Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-13-2014, 07:43 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,412
Crowdsourcing a Medical Emergencies Checklist

Maggie's recent posts about Doug's tragic passing have no doubt touched us all. I've never met them but feel so connected through this forum. And on that point - we've all had our long debates about hitches, tires, tow vehicles, etc., but the outpouring of unity, compassion, love, prayers and helpful offers to support a family in need has been wonderfully affirming. It both humbles me, and makes me proud to be a part of such a community (if that makes sense).

Through all the emotions their story evokes, perhaps some of us wondered (as I did) - what if that were me/us? Would we know what to do? We talk about checklists for setting up and tearing down camp, but what about checklists for situations we hope we are never in - but would need in that moment desperately when there isn't time to think or make it up on the fly?

So I thought we could gather the collective wisdom of this wonderfully thoughtful group to help compile a comprehensive list of tools, apps, providers, tips, actions, etc. to be prepared for something we all hope never happens.

I'll start the next reply with a list of questions to begin compiling the "kit". If you have other questions that can help build a kit feel free to add them. And of course, thanks in advance for answering these questions and sharing your wisdom. As this thread evolves, perhaps we'll get to a place where we can have a fairly definitive approach/toolkit that can become a "sticky" and be a helpful aid to campers for years to come.
__________________

__________________
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 07:44 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,412
QUESTIONS TO BUILD OUR MEDICAL EMERGENCY KIT

If you already have a medical emergency plan/checklist already, please post.

I also suppose some of these questions would be answered differently if you were in transit vs. at camp...

1) in the event of a medical emergency, what is the first thing you must do?
2) is there anything you should not do or should stop doing?
3) if you have an existing condition, allergy, medication, etc., how are you prepared to inform others (e.g., first responders) if you're unable to communicate for any reason?
4) what materials must you carry with you in your rig? (e.g., first aid kits, emergency signaling tools, etc.)
5) what materials must you carry on your person when on an excursion (hiking, biking, kayaking, etc) ?
6) who (generically) should you inform of your travel plans in advance of your trip and what information should you share with them?
7) who (generically) would you want to be contacted and how would that happen if you we're unable to reach out?
8 ) what information should you provide campground management on your arrival?
9) if you travel with a spouse, children, friends, parents, pets; what role should they play and how should they be taken care of (e.g., be taken care of at the campsite, join you at the hospital, get back home, etc.) ? Is there something they need to know in advance?
10) is someone in your party trained in CPR?
11) what apps are most helpful in medical emergencies and why?
12) what services/service providers are most helpful and why?

What other questions - and answers - should we consider to be prepared?
__________________

__________________
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 08:03 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
andreasduess's Avatar
 
1984 34' International
Toronto , Ontario
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,496
Images: 5
Blog Entries: 1
What a great idea for a thread.

From my years working with the film industry, I've learned that you always know two things when going on a shoot: the weather and the location of the nearest hospital.

Both of these are at the top of every single call sheet I've ever seen.

When we go camping, I make sure to know both of the above.

Also, basic first aid and CPR training is something everybody should be able to perform.
__________________
andreasduess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 08:11 PM   #4
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,412
I don't have answers to all these questions but here are a few.

1) in the event of a medical emergency, what is the first thing you must do?

I'm assuming dial 911 but when traveling and with cell phones, I'm not sure you always get to the most local first responders. If others are around you would likely want to tell someone to dial 911 and someone else to notify the campsite office while you tend to the person having the emergency.


3) if you have an existing condition, allergy, medication, etc., how are you prepared to inform others (e.g., first responders) if you're unable to communicate for any reason?

A wallet card seems like a must. I've also searched for "ICE" or In Case of Emergency apps which tend to host this info on your smartphone (I don't use one yet - I need to study this more). One app had a voice record feature that allowed you to pre record info that can be played by first responders when they arrive.

4) what materials must you carry with you in your rig? (e.g., first aid kits, emergency signaling tools, etc.)

Standard first aid kit, aspirin, bandages. I just ordered a set of those reflective triangles should we have an emergency on the road and need to warm traffic.

6) who (generically) should you inform of your travel plans in advance of your trip and what information should you share with them?

I'm thinking one key family member or friend who can reach out to others on our behalf should be aware of our travel schedule and locations.

7) who (generically) would you want to be contacted and how would that happen if you we're unable to reach out?

