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Old 06-10-2012, 05:36 PM   #1
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1965 22' Safari
Wasilla , Alaska
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Wall paper?

I own a 1965 Safari that was left in a terrible state when I discovered it for sale. The interior had to be gutted and we had to start from near-scratch rebuilding everything. The interior walls are in tough shape: there's dents in places, random cut wires sticking out in the sleep area, and so much that needs to be done to get it looking right. We had to completely remove the bathroom area at the end of the trailer and have built a bed platform there instead. I wanted it to feel as comfy as possible so I originally started covering the back curved walls in fabric. I'm not loving the way that looks anymore and I'm wondering if putting up wall paper would be a better idea. What would be the best way to smooth the walls down first? Is there a specific Airstream friendly wall paper I should use or would any interior paper work? Thanks for any & all advice!!
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Old 06-10-2012, 06:07 PM   #2
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Airstream uses something in the Safari/Flying Clouds that is "lovingly" referred to as "mouse fur". It's half carpet, half fabric. An Airstream dealer might be able to order it for you.

On the Classics they use a padded vinyl covering with reinforcing bands to keep it from sagging. Both are applied with glue.

I'd patch the inner skins before applying anything - making sure to get rid of bad electrical work such as flying splices, etc.

You might be able to use auto "headliner fabric" which is nylon knit with a foam backing. I notice you're in Alaska, so getting rid of air penetration is a good idea, and not going with the International "bare aluminum" look makes sense too.

Wallpaper? don't think it would stick to the curves very well.

Best wishes, Paula
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Old 06-10-2012, 09:13 PM   #3
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1965 22' Safari
Wasilla , Alaska
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Thanks so much for your suggestions! And yes, I'm in Alaska and I'd love to be able to spend time in my Airstream in the winter but so far that's not been possible. I only thought wallpaper because I thought it would hug the curves well but I've never actually installed it so I was only guessing. I will look into the material you mentioned though. Thanks again!
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Old 06-10-2012, 09:31 PM   #4
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1965 22' Safari
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And just curious because I'm new to all this, what is the best tool to use to grind down old electric wires and other rough surfaces on the interior walls?
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Old 06-13-2012, 06:17 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ak_chloe View Post
And just curious because I'm new to all this, what is the best tool to use to grind down old electric wires and other rough surfaces on the interior walls?
I think you'd better send some pictures. I cannot quite get my mind around the idea of needing to "grind down" wires.

Airstreams are built with two layers of skin, one on the outside of the ribs, the other on the interior. Wires should run between the two layers except where there are outlets, switches or light fixtures. If wires have been cut to remove a fixture or outlet, they'll be needed to install a new one in the old one's place. If you are planning to remove a light or outlet, you have to remove the wire from the converter or fuse panel as well as from the place in the wall where the outlet once was. Before you do that, you should make sure you know how the circuit runs because there are usually more than one light/outlet on a circuit. If you're eliminating a single outlet for instance, you should never use an open or "flying splice" (twisting the wires together and using tape or wire nuts to over them and bury this behind a wall. Instead, you leave the wires in the box, and put a blank face on the box (no holes for plugs or a switch). That way, if you or anyone else wants to put the outlet/fixture back in they just reopen the box and rewire it.

Leaving a live wire between the walls is horribly dangerous - electrifying the shell or starting a fire would be the big hazards. If a wire is disconnected at both ends it might be possible to actually pull it out of the wall, however it might be anchored at some point to a rib. If you're absolutely sure you've got a dead wire, you could simply roll it back into the space between the walls and patch over the hole in the interior skin.

If there are holes in the interior shell there are several ways to patch them. Again please send pictures.

Paula
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