Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-30-2008, 11:49 AM   #15
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Sounds like a great trip. Santa Fe area can be a lot of fun. For me the best parts were the country outside of town. The Pecos canyon, the Jemez river area and so forth. Great history, great food, great outdoors oportunity. I cant wait to get over into NM. Keep us posted on your travels.
__________________

__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 02:26 PM   #16
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Taos

Saturday we went to the Palace of the Governors. It was first built in 1610 and has had many remodels and changes over the past 398 years. It was turned into a museum almost 100 years ago. They show the various old construction with adobe bricks (40 lbs. each) and the very small doorways of the 17th century—the people were shorter than us plus the smaller the doorway, the less heat loss. Lots of pictures of how it looked in the 19th century, the old interiors and such. The front faces the plaza and is where the Indians sell silver jewelry. In 20 years of visiting Santa Fe we had never gone to this museum and it was well worth it. Even in the 1800's Santa Fe seemed to be a very small town until the railroad came in the later part of the century. Despite the railroad being named after the city, it was never on the mainline, but on a spur. Since 1610, it's been the capital of first the Provincias Internas of the Reina (Kingdom) of Nueva España, then of a territory of México, then of the US, then the state of New Mexico. I'll refrain from writing about the history of the Spanish colonies, my major in grad school.

Left Santa Fe this morning. We thought of staying another night, but I was really tired of wrestling with the too high sewer and the poor wireless service. Beautiful place though.

Uneventful trip to Taos and we are staying at Taos Valley campground between Ranchos de Taos and Taos. Nice views of the mountains and the sewer works much better and the wireless works great. Still are few RV's here and on the road, so the site feels open.

I suppose we'll go into town this afternoon after lunch and showers. Kind of windy and 50 mile gusts predicted tomorrow. It's snowing in Colorado tonight and tomorrow, but looks warm enough to melt off on the roads by the time we return on Tuesday.

And, Rodney, I recall there's a hot spring in the Jémez Mountains that's a fair hike off a highway in the NF and used to be well known to hot springs freaks as a good place to go. That's one we never made it to, but I'm sure it's in the hot springs books.

Gene
__________________

__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2008, 05:48 PM   #17
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Walked around the Taos plaza today. Barb and her cousins used to be dropped here when their parents visited other relatives in the late '50's and early '60's. The rocking horse in front of what used to be a 5 & 10 is at least the 4th one there since Barb rode it (I asked the store owner). The movie theater is gone too as well as the cafe next to the La Fonda hotel (different than the hotel in Santa Fe). The girls used to hang out there, order something and nurse it like a beer in an expensive bar. In those days Pueblo Indian men would hang out around the plaza, but no longer.

There are a lot of shoppes and galleries in Taos, but part of the plaza is dominated by tourist curio shops. Quiet today and meters on the plaza were free.

Very windy today and we're mostly hanging out in the Safari. We've been working too hard at home and mostly we needed to be lazy on this trip.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2008, 10:48 AM   #18
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Home

Monday another lazy day. We finally got outside of the Safari at 1 and went to the Taos plaza again, walked around and spent too much time in the two kitchen stores. Barb's a great cook and apparently needs some of the kitchen tools, but if she buys many more, I'll have to build another outbuilding to store them all.

I have to admit I went nuts last year in a kitchen store in Steamboat Springs and bought several beautiful cast iron things—skillets, etc.—with a red outside. Not Croisset, a different company from Germany or France with nicer color. We're trying to avoid aluminum and teflon cookware—bad chemicals. That creates a problem for traveling because aluminum is light for skillets, but food sticks no matter how much oil you use in the pan. Still trying to figure that one out.

Being lazy has some other benefits than the obvious. I finally finished Stephen Donaldson's "Fatal Revenant", the 8th book of the Thomas Covenant Chronicles. I read the first six 25 years ago and when we were stuck in Peterburg, Alaska, in 2006 (ferry caught fire, had to wait for another one), I saw #7 in a bookstore there. I didn't know he had started writing more of the series. #8 came out last year. These are the most frustrating quest books I've ever read, but I keep reading them. Nine is supposed to be the last one and I guess it will be out around 2010. Eight was too long and did get tedious at times. Donaldson lives in NM and I thought of finding him and telling him to end it quick, but I decided to start another book, Paul Krugman's "Conscience of a Liberal." First chapter was very good.

Yesterday morning we used the Flush King for the first time. The water pressure at the campground was low, but after a long while the black water tank filled up. The wonderful thing about the Flush King is the plastic is transparent and we can see if the tank flushes clean—it took 3 flushes to do it.