Some of the ICE apps I looked at had a mass-text feature where multiple contacts would receive an emergency text when activated.

8 ) what information should you provide campground management on your arrival?

I'm thinking a list of meds (although that's a HIPPA/Privacy challenge), known allergies and a key emergency contact name and phone number are a must. I've never done that but think I will going forward.

9) if you travel with a spouse, children, friends, parents, pets; what role should they play and how should they be taken care of (e.g., be taken care of at the campsite, join you at the hospital, get back home, etc.) ? Is there something they need to know in advance?

Here I'm thinking about the Travel Assist plan I bought (mine's from Good Sam but I have no idea if they're great or not). This includes everything up to airlift to a hospital if needed, driving the rig to my home, caring for my dog, etc. As for info needed in advance, clarity on extraordinary measures or DNR instructions seem key as well.

10) is someone in your party trained in CPR?

I took EMT training in high school and believe I have the "muscle memory" to perform CPR. There are some apps for that too.

11) what apps are most helpful in medical emergencies and why?

I downloaded the US Army Survival Guide and it has some great tips for medical emergencies and several other emergency situations. Much more to learn here.

12) what services/service providers are most helpful and why?

See above re: Travel Assist insurance.
__________________
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 08:16 PM   #5
Rivet Master
 
andreasduess's Avatar
 
1984 34' International
Toronto , Ontario
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,496
Images: 5
Blog Entries: 1
Your ICE number should be displayed on the lock screen of your phone - for Android, you can do that in the settings. On mine, I've got both a recovery number if I lose the phone and somebody wants to return it for a reward and an ICE number.

Emergency personnel will recognize ICE and act accordingly.
__________________
andreasduess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 08:19 PM   #6
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveSueMac View Post
3) if you have an existing condition, allergy, medication, etc., how are you prepared to inform others (e.g., first responders) if you're unable to communicate for any reason?
Medic Alert Bracelet listing your most critical conditions.
Business card for your primary care physician in your wallet right behind your driver's license.
Quote:
4) what materials must you carry with you in your rig? (e.g., first aid kits, emergency signaling tools, etc.)
Marine trauma first-aid kit. A marine trauma kit starts from the assumption that outside medical aid ain't just an ambulance call away, and assumes further that you're going to hurt yourself beyond the ability of band-aids and aspirin to fix. West Marine stocks good ones in several sizes. But the off-the-shelf kits are a starting point only; no matter what kit you get, you'll have to customize it to suit your preexisting conditions. An emergency oxygen bottle may come in handy for anyone who sometimes has difficulty breathing, for example. Google "emergency o2 bottle" to find a source. They aren't cheap, though; a 90-minute supply will run you over $300 for the kit, though refills are cheaper.
Quote:
6) who (generically) should you inform of your travel plans in advance of your trip and what information should you share with them?
If you've got a medical condition that could incapacitate you on the road, definitely your primary care physician. Discuss your trip with him before you head out so that (a) he can recommend any precautions specific to your condition; and (b) he knows that if he gets a call from a doctor on the far edge of nowhere, it's likely to be important.
Also someone who has been granted limited power of attorney to act on your behalf. Note "Limited" power of attorney; discuss the matter with a real attorney to see what kind of limits to place on the power of attorney.
Quote:
8 ) what information should you provide campground management on your arrival?
How much you disclose to non-medical-professional strangers about your conditions is a personal matter. Some people try to hide their condition for the sake of personal pride or simple shyness; others have no secrets and will tell anyone.
Quote:
10) is someone in your party trained in CPR?
CPR is a mixed blessing. You don't start chest compressions if their heart is still beating, and if it's not still beating, once you start, you can't stop until there's someone else to take over. Unless you've got the stamina to perform CPR for half an hour or more without stopping, you might be better off springing for an AED instead; talk to your physician about that.
Quote:
11) what apps are most helpful in medical emergencies and why?
I have MedSense loaded on my Android tablet. It lets me check drug interactions, so that I know if I'm taking medication X, I can't have medication Y because they interfere with each other, or I can't take medication Z because it has a synergistic effect and makes medication X act like a higher dosage than it really is.
If your medical insurance provider has an app, load it for sure; in an emergency, any care is better than no care, but if you can get care that's covered by your HMO or PPO, that emergency care will cost you a whole lot less.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 08:31 PM   #7
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Protagonist View Post
It lets me check drug interactions, so that I know if I'm taking medication X, I can't have medication Y because they interfere with each other, or I can't take medication Z because it has a synergistic effect and makes medication X act like a higher dosage than it really is.
Which reminds me, carry copies of all of your prescriptions in your wallet. Or at least a list of them; including the name of the physician who prescribed it. And make sure you include any non-prescription vitamins or supplements you take as well; MedSense has taught me that sometimes medication can have adverse reactions to certain vitamin or mineral supplements. One antibiotic I had to take after surgery reacted badly with magnesium, so I had to switch from Centrum to another multivitamin for the duration because it contained magnesium.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 08:40 PM   #8
3 Rivet Member
 
