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Old 12-30-2013, 08:18 AM   #1
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Brentwood , Tennessee
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Streamline 'Can you help with the year?'

OK, my father in law has given my wife and I a "gem". First off I am a new trailer owner, so from what I gather I have started at the TOP of trailer echelon. I know that this trailer is a Duke (obvious) but I cant determine the year. I have attached some pics to see if anyone can help? I plan on restoring once I pull out of the woods which should be in a few weeks. Once that happens, I will probably ask lots of questions, if I cant find them here. Also, I will post many pics because I know how helpful getting detailed information on these trailers can be. Thank you

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Old 12-30-2013, 09:14 AM   #2
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1964 26' Overlander
Richmond , Virginia
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Nice trailer. A friend of mine I met through these forums has a similar trailer.

You will find the construction similar to airstreams, but more substantial. The frame underneath is deeper, so you can get more insulation and bigger tanks under there. The riveting is pretty much the same. Lots of information here, and there are other Streamies on the forum that can chime in on tips.

Your best bet is just to ask questions and attach a picture of whatever you're asking about.

After you get it pulled out, you'll want to look at your tires and rims, and your axles to determine it's roadworthiness. I think in order of importance, it's rims and tires (you don't want split rims) and then axles and brakes. From there, probably electrical, then plumbing. I say that because you can camp in a trailer and use the plumbing at a campground or pull along some fresh water containers, but it's tough to work without lights, and you'll need electrical running to ensure that your brakes past inspection, plus your lights for towing.

Plumbing will take a while. Make sure you inspect your tanks, black and gray if you have them, fill up with water and look for leaks. Then you'll want to look at appliances - hot water heater, fridge, stove...

Have fun. Oh, and you may want to go ahead an open that line of credit with your bank....

Rob.
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Old 12-30-2013, 09:25 AM   #3
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Robwok
Thank you for the input. I have put in a plan to do just what you stated so your response is comforting. I have a handyman attitude and knowledge so I am hoping to do a lot of work my self. I just got done with a major renovation at my house and have a lot of material that was left over to replace electrical and plumbing lines. I wanted to restore but update if that is the correct line of thinking. I was going to take the wheels off and replace with new ones to put it out. Any recommendations of wheels and tires to replace?
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Old 12-30-2013, 10:14 AM   #4
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I've been curious about SSs construction for a while. I understand that, as Robwok states, they are more substantial than an AS, but since the biggest problem I've seen with AS is that they leak and the floors and frames rot, is the SS subject to the same issues, and are the repair methods for the floor issue the same (i.e. shell off full monte)?
Keep up posted. Looks like a nice project
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:22 PM   #5
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1964 26' Overlander
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There's no problem with starting with plumbing if that's what you have on hand. My issue is I hate redoing things. I have a stack of flooring I'm dying to put in my trailer (redo of the original tile) but since I'm putting in new tanks, I need to put in new elevator bolts. Those go right through the floor, so I need to do those first.

As far as tires, I will say that you also want to consider how original you want to keep the trailer. Many folks have upgraded the tires, or put on bigger tires for a better ride. Many have chosen radials for a smoother ride. My understanding is your trailer is a little heavier than an Airstream of the same age and length, but probably still lighter than a modern Airstream. Once you nail down your age, you can identify the appropriate weight, then get the tires to match. You'll find a lot of debate on the forums, so I'm not about to jump in on that one, but I have Maxxis on mine and have been happy with them.

As far as construction, on the streamlines are very similar. I don't remember the floor setup, but I think in the one I saw it was the same. They all do leak, and from my expierence, more leaks happen at seals than anywhere else (doors, windows, roof vents). Airsterams have leaks at the edges usually unless a skylight is left open.

Take a screwdriver and peck all the way around the edges you can find. If you go all the way through, you'll need to replace some floor. If you have surface rot in a space smaller than a dinner plate, and the wood in the bottom layer is solid, I would suggest epoxy rot cures instead of replacement. It will save you a lot of time and trouble if they're not in a critical spot. If somewhere there is a lot of weight (in front of toilet, in door way, under support leg of table, etc, you'll want to replace it.

