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Old 05-16-2012, 08:40 PM   #29
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The less time on the road, the better. And since we rarely travel anything but back roads, we're generally pretty slow. Ergo, not very many miles in any one day. (And even more rarely, two days of travel in a row.)


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Old 05-16-2012, 09:04 PM   #30
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Very seldom do we make reservations for the next night cg. That only puts the pressure on and then you can't stop at that interesting little town/tourist point, etc. when you pass. Being self-contained, we can stop anywhere we get tired.

We like to see the country and seldom drive after dark, but if we are heading east and pushed for time to be someplace, those clear summer evenings and fresh cool air are good for traveling.( if on good wide roads where wildlife is not to plentiful.)

When traveling West, we try to stop early and get a early start in the morning with the sun behind you. You sure get some good pictures early in the day with the sun on your back.

We also seldom travel with "buddies" as you just end up stressed out watching/worrying what they are doing.

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Old 05-16-2012, 09:42 PM   #31
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Some rules are fairly simple. Rules meant as guidelines to avoid problems. 300-miles or 3 o'clock is a good one, as noted. The others are to avoid driving before sunrise and to be off the road well before dusk starts (not sunset, but earlier). In fact, one should (as one trip-plans) leave an hour to an hour plus one-half "built-in" at days end to be off the road . . some leeway to problems unforeseen.

All this assumes a fair distance over a week or so. Easy to overdo it the first days, but the toll appears by Day Two or Three.

As CrawfordGene notes above -- the average speed -- takes into account stops for fuel, food and a bit of stretchin' & walkin' around. Thus 45-mph means the entire day of travel, not the travel speed.

And, only in late spring through earliest fall do we have the long hours of daylight. Fall & winter should, rightfully, cut hours down some.

Sunrise, sunset, dawn and dusk times around the World - Gaisma is a handy pilots tool for determining the hours of travel available on any calendar day.

And, as noted above (and elsewhere), if one drew a line on a map of the US from about D.C. to Cleveland, anything east of that line is slow travel. West, it improves to the Big Muddy, and is consistently good all the way to the coastal range of the West Coast.

For me a day of travel is about the food. An interesting road food joint, or a good looking rest area to have the dinner that's been cooking since breakfast in the TT (slow cooker in sink, etc). With two people there are nice ways to divide up responsibilities, not just driving.

The cost of fuel seems expensive until one finds a rhythm to moving across the country. Plenty of other ways to cut daily expenses in a "slow travel" mode.

.
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Old 05-16-2012, 09:45 PM   #32
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Funny you should ask, we're both 65 1/2.

Today was about 4 hours give or take, I try and stay off of Interstates so sometimes the time between stops is longer than it could be. All things being equal getting parked in early afternoon and leaving the next morning around 10:00 works for us.
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Old 05-17-2012, 09:14 AM   #33
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The others are to avoid driving before sunrise and to be off the road well before dusk starts (not sunset, but earlier).

Easy to overdo it the first days, but the toll appears by Day Two or Three.
Dusk is a concern because parking the trailer in the dark can be a problem, especially if it is a back-in. I got a scratch in a CG our first year because I couldn't see the trees, and that was going forward in a very narrow space.

Our distances do tend to drop after the first couple of days. On really long trips we now take 2 days somewhere every week to sleep late(r) and recuperate. We sure like seeing everything which leads to long, long trips and lots of miles. That also means a lot of gas—fuel is more than half our expenses on those trips.

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Old 05-17-2012, 09:53 AM   #34
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I am 74, My wife of 43 years is 64. We haven't traveled too far from home since our retirement 6 years ago because we like to 'stay' at favorite places a week or so. However, we are thinking of taking long trips soon. We have ventured on more than 5 hours drive and THAT appears to be my hourly limit if we know where we are going to 'land'. Night driving is difficult and the stroke that my wife suffered 6 years ago prevents her from any driving. Other than that and arthritis issues we have no major health issues. We did travel ( road trips) much during the early years of our marriage and when the kids were growing up we did major 'tours' with/for them. The only turn off for us is major highway travel. I'm sure such travel here in the west isn't as stressfull as east of the Mississippi. That is, of course we avoid the LA area. I know the SF Bay Area fairly well and know when to avoid those travel times. That all said my dream is to trailer travel to the DC area to visit our Navy son when he's relocated to Quantico with a trip to my home state, Michigan. Retracing my trip as a 14 year old along rte 66 from Michigan to LA is a wish also. Since we won't be in a 'hurry' to get anywhere I'd love to be able to map a 'blue highway' route where possible to realise this dream.