2016 27' Flying Cloud
Streator , Illinois
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 129
As a result of Maggie's tragic loss, I said to my partner today, "You know. You really need to let me drive sometime. I also need to watch you hitch up and do everything else you do to get going." He is adamant about driving every mile of every trip. (He really doesn't trust my driving.) I'm not sure he really believes me but I think every couple should have this conversation in case of an event like Maggie's.
__________________
jbroedlow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 08:55 PM   #9
Rivet Master
 
InsideOut's Avatar

 
1956 22' Safari
Vintage Kin Owner
Conifer/Evergreen , Colorado
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 11,793
Images: 108
One thing Airstream related…I was glad to hear that Maggie has experience driving their Interstate. But on the other hand, my heart went out to her having this be the first time dumping the tanks & winterizing. Fortunately, an Interstate is much like a car - no hitching up.

Women: You need to know how to do these things.
Men: You need to show your partners how to do these things.

It is so important for each traveling companion to know what the other one does. Even if you still have "yours" & "mine" tasks - take the time to walk each other through what you do. You never know when you are going to need to step in due to sickness, injury or a catastrophic event like Maggie's.

Several years ago, my parents were traveling in their tent trailer (I know, sad huh!?) and my dad had a heart attack while towing - he didn't think it was major, he was "too proud" to admit he shouldn't be driving and too concerned that my mother didn't know how to tow. My mother had never pulled their trailer before. He drove himself to the hospital emergency room (I know, stupid!) and my mother was stranded not knowing how to unhitch the camper or pull it or back it, etc.. Yes, there were kind people who helped - but she felt totally helpless and stressed having to learn these things while dealing with my dad's situation. My dad was fortunate to survive, but not without quadruple by-pass surgery and a very long recovery. They ended up having a friend from home fly out to pull their trailer home - but she now knows what to do. If they had been at a campground or remote camping, there may not have been folks around to help.

I strongly encourage folks to practice the tasks of hitching, unhitching, towing & backing - you never know when you are going to need to do something that isn't "your job".

Every year we (DenCO Unit) have a women only seminar called "You CAN Tow It!" at our May Maintenance Rally. Women with many miles under their belts traveling solo and know some tips & tricks, demonstrate how to hitch & back in a casual, low pressure environment that is less intimidating than learning from your spouse. At the end of the seminar, we encourage the women to hitch up and tow away from the rally (with their partner's supervision). It's fabulous to see these women feel so empowered! For many it's the very first time they have sat on the left while towing.

Not to ramble on, but I would encourage others to arrange for similar seminars to share their experiences hitching, towing & backing at Unit or other rallies at least once a year. It's not scary if you know how...

Shari
__________________
Vintage Airstream Club - Past President 2007/2008
WBCCI #1824 - DenCO Unit Past President (2005)
AIR #30 - Join Date: 2-25-2002

RMVAC | WBCCI DenCO Unit | Sisters on the Fly | Tin Can Tourists
BIRDY - our 1956 Safari | 1964 Serro Scotty
InsideOut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 09:27 PM   #10
Moderator
 
jcanavera's Avatar

 
2004 30' Classic Slideout
Fenton , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 9,002
Images: 143
Send a message via AIM to jcanavera Send a message via Skype™ to jcanavera
Both Patty and I subscribe to Medic-Alert ($50 annually) which gives us id's that we wear, wallet cards and an 800 number that Medic-Alert answers 24x7. Our records with them contain prescriptions, contacts of family, contacts for doctors, and any special information regarding your condition.