I worried about snow in Colorado since it snowed 3 1/2 inches back in Crawford, but the trip home saw only dry roads. Everything had melted and our monster pile of snow and ice by the front steps has dwindled to an inch or two. There's still some snow in the forest, but the grass is getting greener. Maybe some snow tomorrow, but spring is sort of here, al least by local standards. What we notice over and over again is that Colorado has very few places along the road to pull over—no picnic tables either. We stopped in Saguache and found in town a large parking lot next to what looked like a community building so we could make lunch. Saguache has seen better days—the old downtown is almost all vacant and rundown.

Next trip—two nights at Ridgway State Park at the end of the month while I attend a two day board of directors meeting.

I think we towed about 750 miles, made a side trip, got about 12 mpg towing and I don't want to know how much we spent on gas. Cheapest was at the City Market in Alamosa. $3.45 or so for unleaded at many small towns including Taos. Back home a list of things to do a mile long.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2008, 06:35 PM   #19
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
What a neat trip! Don't think for a minute that I wasn't living every moment of it with you as I read your account. I should be in NM only a month and a half from now. Hopefully there will be some snow melt before then.....

Thanks for sharing the blow by blow!
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2008, 06:54 PM   #20
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Wash and Wax

Today came that point between adventures. Washing took a couple of hours moving the ladder around and around to clean the top and then drying. It felt like there were 1,000 square feet of aluminum. After lunch and ibuprofen, wax, many more hours and 1,000 square miles of aluminum, almost all waxed. Just the propane cover and one stone guard to go. More ibuprofen next. More wax tomorrow along with cleaning the windows.

Waxing, other than the endlessness of it, allows me to see all the "issues". The scratch on one side that I must have gotten in Santa Fe as I tried not to hit any piñon branches in the dark at the Rancheros campground, dings in the stone guards, drips of sealant in various places, road tar all the way up on the roof, sloppy application of sealant around courtesy lights, windows and such, and some "stuff" on the chrome band at the bottom of the aluminum panels. The "stuff" feels like sealant or a coating that is coming off the chrome. Perhaps it's not chrome. Could this be the filiform I have been reading about? Doesn't seem to fit the discription. It's found where the chrome pieces end.

The other part about waxing was that it looks just the same as it did after we washed it. I hope making sure that all the seams are well waxed made it worth it because it's not all that shiny—not like waxing a car.

Next adventure—next weekend at Ridgway State Park. I have a 2 day board of directors meeting in Ridgway (about 85 miles from home), so we're taking the trailer and lots of gin. And yes, Ridgway is spelled without an "e". If you check the online reservations system for Colorado state parks, it will tell you every space is booked up. Call the park. The system is a bad one. I understand you can't trust the California state park online system either.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2008, 07:05 PM   #21
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrawfordGene
Waxing, other than the endlessness of it, allows me to see all the "issues". The scratch on one side that I must have gotten in Santa Fe as I tried not to hit any piñon branches in the dark at the Rancheros campground, dings in the stone guards, drips of sealant in various places, road tar all the way up on the roof, sloppy application of sealant around courtesy lights, windows and such, and some "stuff" on the chrome band at the bottom of the aluminum panels.
mere beauty marks

Quote:
Next adventure—next weekend at Ridgway State Park.
And we will be expecting a full accounting including photos
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2008, 10:11 PM   #22
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Ridgway

Just back from Ridgway where I attended a grueling 2 day board of directors meeting for a nonprofit where I am now the acting president. We stayed at Ridgway State Park, a very nice one with hundreds of campsites, quite a few with full hookups. Quiet at this time of year and not a lot of people there for the weekend. $22 for the site and $6 for the park entrance fee. They were nice enough to let us stay over several hours past check out. Reservations start May 1 and it may get crowded quickly. The reservoir is still low as they are letting the water run through the dam figuring there will be a lot more runoff soon. Many boaters come to this park.

Ridgway is a small mountain town 27 miles south of Montrose on US 550. The park is 9 miles north of Ridgway. Kate's place on Clinton, 1 block north of the highway to Telluride (Colo. 62 or 64 or something like that) is good for breakfast and lunch. There's a pretty good Chinese and Thai restaurant on that highway—I think it's called the Oriental. It's about 8 miles south to Ouray, more expensive for everything, a Victorian era mining town with quite a few old houses and touristy. Ridgway is more like a real place.

Ouray is in a box canyon with spectacular mountains close in to the town, but long before you get to Ridgway you see the San Juan Mtns, still with a lot of snow. A lot of jagged peaks and every view of them is wonderful.