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Old 05-17-2012, 10:35 AM   #35
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Some good points have been made to avoid "burnout". We spent seven days coming north from Ajo, Arizona, and I WAS fried when we got here. Mainly, I think, because we never stayed anywhere more than an afternoon and overnight. On the return trip, I'll plan on a day or more at one place to rest and re-charge. Of course, having the semi cream-into us at the end of our trip did not improve my state of mind!
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Old 05-17-2012, 12:43 PM   #36
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Soapbox Rant Co-Tow!

I'm long divorced, quite contentedly, and have no expectations or plots of changing that status, but I do have moments of passing envy when I see couples who travel TOGETHER - not just in the same vehicles, but sharing the adventure and the chores.

One of my soapboxes is "Ladies, PLEASE Learn to Tow". Getting older isn't easy as our bodies find new ways to betray us, but my home campground is FULL of people who have been forced out of traveling because the husband can no longer drive. It shocks the spit out of me that some are in their mid 40's and most are in their mid 60's! They still camp, but the RV is now stored in the back lot, the campground tows it out to a site, "ma and paw" come to the campground in the family car and they spend two weeks camping 10 miles from their apartment. (Of course the wife can also have health problems that preclude driving, but normally hubby is the main driver.)

All too often when there's a pot luck dinner or even a casual conversation while folding laundry, I hear the lament, "Oh how we used to enjoy going to Lake Gaston or the Eastern Shore, or any number of destinations within a few hours drive." There's always the "I wish I'd learned to tow" story too. I have limited free time, but I do try to make time to teach these ladies, and there are a few others in the campground who also volunteer.

Ladies of 60, 70 or even older can learn to tow, but it makes so much sense to go ahead and start earlier (earlier = the next time it's hitched up and you're not in congested traffic).

Take it from me, as the husband ages it also becomes harder and harder to replace him with a younger model! So keeping the current one feeling young, healthy and semi-occasionally "frisky" could come down to something as simple as letting him take a nap for an hour or so while you drive.

DO IT NOW, your worst nightmare is that you're 100 miles from the nearest hospital and your husband bends over, makes snap-crackle-pop noises and can't straighten up! You now have NO choice but to tow the beast (and the Airstream) at least to the edge of a city where you can dial 911. Knowing you CAN tow even if you only do it occasionally is priceless.

Even if your husband is the one who most enjoys Airstreaming and you're just along to keep him away from predatory females like me, if you become a co-driver you'll probably gain interest in camping. And there is a certain confidence that comes from beating him at his own skill is there not?

Oh, BTW... believe it or not - if a husband thinks he's "available" ...I wouldn't touch him with a ten foot long awning pole!

Paula
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Old 05-17-2012, 12:50 PM   #37
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As we both grow older I am aware of the fact that you never know when something may occur that will make you incapacitated. I found that Good Sam has a medical evac service for about $100 a year that will airlift you home if you need medical treatment that is not available locally. Part of that service also means getting your tow vehicle and trailer home along with the pets and spouse. Hopefully I'll never need it but at least we have a fall back if something happens.

Patty towed once back in my pre Airstream days. I was in Branson with severe back issues....which is a whole story itself. Bottom line I drove the van and trailer to Springfield Mo, where the Interstate intersected US 65. Patty took over the rest of the way back to STL on the interstate, white knuckled but did well. At the time I had a full sized van and we pulled a 21' Hi-Lo. That Hi-Lo was a pretty friendly trailer when tucked down behind the van. When we got home the next door neighbor who had towing experience backed the trailer into the drive.

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Old 05-17-2012, 12:53 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshAir
I am 74, My wife of 43 years is 64. We haven't traveled too far from home since our retirement 6 years ago because we like to 'stay' at favorite places a week or so. However, we are thinking of taking long trips soon. We have ventured on more than 5 hours drive and THAT appears to be my hourly limit if we know where we are going to 'land'. Night driving is difficult and the stroke that my wife suffered 6 years ago prevents her from any driving. Other than that and arthritis issues we have no major health issues. We did travel ( road trips) much during the early years of our marriage and when the kids were growing up we did major 'tours' with/for them. The only turn off for us is major highway travel. I'm sure such travel here in the west isn't as stressfull as east of the Mississippi. That is, of course we avoid the LA area. I know the SF Bay Area fairly well and know when to avoid those travel times. That all said my dream is to trailer travel to the DC area to visit our Navy son when he's relocated to Quantico with a trip to my home state, Michigan. Retracing my trip as a 14 year old along rte 66 from Michigan to LA is a wish also. Since we won't be in a 'hurry' to get anywhere I'd love to be able to map a 'blue highway' route where possible to realise this dream.

