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Old 10-18-2016, 11:54 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Hittenstiehl View Post
Am following this and previous threads about proper downhill descent methods.

In our Chevy pickup we have PRND321 and a Tow Haul button.

Don't understand this comment and have seen it previously: you go down the same gear you go up. Well I went up the hill in D/Drive....?
I think it means, for example, if your TV drops to 2nd gear to go up a grade, you should also go down the grade in 2nd gear (not 3rd or higher), by manually shifting to 2nd gear. This is to take advantage of engine braking.

As for downhill speed control best practices, I use Mountain Directory app (http://www.mountaindirectory.com/) and identify steep inclines/declines before hand. They have separate apps for East/West coast.

Going up is usually much easier (I use cruise control, and lower the speed depending on the grade). Going down, I reduce my speed to the suggested truck speed limit, manually down shift the transmission, and start the descent (I do not use cruise control). I have not been to the west coast, but we seem to have some challenging hills in the Appalachians. Going down a 2 mile 10% grade, I downshift to 2nd gear, reduce my speed to 30 MPH, and let the RPMs climb up. Right at the point where the transmission is about to up shift to 3rd gear, I apply the brakes to reduce the speed. I repeat these steps. Going down a 2 mile long 10% grade, I had to apply the brakes around 5 times. I prefer to follow a semi in the right most lane.
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Old 10-18-2016, 12:00 PM   #16
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Thx Rostam that's a bit clearer.
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Old 10-18-2016, 12:14 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by avionstream View Post
Front hitch on truck, go forward up the driveway.
Yes, i guess i forgot to mention that once up the driveway, the width of the pavement in front of garage is not large enough to allow me to go up TV first, position the RV on the good spot, unhitch and drive the TV around and away back to the road. I need to go up AS first, backing up.
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Old 10-18-2016, 01:55 PM   #18
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I think that's what he is saying. You would go Airstream first, back/butt end up first. Then unhitch and back your tow vehicle back down the driveway.

So you are mounting a tow hitch on the front of your tow vehicle and pushing your baby up instead of pulling but still going the same direction.
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Old 10-18-2016, 02:04 PM   #19
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That's it. Hook thr trailer to the front hitch and drive forward pushing the trailer.
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Old 10-18-2016, 02:42 PM   #20
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Most if not all front receivers are not capable of the TW of one of these trailers.


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Old 10-18-2016, 05:26 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avionstream View Post
That's it. Hook thr trailer to the front hitch and drive forward pushing the trailer.
I had no idea one can put the receiver of the hitch on the front of the TV, never saw it done either. That looks a very interesting (even crazy) proposition, but... crazy surprised me before and was right! . Thank you, will try tomorrow morning.
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Old 10-18-2016, 05:35 PM   #22
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It's unusual but more common than we realize. It's very handy for moving things around while facing them.

Etrailer sells them and Carid had an interesting article on its possible uses.
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Old 10-18-2016, 05:36 PM   #23
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Indeed, I just saw several models online, that seems to be a solution for my issue. Anyone with experience pushing (towing) a trailer up a curving driveway? How challenging is it?

Thanks for the idea, this can make it possible for me to get tomorrow the F350 ( I fly to Europe Friday, don't have much time to decide).
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:24 PM   #24
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Most if not all front receivers are not capable of the TW of one of these trailers.
I would think moving a trailer is different than towing a trailer. I'm not an engineer and don't know how to calc these things, but I know the speeds are way different, thus less the bouncing around and I would imagine that would have to be taken into account. Moving a trailer on a front hitch at slow speeds for a relatively short distance should be fine.

I know at our previous "city" lot, we had to use a measly garden tractor with a ball welded to the back to move our trailer from the alley into it's parking space....I'm certain it wasn't qualified to tow our trailer - but it worked to move it.

