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Old 01-22-2012, 12:05 PM   #15
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What will we have for lunch?

Sometimes I think it depends on what the inspectors want for lunch!
In your case they probably wanted lemon for their pan fried fish that they got off a traveler previous to you.


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Originally Posted by polarlyse View Post
Last week we crossed from New Brunswick, Canada to Calais, Maine. The border guards were very nice and it was an easy crossing but they asked to enter our AS to check. They were in there several minutes and came out with 2 lemons from our refridgerator. For some reason they are very strict about citrus fruit entering US from Canada. Go figure. These lemons had come from home and traveled into Canada with us but were not allowed back into the US. Could it be that they did not have a passport ????? Still it was an easy crossing. We've never had a delay or any problems crossing to / from Canada.
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:37 PM   #16
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BC is a place we have been to many times and it is a great place to visit, as is just about any part of Canada except one province where English is nearly prohibited (the people are nice there though).

Rant begins:

The fruit problem with US customs is crazy. We have been in Canada about 8 or 9 of the last 11 years, and in 2010 we found that the US Fruit Police had taken over Homeland Security. For some fruit (who knows from time to time which fruit?) if it doesn't have a US label or a label from certain countries (I think Chile is ok) they will steal ("confiscate") the fruit. They miss a lot because our fridge is usually so packed they can't find everything. I trust Canada to be just as careful about fruit imports as the US, and maybe more so. The fruit in Canadian stores looks better than the fruit is US stores.

With 4 border crossings, the fruit police stopped us twice in 2010 and went through the trailer. Not too many years ago, they let you watch them inside, but no longer. Who knows what they are doing with your property? The bloody paws story in post #10 shows contempt for visitors, but they treat US citizens just as badly. Court decisions and recent laws have eliminated almost all 4th amendment constitutional rights at the border and 100 miles in from it. I am not saying all liberty has been eliminated as some do, but I am saying they can do just about anything they want at the border. Fear has been used to create this situation. Since the border agents have to prove they are doing something, fruit has become a priority. It is a typical case of picking on something inconsequential because they don't know what they are doing. It is like running speed traps rather than helping people or looking for bad drivers; it is so much easier to sit in a car with a speed gun.

Canadian border agents are friendly and we have had only one stop in scores of crossings since 2000. That was inexplicable (no trailer then) and they wanted to look at our ID's (before passport time) and run it through the computers. The guy inside told us it was because we said we were going to Alaska and down-and-outers go there—he was joking, I think, because we had a brand new 4Runner and my wife looks normal (oh, maybe it was me). The agent that sent us inside seemed to be new, uncertain of herself and trying to show she was extra careful. So I think part of the problem is new hires on both sides who feel they have to be tough and push people around a bit. In the past few years there have been thousands of new hires on the US side. They don't even know how to say "hello", "how are you" or "welcome home".

When we entered the US in past years they asked us if we had bought anything and how much. Customs has always been pretty easy going, but some people go over the limits and duties have to be paid. In 2010, no one asked us about what we had bought except for fruit. I imagine a lot of stuff gets in without paying duties. Customs and immigration have been merged into one agency and the immigration agents' attitude (bad, very bad) has been adopted as the standard.

I think the result of this is that travel between the US and Canada has been affected negatively. On our last trip, as we approached a US border station, we wondered what we would be put through that time. We heard stories from other travelers that were similar. Who wants to go through this? It is sad that fear and distrust of our neighbors has led to this and the US attitude only makes it worse.

I hope Canadians keep coming here because the border agents are not typical of the rest of us and I would eat your fruit. Rant completed.

Yes, BC is nice.
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Old 01-22-2012, 06:15 PM   #17
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British Columbia Video Information

Plan your route now while you have time to research where you might want to go.
This site, among many others, might be of interest to those heading to the NW.

Travel Videos of British Columbia


and many more.
Dave
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Old 01-22-2012, 07:16 PM   #18
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Thanks for starting this thread. If all goes as planned, we'll be pulling an Airstream from Anchorage to Seattle, starting the last week of August into the second week of September. ...
Dave-We completed the Anchorage to Seattle trip. Thanks again for the link in the original post, it was a wealth of information. In fact, we used much of the information found here. Other than one small glitch (a transfer case that slipped out of gear, putting the TV into neutral, and plummeting down on long, steep downward grades. In retrospect, not that small.), it was an amazing journey. The border crossings were quick and uneventful.