If you really don't want to get into the floor issue, I could suggest this: open the belly pan, screw 1/2" - 3/4" ply under the rotted area, dig as much rot out as possible, vacuum and blow out as much rot as possible, then fill with epoxy like bondo.

I had very little rot in my trailer, and it wasn't worth a floor replacement. I was lucky. I don't know about this trailer you have as the roof is flat around your roof vents. That may be your first challenge after the running gear - the floor. If you have to replace that, you don't want to be redoing everything else. It's not expensive really, but labor intensive.
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:32 PM   #6
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Thank you. I have read and seen issues with subfloor. I assume the only way to access the sub floor is from the cabin? If so I had planned on taking everything out except the cabinet structure to inspect. I too am going to put wood flooring in that I have planed down to reduce weight bit give it a solid feel. Hopefully I can get the year of this and find a breakdown where most of the lines and supports are but I am sure with a little investigating I can find the layout.
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:43 PM   #7
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try tompatterson.com/streamline
1964 Streamline Duke
there may be info on the year.

As far as putting a floor on top of another floor, be careful. These trailers still have curved roofs. If you put another floor on that's thicker, it moves your base cabinets up, and any rivet holes will be off. Usually the only real problem is anything that goes floor to ceiling, like a closet. There you will have to trim the bottom, or the top. But, you'll have slight mismatches with the other cabinets if you trim the bottom. If you choose just to put wood flooring in areas that can be seen, then you'll want to make sure none of your cabinet or closet doors get locked in.

Rob
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Old 12-30-2013, 03:00 PM   #8
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Thank. I saw this one and it is very similar. My plan was to cut the floor around the cabinets rather than under but that will take a lot of time. Which I have fortunately.
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Old 01-02-2014, 12:39 AM   #9
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Given the square taillights that would make it 1968 or newer with an anodized exterior. Check Tom Pattrrsons site for more pictures once you get it and compare to the brochures.

There is also now a Yahoo group and we would love to have you register. If you compare the serial number to others listed that might help.

Have fun, we love ours!
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Old 01-03-2014, 05:04 AM   #10
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Jewel thank you. Tom's site is very helpful.
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Old 01-06-2014, 05:34 PM   #11
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Cobourg , Ontario
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Yes streamline is definitely top of the heap. A very expensive trailer when new. There should be a serial number stamped on the frame just behind the hitch. Are there any owners manuals etc. in the trailer? They are often found in a kitchen drawer. May have serial number, date of purchase and other interesting info.

To replace a rotten floor and do it right is a quite a job. No half measures or patch up jobs will do. Do it right or you will have to do it over. There are several good threads on floor replacement. I understand your trailer is easier to replace the floor in than an Airstream because the body shell fastens to the frame not to the floor.
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Old 01-10-2014, 07:52 AM   #12
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I have a 67 Empress and the tail lights are very similar. I'd say yours is within a year or two of mine. Any interior pics?
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Old 01-10-2014, 07:54 AM   #13
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ROBWOK, hubby wants to replace our original split wheels but I want it to look as original as possible. Suggestions?
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:27 AM   #14
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1964 26' Overlander
Richmond , Virginia
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you definitely need to replace the split rims. The option I went with was new wheels and tires from Vintage Trailer Supply's website. They matched my new axles, and VTS sells a chrome baby moon hubcap that makes it look new and original.

On my trailer, I actually had stamped steel Airstream hubcaps that cliped onto the wheels with metal tabs. They don't make those tabs now, but I could have had them welded on. SOme day in the future, I may have those hubcaps chromed and then tabs welded on to my rims so I can pop the hubcaps on. They're pretty rare though, so I may not actually drive with them on, just put them on at a rally, or just keep them in my attic and let them be a find for my executors.

Rob
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