Neil
My wife had a stroke 12 years ago, and that means we need to stop every 90 minutes for her to stretch or use the facilities. We spent two years living and traveling the country in our Limited, and we found that by leaving by nine am and stopping by four pm the mileage didn't matter.

Regards,

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Old 05-17-2012, 01:00 PM   #39
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Exactly, Paula. Barb was eager to learn to do this after I figured it out and could explain some things from experience. I, at least, had towed a car cross country and a U-Haul trailer 250 miles. We waited 'til we were in the middle of the Mojave Desert with straight roads and no traffic. I would say she drives about a 1/3 of the time, and might do more if she could peal my hands off the wheel. After 3 or 4 pm I go into my sleepy time, so that's one of the times she drives so I don't fall asleep driving. She still won't back up and I keep telling her the same story—what if I get sick or die on a trip? She says she'll figure it out then, and I'm sure she will.

I'm proud of her. She wasn't raised to do "men's work", but this is something she wanted to help with. I think a lot of women who won't drive were raised the same way. Maybe the younger ones are different.

Another thing I see women avoid at campgrounds is setting up and breaking down. Barb helps with the hitch, does the stabilizer jacks (they are hard on my back), and does some of the hook ups (yeh, she avoids the sewer hose). She even takes the garbage out. A campground owner once said he was amazed to see a women helping and then I noticed I rarely see any women doing this stuff.

Now, how do I get her to change oil?

Gene
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Old 05-17-2012, 01:19 PM   #40
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Another thing I see women avoid at campgrounds is setting up and breaking down. Barb helps with the hitch, does the stabilizer jacks (they are hard on my back), and does some of the hook ups (yeh, she avoids the sewer hose). She even takes the garbage out. A campground owner once said he was amazed to see a women helping and then I noticed I rarely see any women doing this stuff.
We see many couples who have the landing procedure split up, but most of the time it's "Dad" who takes care of it, with "the little woman" looking on. I deal with the hook-up, but with a mo/ho, it's no big deal. Yes, I take out the garbage.
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Old 05-17-2012, 01:29 PM   #41
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I tow and I can back up (actually pretty good!) Inevitably when we climb into the cab of the truck, he gets behind the wheel. I have to remind him to let me drive before we both get tired. I don't sleep when he drives. I feel like another set of eyes will keep problems at bay. We rarely travel more than 400 miles the first couple of days. The longer the trip, the lower the number of miles we travel/day. We have driven to Alaska three times and it takes no less than 3 weeks to cover the miles.

My arthritis makes doing the hitch and stabilizers difficult, but I know how to do them. I think it is good that the spouses (spice?) know how to do everything.

Pie
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Old 05-17-2012, 04:43 PM   #42
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...

She still won't back up and I keep telling her the same story—what if I get sick or die on a trip? She says she'll figure it out then, and I'm sure she will.

I'm proud of her. She wasn't raised to do "men's work", but this is something she wanted to help with. I think a lot of women who won't drive were raised the same way. Maybe the younger ones are different.

Another thing I see women avoid at campgrounds is setting up and breaking down. Barb helps with the hitch, does the stabilizer jacks (they are hard on my back), and does some of the hook ups (yeh, she avoids the sewer hose). She even takes the garbage out. A campground owner once said he was amazed to see a women helping and then I noticed I rarely see any women doing this stuff.

Now, how do I get her to change oil?

Gene
Backing up: Steal several orange cones - find a vacant parking lot and rent or borrow a landscaper's flatbed trailer. Back up one time, showing her what you're doing with the steering wheel, then pull back out. Repeat the instructions ONCE and repeat "less is more - a quarter of a turn will turn the trailer". Then get out of the truck, and go away, turn your back and read a book or drink a few beers. Let her practice without your help/nail biting/stuffing your whole hand in your mouth to stifle the laughter. Tell her to honk the horn when she feels comfortable with you watching.

Praise her. Repeat fulsomely and frequently - praise is like chocolate without the calories!

My favorite self taught trick is to fill an empty bottle of dish washing liquid with water - and "draw" a line from the back wheel of Airstream backwards into the parking spot where I want that wheel to end up. Then I drive the trailer over the wet line.

Oil Changes: Silly, give her a gift card from "Grease Monkey" or any other well known quick lube place. She'll drive the truck down there and do it for you!

Best wishes, Paula
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