Fly at Night was spot on about the hills in Fraser Canyon. Fortunately, we had the TV repaired before we got there. I now have a profound respect for Hensley hitches. Some of the sights there were unlike anything we've ever seen.
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Old 01-28-2012, 02:37 PM   #19
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Brake Check

If you have lived in the flat lands of major river drainage areas of central North America, you need to rethink your driving strategy before heading into the Rocky, Monashee, and other mountain ranges of the west.
, .
This type of sign is posted at the "MANDATORY TRUCK BRAKE CHECK" pull-outs on mountain passes.

Why would you stop there if you are pulling a travel tailer????
Well, if that brake controller wire does not have a good connection, I will guarantee that you will wish you had stopped and taken the time to ensure all systems were working as they are designed.
BC09k59 Trans-Canada Slow Highway, Golden BC 2009 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

The height of the pass has little bearing on the grade % one might encounter or the sharpness of that corner at the bottom of that grade.

On those sharp corners, many times there are no dividers to separate the traffic, so always be alert for the other tourist that has misjudged his speed and is unable to stay in his own lane.

This is all beautiful country to look at, but remember, your driving is #1. Let your partner take the pictures.

Dave
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Old 01-28-2012, 06:01 PM   #20
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Border Patrol Fruit Sniffing Cat

I posted this a while ago in another thread but could not resist doing it again.
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Old 01-28-2012, 06:09 PM   #21
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"The height of the pass has little bearing on the grade % one might encounter or the sharpness of that corner at the bottom of that grade...

... This is all beautiful country to look at, but remember, your driving is #1. Let your partner take the pictures."


Truth!
There seemed to be a challenging sharp corner at the end of most grades, which added to the excitement. At one point, while my wife was hanging out the window to take pictures, I was actually considering fabricating a safety belt for her so I didn't have to worry about her falling out on the curves.

Although we encountered more of them in the Yukon, I'm surprised you haven't mentioned those little orange flags.



Good times.
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Old 01-28-2012, 07:01 PM   #22
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I have to second the steep grades comments. Several years ago my wife and I were tent camping on Vancouver Island. We were taking a day trip from Port Alberni to Ucluelet. There was one grade that was 18% (yes, that's eighteen percent!!); 8% is steep, 18% is very steep. The hill wasn't very long, but it had turns.
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Old 01-28-2012, 07:34 PM   #23
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That nice hill (Hydro Hill HWY #4) and lots more that come with the corners is still there and waiting for others to experience the thrill of travelling to the "Pacific Rim National Park".
This is the East side of Hydro Hill.
http://g.co/maps/gupej
This is the pullout at the top of Hydro Hill at Larry Lake.
http://g.co/maps/smfjs

Cut and paste this into Google MAP and you are at the top of the Hydro Hill.

49.116597,-125.438483

Hauling fuel over there in 1969-70 with a semi, KW and 4 + 4 transmission, it was 1+1 gear at the top.
Dave

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Originally Posted by 10Smiles View Post
I have to second the steep grades comments. Several years ago my wife and I were tent camping on Vancouver Island. We were taking a day trip from Port Alberni to Ucluelet. There was one grade that was 18% (yes, that's eighteen percent!!); 8% is steep, 18% is very steep. The hill wasn't very long, but it had turns.
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Old 01-29-2012, 01:08 AM   #24
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Orange Flags, Yukon

"Where the highway is heavily marked with pot holes, the pot holes and rough sections of the highway are identified by small orange flags."
Don't believe everything you read.
On our journey into Dawson City in July 2008 we found the road to be better than we expected. Very little traffic and only a few frost boils which were consistently well marked with the orange flags.
I will have to go to my journal to pin point the exact location, but to make a long story short, ====
heading north, about 2 hours south of Dawson City the road had been pretty good and we were enjoying the scenery at about 45 MPH. Came over the crest of a hill and dropped down into an S turn to the left and hit an unmarked frost heave halfway through the corner that put the CLIPPER into hang glider mode. No traffic, so was able to recover and land with the shiny side up.
There were no markers on this so I marked the mileage down to watch for it on the way back.
Because of this incident and the experience on our return trip, I later installed a camera in the upper windshield to record such events in the future. (see ARC)
http://www.airforums.com/forums/f42/...tml#post938938

On the return trip I was watching for this same spot, and sure enough we met a pickup/SOB trailer coming at us airborne and fishtailing, the drivers mouth was open wide = like you might see with a cartoon character, and I am sure I could see bones sticking out of his knuckles on the top of that steering wheel.
If I can remember to look in my journal I will try to post a Goggle Maps image of that stretch of road at some future date.