About 2 years ago I subscribed to Good Sam Travel Aid ($100 annually). The guarantees Patty or I helicopter evac if the medical facility we are brought to cannot provide the facilities or care level we need. It also will provide someone qualified to hitch up and to take the trailer and tow vehicle home, along with providing airfare home for either of us. Pets are thought of and provisions are made for their care.

I came down with a bacterial infection back in '82 while camping down in Branson. With help from my son and my wife I got the trailer hitched and drove as far as Springfield Mo. Patty drove for the first time from Springfield to our home in St. Louis. Thankfully we were pulling a 21' Hi-Lo with a van at the time so she had no issues, other than a death grip on the steering wheel all the way home. Our neighbor backed the trailer into the drive and unhitched. I never forgot that and when the Good Sam program came about I subscribed, never wanting to put her in that situation again, especially now pulling a 31' Airstream. If the unfortunate happens and either on of us would pass. The plan also provides services with a local funeral home to get the deceased home.

Jack
__________________
Jack Canavera
STL Mo.
AIR #56
'04 Classic 30' S.O.,'03 GMC Savana 2500,'14 Honda CTX 700
jcanavera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 09:28 PM   #11
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,412
Some really wonderful advice - please keep it coming.

Sue and I went to a CDL school together to learn to drive our rig. She got it faster than I did. We share driving responsibilities from time to time (though I love it so much I selfishly do most of the driving) but great point about hooking up and disconnecting - I do that myself.

Good pre-checklist item to work on.

Other specific suggestions, tools, apps, etc most welcome!
__________________
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 09:28 PM   #12
Sbb
begorragirl
 
Sbb's Avatar
 
2017 25' Flying Cloud
Denville , New Jersey
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,029
Images: 2
We should all keep updated medical packet of info in our glove boxes and taped inside a cabinet door, easy to grab in ermergency. Medical history, md numbers, persccriptions etc. typed up wont take up much space, Maggie really reacted so correctly, God love her and protect her on the journey home. I would do exactly what she is doing...drive home...
__________________
2006 Bambi CCD ("EireStream!!")
2010 Funfinder
2005 T@B
2001 Teardrop, Mountain Hardware Tent
For some perfection takes a little longer...
Sbb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 09:38 PM   #13
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,326
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sbb View Post
We should all keep updated medical packet of info in our glove boxes and taped inside a cabinet door, easy to grab in ermergency. Medical history, md numbers, persccriptions etc. typed up wont take up much space
Good advice, but I still carry my medical info in my wallet. One thing EVERY hospital will do is check your ID when admitting you, so having my medical info sandwiched between my driver's license and my medical insurance card is the best guarantee that it will be found if I'm not conscious.

Bear in mind, though, I'm a solo Streamer, so I can't necessarily rely on somebody else to grab my info out of a cabinet or glovebox. If I want it found, it has to be on me, not squirreled away in the rig.

Which brings up a point, while you guys are planning for when one of you is incapacitated, what about for when you're BOTH incapacitated? Infections don't play fair, and are as likely to hit you both as to hit one of you.
__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2014, 09:49 PM   #14
Figment of My Imagination
 
Protagonist's Avatar
 
2012 Interstate Coach
From All Over , More Than Anywhere Else
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 10,326
Something I just remembered…

If you wear a medic alert necklace instead of a bracelet, you might consider getting a small USB flash drive to hang on the necklace and saving all of your medical information to the flash drive in Adobe Acrobat PDF format, so any hospital can access the info from any computer terminal. Good way to carry copies of x-rays, EKGs, lab results from blood tests, basically a complete copy of your entire medical file. Even just a small 1GB flash drive will store your whole medical record with room to spare. If you have a living will, you can put a copy of it on the flash drive, too.
__________________

__________________
WBCCI #1105
TAC LA-4

My Google-Fu is strong today.
Protagonist is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Heading out to buy a 345, need purchase checklist! tevake Classic Motorhomes 14 11-20-2013 11:58 PM
Interstate checklist Brentsouth Sprinter and B-van Forum 18 10-17-2013 10:55 AM
Checklist for setting up a TOAD vehicle behind a motorhome WineStream General Motorhome Topics 7 12-24-2011 01:41 PM
Medical insurance Streamer Dan Insurance & Claims 12 11-10-2011 02:07 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.