   #77
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Rocky Mt NP

I last visited RMNP back in '86 at the end of May. Came in the east entrance and did a hike up to the lake below Longs Peak. Thats about all I remember about the park.

I expect to travel through Colorado south to north on the trip. My question for those of you with fresher experience is this: is RMNP significantly different from what I will be seeing in the rest of the state to be a must see, or is it a destination largely because of the fact that it is a national park? So what makes the park special. Also, I was thinking that if I do visit, I might concentrate on the west side of the park rather than the east. So what can you all tell me?
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Old 03-27-2008, 11:46 AM   #78
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I'm suprised

I thought I would hear a lot of comments about RMNP. Maybe the lack of comments should tell me that it really isn't all that spectacular in comparison to other parts of the state.
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Old 03-27-2008, 12:33 PM   #79
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That, or the fact that, like me, we have no idea what RMNP means/is/stands for.
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Old 03-27-2008, 01:48 PM   #80
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That, or the fact that, like me, we have no idea what RMNP means/is/stands for.
That would be Rocky Mountian National Park
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Old 03-28-2008, 09:27 AM   #81
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Getting in Hot Water: WY

I have been looking through a couple hot spring guides for the trip and have come across a couple that meet my critera for looking into (undeveloped and near camping).

The first one I want to ask about is the Granite Falls hot spring in WY. It is located south east of Jackson on the Hogback river off Hwy 189/191. (DeLorme pg 48 C-3)

The second one is Kelly Warm Springs located in the Gros Ventre area near Jackson (DeLorme pg 48, B-2).

Anybody know these springs? Man I love hot springs
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Old 03-28-2008, 10:12 AM   #82
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Rodney,

Perhaps because we lived fairly close to RMNP, I never thought it particularly amazing. We already lived in the mountains though. It gets really busy in the summer and the main road (Trail Ridge Rd.) through won't open until around Memorial Day. Sometimes snow closes it for a short time after that. Driving through Estes Park (east portal) is a big traffic jam. The Colorado mountains are amazing everywhere, and if it's midsummer, there are plenty of places to see mountains. If I wanted to go to RMNP, I'd wait until September. Yellowstone is much better. Since the feds keep raising the admission prices, there are fewer people going to NP's and National Monuments. I'm old enough to get in free, but I would only visit a limited number of parks and monuments if I had to pay for them. Quite a few are way overpriced now and gas price adds insult to the injury.

Wyoming (and the rest of the west) have lots of hot springs. I haven't been to the ones you mention. Thermopolis, Wyo., has a free public hot spring, but the attendant (15 years ago) chases people out after while (claiming it's dangerous to stay in too long). But who can argue with free? There are books on hot springs all over the west. You could make a long trip just going from hot spring to hot spring. We have hiked many miles to go to remote ones in the national forest and those were some of the most memorable. Conundrum HS is 8 miles hiking to 11,000 feet SW of Aspen, but a spectacular place at tree line. Last time we went, around 1990, there was a self important forest service ranger there watching to make sure no one broke a rule. It's hard to take a ranger seriously when he's naked—clothing very optional there. You'd have to take your TV only to the trailhead, no way to get a trailer turned around. It was the most memorable HS, but busy (and quite a hike). From there, 3 miles up to Triangle Pass (13,000') where you can see mountains going forever in every direction. Living in Okla., you may need oxygen.

I thought you were going to stay close to home to save on gas. Changing your mind? Seems like we all consider staying close to home when gas goes up, then the road calls…

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Old 03-28-2008, 10:51 AM   #83
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Rodney,

I thought you were going to stay close to home to save on gas. Changing your mind? Seems like we all consider staying close to home when gas goes up, then the road calls…

Gene
Thanks for the information Gene, I kinda suspected that RMNP was like you said. I killed my spring break trip to Big Bend due to fuel prices (the cost to time ratio wasn't good) but I expect to be in the rockies all summer. I really want to see Idaho. How weird is that?
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Old 03-28-2008, 12:42 PM   #84
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Quote:
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Thanks for the information Gene, I kinda suspected that RMNP was like you said. I killed my spring break trip to Big Bend due to fuel prices (the cost to time ratio wasn't good) but I expect to be in the rockies all summer. I really want to see Idaho. How weird is that?
VERY

But that's okay 'cause it's a beautiful State with many unique things to see and do. You most likely will have fun.

Barry
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