Moral of this story, always expect the unexpected.
Dave


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.

Although we encountered more of them in the Yukon, I'm surprised you haven't mentioned those little orange flags.

Good times.
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Old 01-29-2012, 08:18 AM   #25
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"Moral of this story, always expect the unexpected."

That's the best possible advice when in driving in YT and BC. I gather most of the road repairs were complete by late August/early September, but we still encountered a number of orange flags, and even a couple areas of road construction. Although the road conditions were generally good, we quickly learned to take the flags seriously. Some ranged from a minor blip, but some were memorable.

Good idea to mount a camera in the windshield, and a very clever arrangement. As I mounted, and used, mobile cameras for years in our patrol vehicles, it gave me some ideas for future trips. I found this little gadget a few days ago. It's sold for about $300 by a company named Gadspot, located in California. I've bought several security cams from them over the past year, and am impressed with the quality, so this may be a good investment. It may even save some wear and tear on my co-pilot.

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Old 01-29-2012, 02:53 PM   #26
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Traveling across Vancouver Is. sometime in the middle of the last decade, we had to wait while a box truck and trailer were cleared off the side of the highway. The driver came around a curve too fast, tipped over and almost made it into a pond. My recollection is fuzzy at this point, but it looked like the trailer started it and I believe he was at the bottom of a hill. It took about an hour for the wreckers to get the vehicles upright and a bunch of us stood around willing to give advice, but no one asked. I don't remember an 18% grade, but it was a challenging highway though we were not towing anything. It was a very pretty drive and Vancouver Is. is worth a visit except for the very high ferry fares (I mention that every chance I get hoping the BC gov't will do something about it).

Flags and frost heaves are part of life in northern climes. Sometimes the heave gets you. Sometimes the heave is enormous, a sudden hill in the pavement—10 feet of pavement may be a foot or two higher than the originally graded highway and not even across it so you twist as well as bounce. The worst section for the this type of heave in 2010 was between Destruction Bay, Yukon, and the Alaska border as I recall. Flags are usually there, not always. I have hardly ever seen any flags for broken pavement in the lower 48 though; it is a good idea, but you can't rely on flags being there and drive with your eyes closed.

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Old 01-29-2012, 04:07 PM   #27
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I have to second the steep grades comments. Several years ago my wife and I were tent camping on Vancouver Island. We were taking a day trip from Port Alberni to Ucluelet. There was one grade that was 18% (yes, that's eighteen percent!!); 8% is steep, 18% is very steep. The hill wasn't very long, but it had turns.
This road is a blast on a motorcycle!
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Old 02-10-2012, 01:30 PM   #28
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Stewart Crossing

I finally got around to checking my journal and determined the area of that big frost heave on our 2008 Yukon discovery trip.
The location was in the north lane, 32 miles north of Pelly Crossing, just over the crest of the grade. ( approx.15 miles south of "STEWART CROSSING" ) I believe this is the Goggle shot that does not come even close to the experience/excitement of the ride.
63.230342,-136.528215 - Google Maps

Beautiful country, but take your tools with you.
Dave

Quote:
Originally Posted by masseyfarm View Post
"Where the highway is heavily marked with pot holes, the pot holes and rough sections of the highway are identified by small orange flags."
Don't believe everything you read.
On our journey into Dawson City in July 2008 we found the road to be better than we expected. Very little traffic and only a few frost boils which were consistently well marked with the orange flags.
I will have to go to my journal to pin point the exact location, but to make a long story short, ====
heading north, about 5 hours south of Dawson City the road had been pretty good and we were enjoying the scenery at about 45 MPH. Came over the crest of a hill and dropped down into an S turn to the left and hit an unmarked frost heave halfway through the corner that put the CLIPPER into hang glider mode. No traffic, so was able to recover and land with the shiny side up.
There were no markers on this so I marked the mileage down to watch for it on the way back.
Because of this incident and the experience on our return trip, I later installed a camera in the upper windshield to record such events in the future. (see ARC)
http://www.airforums.com/forums/f42/...tml#post938938

On the return trip I was watching for this same spot, and sure enough we met a pickup/SOB trailer coming at us airborne and fishtailing, the drivers mouth was open wide = like you might see with a cartoon character, and I am sure I could see bones sticking out of his knuckles on the top of that steering wheel.
If I can remember to look in my journal I will try to post a Goggle Maps image of that stretch of road at some future date.

Moral of this story, always expect the unexpected.
Dave
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