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Old 02-28-2007, 06:12 PM   #1
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Arrow Repairing cracks in plastic interior parts.

Hi to all forum members; I would like to share some information pertaining repairs on damaged plastic interior components. My rear plastic inner end cap was severely cracked in a couple of places. For a long time I have wrestled with a question of what would do a best job repairing it. I have asked many professionals to no avail. A salesman from one of my distributors recommended DEVCON Seal-n-place #90216. Comes in White or Almond/Bisque and the stuff is aw some. It cannot be separated after half hour. Two 30 gram kits repaired about 28" of linear crack. Comes with 5" strip of fiberglass tape which is not quite enough. In addition to glass tape, I have backed it up with 1/8" plastic strip over the fiberglass. Great repair. It is a two part polymer base and it takes only 20 minutes to set up. If anyone has plastic to repair you have to try it. Thanks, "Boatdoc"
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Old 02-28-2007, 06:24 PM   #2
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Cracks in Plastic

Thanks for the information. I've been fighting cracks for a long time. I posted a request a couple of years ago for information with limited success. I've used fiberglass repair kits with good results.

There is another product that drys black. I'm checking it out now. Some of the commercial repair shops use it.

Where do you buy the material you are using?

thanks and happy trails

dale
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Old 02-28-2007, 06:24 PM   #3
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Think it would work on a sink?

boatdoc: thanks for posting that information. The sink in my trailer broke on our maiden voyage. The plastic was very brittle and I think a cup fell in it during travel. Not only did it crack, it actually broke out several irregular shaped pieces about the size of a quarter. It's "repaired" (in computer lingo, we'd call it a kludge) with gaffer's tape. I'd rather find something more permanent. Do you think this product would be suitable for that type of repair? If so, where do I find it and how much does it cost?
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Old 02-28-2007, 06:45 PM   #4
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I would also like to know where to find this product. Our bathroom has several cracks that the PO apparently thought looked better with white caulking "shmeared" in and around them.
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Old 02-28-2007, 08:23 PM   #5
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Many of us have been searching for a solution to our ABS woes. Thanks for this post. Could you please put up some photos of your repair?
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Old 03-01-2007, 05:13 AM   #6
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Arrow Devcon Seal-N-Place

Quote:
Originally Posted by SWAMPBILLIES
I would also like to know where to find this product. Our bathroom has several cracks that the PO apparently thought looked better with white caulking "shmeared" in and around them.
Hi all; Many of you have expressed interest in my findings with Devcon product. Here is more info on this stuff.
Devcon Seal-N-Place is a product of ITW Performance Polymers of Riviera Beach FL, 33404. ITW Performance Polymers It is a two part polymer of 1500lbs/sq.inch tensile strength, resists water and is non flammable. Working temp range -40F to +200 F. It is for use on plastics, Fiberglass and ceramics.
Sets up within 15 minutes. It is recommended for repairs on bathtubs, shower stalls, surrounds and sinks. Comes only in white and almond/bisque.
I have repaired two 18" cracks in my inner rear end cap, half hour later I attempted to to beat it apart with no luck. Stuff is absolutely great. I got it from my supplier who does not sell to public. If you cannot find it in your area I can supply you with it. It can be shipped without Hazmat Label. 30 gram kit sells for $14.10. In my case, two kits repaired about 32" long crack in the inner cap. Kit comes with Dye Pouch. I, as many of you looked a long time for the solution to plastic repair because replacement plastic parts are very expensive. Thanks and good luck with your repairs. "Boatdoc"
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Old 03-01-2007, 06:50 AM   #7
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Sounds Great.......

.............but there is another method to repair broken plastic. It's called plastic welding. There are 2 techniques to accomplish this. The first is to use a specific type of hot air 'plastic welder' and formulated welding rods. You are essentially melting the surface of the plastic in a controlled manner and adding new, compatible material, just like welding metal. The hardware can be bought from Harbor Freight for under $30 and the unit is virtually identicle to the $300+ ones sold elsewhere. Many water tanks and other large plastic parts are assembled using this method. Works on ABS, polyethylene, polypropylene and a few others.

The other method is similar, but uses an airless heat appliance similar to a soldering iron. The application technique is similar as well.

I have used the hot air method many times to repair ABS holding tanks and some small plastic parts. It takes a little practice to get good at it, but the results are very satisfactory.