Gas was around $3.50 in Montrose, higher as you go south.

A cold weekend with this morning's temp around 20˚ and high in the low 50's. We've had temps about 10 degrees higher lately. This will help slow the runoff and ease the possibility of floods.

Everything is working fine though there are a number of warranty issues to be taken care of later. We are thinking of taking the trailer to Denver in July for that and a friend's wedding. Before that the Shrine Pass rally and I'm unsure there's any time for anything else before June. We go to NYC in less than 3 weeks driving our 4Runner and will have to sleep in uncomfortable beds, eat bad food on the road, carry a lot of our own food and drive like banshees to get to the East Coast and back in a 3 week timeframe with a week in NYC, 1 or 2 in RI and the same out on LI. We're thinking of visiting Jackson Center on the way back and see if we can spot why QC is so bad for so many people.

Sorry, Rodney, we didn't take any photos and have a bunch in the camera we've never gotten to download. Then I have to figure out how to get them into thumbnails, something I haven't mastered yet.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2008, 09:34 AM   #23
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Sounds like a great trip! I envy you for living in such a neat area. Look on the upside about the NY trip. All the bad food and uncomfortable beds will just make you appreciate the AS more.
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-14-2008, 08:31 PM   #24
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
More adventure

On the first day of summer, we went to our first rally. Since I had an afternoon of meetings, we couldn't leave until after 5 pm for an about 200 mile trip to Leadville, Colo. We left from Delta, Colo. with a full tank of gas and drove hard and fast. I wanted to get to the campsite before dark and figured we had a chance to make it. First comes Cerro Summit and another pass east of Montrose, and then to Monarch Pass, 11,312'. It's a long way up and down and it takes many gallons of gas when you're passing cars going uphill.

The Safari follows like a parasite even when speeding downhill and around sharp curves. I guess I wasn't going too fast because Barb wasn't screaming (when we were in NYC several weeks before—no Airstream there—I heard her gasp a few times, but I didn't think Manhattan traffic was that bad). We got to Leadville around 9 and called Charlie (Pacerized) to help us find the site and he graciously came to lead us. We did miss a turn, but got back to the meeting place as Charlie got there and led us to the campsites. We parked amongst the lodgepole and ponderosa and were so wired we stayed up to midnight.

On Saturday we slept really late and then went out and started meeting people. Rodney was there with his work in progress Tradewind—he greeted us when we arrived. Charlie's very special and rare Airstream was very nice. I think there were six of us ranging from a Bambi to a 31'. Everyone was friendly and no matter what we disagree on about politics or religion, we share Airstreams and the love of travel.

We had a feast Saturday night gathering near the campfire. There are always a few people who want to put all the wood on the fire and you just never know who the potential arsonist is.

We and Rodney stayed an extra night and I enjoyed talking about university life and a few s core other topics. We tried out the 1,000 watt generator. Since we were camped in a tall forest, the solar panels didn't get too much direct sun and it was good to have the backup. I tried running the microwave and toaster (separately) with the generator plugged into the trailer. It didn't work very well. The combination of altitude (about 10,000') lowering the efficiency of the generator and some likely voltage drop in that long cord meant neither worked well. I have to experiment with plugging the appliances directly into the generator and seeing how they work. That may tell me something about getting a short cable from the trailer to the generator. There seems to be no clear way to adjust the fuel/air mixture, but I'll probably look into taking some panels off the generator one of these days to see where to adjust it (like 10 minutes before I want to use it).

The monitor panel, which had worked perfectly, stopped working well at all. One of the others there with an Airstream manufactured in the same month as ours has had the same problem. After the dealer replaced all sorts of things without success, he found out it was dirty connections on a buss block. When I took it to the dealer, they said the panel had to be replaced and it wasn't the buss block—we'll see.

We did find we could boondock easily for three nights and each take one shower and still have fresh water. We brought an added 5 gallons to be safe. Unfortunately, we have no idea how much water was left in the tank since the monitor went crazy.

This rally was very informal and we liked it that way. I understand there are really big ones with much formality and I think we will avoid those. I'll have to check out Forum rallies, though I am unsure just when we will have time to go on any rallies for a while.

We used a lot of gas getting there—3 passes plus getting up to Leadville. I think we averaged about 9.5 mpg instead of our usual 11.5. Driving like a maniac in the high country uses much gas. We did much better going home since we had only one pass, though I can't remember how well we did on gas.