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Old 10-18-2016, 06:30 PM   #25
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Hi Vitaver! Are you going to get 4 wheel drive? Can you run a wheel off the pavement while turning without tearing up some expensive landscaping? A front hitch is probably the way to go but if your driveway is real steep you might spin the rear tires without enough weight on the drive wheels. You could put a few barrels of water or some sand bags in the bed if you need more traction, or shift to 4 low if the truck has it. Be careful not to bind the 4WD drive train on a paved surface going frontwards or backwards. Also years ago a transmission guy told me the main reason for fried GM Turbo 400's was people backing heavy things up onto leveling blocks because most automatics were geared higher in reverse than in low. If your driveway is steep you might want to check TV specs. carefully. Years ago my neighbor had a really steep concrete driveway about 200 feet long and unusually steep; and owned a front wheel drive GMC motor-home. He could get almost to the top where it was flat by smoking the tires and leaving some long black streaks of rubber going forward. He made it to the flat area a few times by backing up but then he had to get the transmission rebuilt. After 2 transmissions and a couple of tires on the front he rented a storage spot. It took years for the tire marks to go away! Man, I wish I had video of the frontal assaults on that driveway but it was before You-Tube!
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Old 10-18-2016, 06:49 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Alluminati View Post
Got my first taste of steep descent with a trailer two weeks ago on a drive to the west coast followed by a tour around Yellowstone. We crossed the Continental Divide several times in a matter of days. Dunraven Pass was our highest elevation at 8,859 ft. But the longest steepest descents were on the interstate. One hill in Montana had a 25 mph speed limit for trucks over 12,000 lbs. (Iím nearly 16,000 lbs.)



MrUKToad is correct. Select your speed BEFORE you begin the descent. What other drivers think of your speed is none of your business. Would you rather have them angry for getting stuck behind you, or think you are a fool for flying downhill too fast? If youíre going too fast, those who think you are a fool are correct.



I have a CDL with passenger endorsement, but was unable to be tested on steep hills since there are none in my area. Our recent trip put that technical knowledge to good use. The CORRECT way to descend is brake BEFORE the hill. Most major roadways will have a sign telling you 5, 6, or 7%. This will tell you what gear you need, and how much braking you will do. I learned that with my setup, 5% feels good at 50-60 mph, 6% 35-45 mph, and 7% 25-35 mph. At 6%, I brake to 35 before the hill, and put my 6 speed tranny in 3rd. DONT TOUCH THE BRAKE until the truck reaches 45. Then press the brake firmly (no jabbing) to slow the truck from 45 back to 35. Then take your foot OFF the brake while it slowly climbs back to 45.



If the truck races back to your top speed, you are in the wrong gear. Brake to the right speed, and downshift further. As long as you are not violating your redline, the scream of your racing engine is perfectly harmless, and using no more gas than you do at idle. (I had to reassure my alarmed wife repeatedly.)



Riding your brake lightly produces enormous heat with nearly zero benefit. The heat will cause brake failure without causing a fire. You wonít know youíve lost your brakes until you really need them. Jabbing the brakes could jackknife your trailer.



When descending at reasonable speed, the load PUSHING on your trailer hitch is the same as the load PULLING on your hitch when you are accelerating normally. When braking normally on a steep hill (ex. from 45 down to 35) your trailer brakes are engaged normally, and your load will remain straight.

Very good post, Alluminati!
I use the same techniques with our 5675 lb FC23FB behind our Jeep GC Diesel 8 sp. Developed through experience living here in CO and crossing many of the steep passes, at times in less than desirable conditions. Been caught descending in sudden hailstorms in July!
No embarrassment in going slow in the right lane with flashers on.

Safe Travels,
Joe
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Old 10-18-2016, 08:40 PM   #27
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Thank you, makes sense. Indeed a search for those front hitches shows that the max tongue weight is 500 pounds.
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Old 10-18-2016, 09:26 PM   #28
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Hi iJustlee, it will be a 4X4. The 750 pounds of the tongue over the front hitch should give those tires enough traction I suppose. The rear tires will have more weight (and traction) dues to gravity (is not just a good idea, is the law! . There is no good landscaping but a retaining wall on one side, and a steep 'fall' on the other, so I need to do it right. Yes, if it proves too challenging, after trying my best, I may end up placing her with a good neighbor next door who volunteered space, he has a 2 acre lot. Thanks!
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