If you Google 'plastic welding', a wealth of information will be at your disposal....................
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Old 03-01-2007, 10:08 AM   #8
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We have cracks in our overhead tambour bins in our motorhome. Do you know if your "plastic" is the same material?
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Old 03-01-2007, 11:41 AM   #9
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Great Idea. Here's one I used when I couldn't get info on repairing cracks. First, drill a round hole at each end to keep it from running anymore. Then I went to my local newspaper and got a sheet of their used printing aluminum (print shop would have smaller versions of aluminum sheets) Then I cut a strip long enough and wide enough to cover the run. Got trusty 1/8 drill bit and riveter and riveted the sucker over the run. Then used body filler (green stuff) over it like a builder covers seams in sheetrock. I sanded it and then painted the ceiling an off white and came back with sponge and darker paint and faux finished it. Crack invisible, ceiling looks new. Hope this helps someone.
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Old 03-01-2007, 11:51 AM   #10
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I wonder how this stuff would do for filling in un-used holes in an aluminum inner skin? I have wondered what sort of filler could do the job and could somehow be textured to look like the vinyl skin on the aluminum. I would appreciate any thoughts...

Malcolm
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Old 03-01-2007, 03:59 PM   #11
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Thanks for putting such valuable information on this forum - I, like many, have looked unsucessfully for such a product.
I have an 8" crack in the inner plastic ceiling at the front end of my Argosy, above the upper cabinet. I can't get behind the crack unless I took the ceiling down (not prepared to do so at this time). Do you think this product would work to fill in the small space in the crack without being able to put a backing tape or plate on it? Any suggestions on using your product for this application would be greatly appreciated. Thanks - Carol
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Old 03-02-2007, 04:42 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by str8strm
We have cracks in our overhead tambour bins in our motorhome. Do you know if your "plastic" is the same material?
Hi str8strm; Yes it is. Devcon will repair them. Thanks "Boatdoc"
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Old 03-02-2007, 04:46 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krwrite
Great Idea. Here's one I used when I couldn't get info on repairing cracks. First, drill a round hole at each end to keep it from running anymore. Then I went to my local newspaper and got a sheet of their used printing aluminum (print shop would have smaller versions of aluminum sheets) Then I cut a strip long enough and wide enough to cover the run. Got trusty 1/8 drill bit and riveter and riveted the sucker over the run. Then used body filler (green stuff) over it like a builder covers seams in sheetrock. I sanded it and then painted the ceiling an off white and came back with sponge and darker paint and faux finished it. Crack invisible, ceiling looks new. Hope this helps someone.
ken
76 31' sovereign. Birmingham, Al
Hi Ken; I am sure you did a graeat job, but that is a lot of unnecessary work. Thanks, "boatdoc"
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Old 03-02-2007, 05:17 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malconium
I wonder how this stuff would do for filling in un-used holes in an aluminum inner skin? I have wondered what sort of filler could do the job and could somehow be textured to look like the vinyl skin on the aluminum. I would appreciate any thoughts...

Malcolm
Hi Malcom; I can tell you are very particular about quality like me, but that can be good and bad at the same time. However, you have picked a very difficult subject. The problem is, that unless you can access the back of aluminum skin and place a piece of duct tape over the hole to stop it from dripping out from the hole it will not work. If you can remove the inner skin, place a piece of duct tape over the hole. Push a short rivet into the hole to detent the duct tape, then you can drip the Devcon in until it is level with the surface. As the stuff begins to set up using small wire brush hit the top of repaired hole. Another way to duplicate the finish is to get a fiberglass mold release wax. Put a few coats of that wax on piece of same pattern skin finish. As the Devcon starts to set up, lay the waxed piece of inner skin over the repaired area and press down on it. This will force the Devcon to level leaving same imprint. Be sure that Devcon is just ever so slightly above repaired area, and wait with imprinting it until Devcon it still soft but tack free. Be sure not to lift the waxed aluminum until Devcon has set up. Be sure to re- wax your imprint plate each time you use it. You can be sure that would make perfect repair if you are willing to go into that much work. If you decide to use the Devcon I would recommend that you open up the pouches and mix only needed amount just for one hole at the time. Devcon sets up in about six minutes. Good luck if you willing to give it a go. Thanks "Boatdoc"
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