Our next trip was to Denver to get warranty work done. I posted that story on the 2008 Safari Quality thread. When we got the Safari back, we ended up in a really crummy RV park in Golden. When Barb made reservations, they were the only ones that answered the phone. Most of the very narrow sites were filled with permanent residents. The pad was about one foot wider than the trailer and it was quite difficult to get into the site given the narrow access road. Fortunately we weren't there much because a good friend was getting married in Boulder and we went to the pre-wedding dinner and the wedding and were mostly gone. The Safari is pretty well insulated against sound, so even in a place so crowded we heard little noise. We also got to see some friends including one who got me hammered on gin & tonic (officially it had tonic, but it seemed to be gin, gin and more gin and a lime slice).

Denver was extraordinarily hot—96˚ on Thursday and 99˚ on Friday. When we went through Denver's Platte Valley on Thursday, our Tundra told us it was 106˚ there. I've never seen Denver so hot, though it was 10˚ cooler officially. When we got to the RV park we turned on the AC. It was 100˚ inside and after 2 hours it had "cooled" to 89˚. We kept the blinds, curtains and skylight closed. I was not impressed with the AC. A 13,500 BTU AC should do a better job. The refrigerator stayed at 60˚ for at least 2 hours, although the freezer was down to 16˚. Then we went to the dinner. When we returned at about 10 pm, the AC was down to 70˚ and the refrigerator to 39˚. On Saturday, we set the AC at 70˚ at 7:30 am—not our electricity—and it was close (73˚) when we returned around 2. It was only 82˚ on Saturday in Denver and not in the upper 90's. I'm curious whether the AC can handle hot weather. The refrigerator just takes time and was ok after that.

When we went to Denver midweek, there was a lot of truck traffic on I-70. I am now used to passing and getting used to judging the length of the trailer so I don't cut too close in front of people. Some truckers signal it's ok with their headlights, most don't. If they do, I signal "thank you" with my courtesy lights. Lots of passing on that highway and not an enjoyable drive.

Next trip is only about 100 miles to Basalt, Colo. since I have a Board of Directors meeting in Glenwood Springs. It's the closest good campground available since the ones around Glenwood are all filled with oil and gas and construction workers except for one in Glenwood Canyon with very difficult, narrow pads to back into. We'll have to go back to Denver to have some parts the dealer ordered installed and will try to combine that with a state park if we go in August, or start a trip to the west coast going east first.

I still haven't bothered to post any photos because I'm too lazy to figure it out. Several Forum members have sent me instructions, but I just haven't done anything yet. Some day…

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2008, 10:00 PM   #25
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Continued improvements. I installed one of those large, wide levels just under the front window. I used locktite to seal the screw holes. The first time I've drilled into the aluminum; it felt like a violation. Put up a hook next to the bathroom door so we have a place to hang a towel and grab it when we get out of the shower. The suction cup hooks stay up for a while, but eventually fall down.

My infrared temperature goodie arrived. Sure I tell myself, I can watch my tire temps. Of course, I can get similar information from the tire pressure monitor. But it's a cool toy and I've measured the temperature of my palm, my armpit, my wife's left ear, the stove pilot light, the AC, the TV screen, various walls, floors and ceilings in our house. All useful information. Best deal was on Amazon, about $42.

With the price of crude oil down this past week, I'm hopeful we can make the long anticipated NW trip this September, our longest so far in our Safari. I haven't heard anything about fires in Cal lately, but maybe the media got tired of that news. I'm even thinking about Alaska next year. I have to convince Barb that's it's ok to take the Safari to the North Slope on the Dalton Hwy. We were there in '02 (pre-Airstream) and you do have to worry about gravel hits, but it wasn't all that bad on the truck and the rock guards and the truck ought to protect the Safari. The North Slope is an awesome place.

Of course, if Iran is attacked, forget all of it—fuel will skyrocket in price and gas lines will be longer than ever. We will have an extended recession, maybe worse.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2008, 12:55 PM   #26
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Our longest Safari adventure

Getting ready for our longest trip—3 weeks. We're going to travel west through Utah and Nevada, much of it on the Loneliest Road, US 50. Then make our way to Marin County and start north up the coast. Somewhere in Oregon, maybe as far as Astoria, we'll turn inland and make our way back home. Usually I plan everything so I have a pretty good idea where we are each day, though I leave some room for spontaneity. This time I'm leaving a lot to whatever we decide to do since I have no good idea what it's like to travel this far with a trailer. I guess it might be good for me not to plan so much, sort of like therapy, but I'll be thinking ahead anyway.

I been busy going over the truck—washing, waxing, vacuuming, cleaning windows and applying Rainex to the windshield and front side windows, going over all the fluids and checking mechanical stuff. I did my third oil and filter change and as with the others, I've never had a vehicle that was so difficult to do and took so long. I sent an ugly e-mail to Toyota this morning to make myself feel better.

Today I hope to wash the Safari and at the least polish the plastic rock guards over the windows and the stainless steel rock guards. I have some Griot's Paint Sealant, and I'm eager to try it, but may not have much time before we leave Tuesday, especially if I keep writing.

I've checked out the internet for locations of Camping Worlds if we need RV supplies, Airstream dealers for emergencies, and Trader Joe's because they have good food.

Yesterday I installed an LED lamp in the ceiling. Our Safari has 11 halogen lamps in the ceiling and I think the light is too bright at times, somewhat harsh, and uses a lot of battery power. When boondocking, we use them as little as possible, but the rotating reading ("task") lights over the dinette aren't really that good. I've thought about putting a 12v rheostat in the line, but haven't spent a lot of time looking for one (electrical engineers: does a rheostat means less electrical consumption since some goes to making the rheostat hot?). I would probably mount it near the switch under the sink cabinet. It looks pretty difficult to get into the switch box, but with some ingenuity and a lot of cursing, I'm sure it can be done, someday.

The center halogen lamp of three right in front of rear hanging cabinet seemed like the best one to experiment with. Airstream is checking out LED's and since I asked some questions, they sent me one to get our impressions. Since I didn't have the right connectors, I had to solder the new ones to the trailer wiring, use residential wire nuts and then tape around that. The lamp does not have the metal rings around it since it's a prototype. It is a plastic opaque circle. The light is bluish instead of the yellowish color rendition of halogen or incandescent lamps. It's more diffuse and I guess 11 of them would be less harsh, though I don't know about brightness. We were wondering if 11 of them would make us look like corpses if the color rendition can't be improved. They take 1/10 the amps of the halogen lamps. LED's are the future of lighting, not compact flourescent. They use less power and last far, far longer, but color is the problem (CF bulbs can be weird too and dimable ones apparently make things grey). The springs that hold these style lamps can make it hard to remove and install them and from personal experience I can report that when one whacks you on a finger, it really hurts. I can also report it's really easy to get small scratches in the ceiling, but so far, Barb hasn't noticed. Don't tell her. If the color rendition isn't improved I would consider maybe changing half of the ceiling lamps to mellow out things and save amps. I think they should match the OEM lamps though. I suggested to Airstream a rheostat would be useful as original equipment because depending on what you're doing, different lighting intensity is useful. I wouldn't change the bedroom lighting, I think, because we don't use the ceiling lights very often and when we do, we want them bright.

Time to do something instead of writing about it, though this is more fun.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2008, 01:11 PM   #27
Full Timers/Diesel power.
 
Mike Leary's Avatar
 
1983 31' Airstream310
Cactus Hug , Arizona
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,540
Images: 11
Be very carefull driving around Salt Lake City, we go through very early in the morning. You can get
some cool t-shirts along 50.....it is indeed, lonely, but a great cruise.
__________________
"A settled wisdom, plus the itch to be elsewhere"
Mike Leary is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2008, 01:17 PM   #28
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Sounds like the makings of a great trip Gene! I bet you have a blast. I suspect that you will find that simply having a general route without regimenting yourselves further is a nice way to go. That is the general approach I took for this past summers trip ( been back less than a month and can't wait to get back out there ) and it worked very well. The 9 months of preparation, finding out what was out there to see, getting local knowledge (which you certainly provided plenty of) and so forth was worth the effort, but going day to day was wonderful. Want to spend another day or two where you are? fine; tired of where you are? hook up and roll on down the road. In any case, I hope you will be posting from the road so we can all live vicariously through your adventures while we sit at home (15 weeks until my next trip but who's counting ).
__________________

__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rust starts quickly brijbldr Repairing/Replacing Floor &/or Frame 18 08-26-2010 06:51 PM
Downtime Notice (Wednesday Night) Andy R Forum Admin, News and Member Account Info 13 08-03-2007 06:45 PM
furnace starts and stops BINDER Furnaces, Heaters, Fireplaces & Air Conditioning 27 02-07-2007 11:44 AM
The International Starts and the temp is??? jcanavera WBCCI Rallies & Events 9 07-05-2006 10:28 PM
Walk through Wednesday, any suggestions for new owners? CaliforniaStreamin Buyer Guidelines 6 08-24-2004 02:46 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.